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uk.tech.tv.video.pvr Personal Video Recorder (PVR) (uk.tech.tv.video.pvr) Hard disk-based Personal Video Recorder(PVR) systems.

Uninformed question



 
 
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  #1  
Old February 13th 04, 07:01 AM posted to uk.tech.tv.video.pvr
Andy Pandy
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Posts: 3
Default Uninformed question

After several flashes and spitting noises, it appears I need to buy a
new TV.

With the annoyance of increasing ' letter-boxing ' I believe it's
called, I clearly require a widescreen but that's the only detail I
have settled on, oh and I prefer it to be black which would appear to
severely limit my choice !!!

Could someone please briefly clarify the current technical situation
as regards analogue and digital along with it's main benefits, and if
I did decide to buy a cheap analogue model, what it's expected life
might be !!

I have no requirement for home cinema for example, nicam will be
perfectly adequate, though it would be good to be able to plug in a
digital camera. Thanks for any forth-coming advice.


Andy Pandy
To e-mail, address hopefully, self-explanatory !
Ads
  #2  
Old February 14th 04, 03:06 PM posted to uk.tech.tv.video.pvr
KENNETH WALSH
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Posts: 1
Default Uninformed question


"Andy Pandy" wrote in message
...
After several flashes and spitting noises, it appears I need to buy a
new TV.

With the annoyance of increasing ' letter-boxing ' I believe it's
called, I clearly require a widescreen but that's the only detail I
have settled on, oh and I prefer it to be black which would appear to
severely limit my choice !!!


well with fashion as it is next year it might be the flavour in vouge again

Could someone please briefly clarify the current technical situation
as regards analogue and digital along with it's main benefits, and if
I did decide to buy a cheap analogue model, what it's expected life
might be !!


well if you use a digital box either Sky or Terr` digital or even cable TV
then it will not matter. I have not heard a 100% date when the analogue
TV will be turned off so to be honest by the time that date does
come round you might need a new tv anyhow

I have no requirement for home cinema for example, nicam will be
perfectly adequate, though it would be good to be able to plug in a
digital camera. Thanks for any forth-coming advice.


I would say a bog standard TV would still fit your bill if you don`t have
a DVD player even a 4x3 TV size rather than a widescreen would be ok
for you.

Don`t let the shop seller push you into getting a TV (with all bells and whistles
that you will not need) just make sure it has a connection that can fit your
camera.

Widscreen TV can be a pain when you just watch domestic telly but they
are putting more and more stuff in widescreen even then you might get black bars
on your screen as there are different variations of widescreen/letterbox size.

Or you could just say sod it I`ll have that five grand plasma TV in the window ;-)

Ken


  #3  
Old February 14th 04, 03:15 PM posted to uk.tech.tv.video.pvr
QrizB
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Posts: 93
Default Uninformed question

On Fri, 13 Feb 2004 07:01:43 +0000, Andy Pandy
wrote:

Could someone please briefly clarify the current technical situation
as regards analogue and digital along with it's main benefits


I'm afraid you haven't chosen a very good newsgroup for this question.
You might like to ask in the home cinema or digital TV groups.

--
QrizB

"On second thought, let's not go to Z'Ha'Dum. It is a silly place."
  #5  
Old February 14th 04, 05:03 PM posted to uk.tech.tv.video.pvr
Andy Pandy
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Posts: 3
Default Uninformed question

On Sat, 14 Feb 2004 15:06:34 +0000 (UTC), "KENNETH WALSH"
wrote:


Widscreen TV can be a pain when you just watch domestic telly but they
are putting more and more stuff in widescreen even then you might get black bars
on your screen as there are different variations of widescreen/letterbox size.

Or you could just say sod it I`ll have that five grand plasma TV in the window ;-)

Ken


Thank for the info. I must say the flat screens look the business but
just a little to much for my budget ! :-)


Andy Pandy
To e-mail, address hopefully, self-explanatory !
  #6  
Old February 15th 04, 07:24 AM posted to uk.tech.tv.video.pvr
Jomtien
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Posts: 6,814
Default Uninformed question

Andy Pandy wrote:

Could someone please briefly clarify the current technical situation
as regards analogue and digital along with it's main benefits, and if
I did decide to buy a cheap analogue model, what it's expected life
might be !!


This is a non-issue. All normal TVs are analogue. They may include a
digital tuner (very few do) but they are still analogue TVs. They will
be viable for decades and the move to digital broadcasting will not
affect them as you can always buy a 50 Freeview adaptor or a sat box
to provide a signal if terrestrial analogue broadcasting ever ceases.
The same applies to your VCR or DVD burner.

If you have Freeview or a Sky box then you should buy a widescreen TV
as most new output is in widescreen. Given that Freeview may at some
point replace regular analogue transmissions you should buy widescreen
for this reason also.

One question you should ask yourself is whether to get a 50hz or a
100hz TV. To decide this, go to a shop and view analogue RF channels
and digital channels (Freeview or Sky) on both a 50hz and a 100hz TV.
Be sure to view both types of source. You will soon spot the
differences and can act accordingly. Some like 50hz and some like
100hz. There is no right or wrong and both types have advantages and
disadvantages.

Your budget will also have much effect on what you should buy.

--
Digibox problem? : A reboot solves 90% of these.
The Sky Digital FAQ: http://tinyurl.com/yvnsy
How to get UK TV overseas: http://tinyurl.com/6p73
Fed up with logos / red buttons? : http://logofreetv.org/
BBC gone? : http://www.astra2d.co.uk/
----
Only the truth as I see it.
No monies return'd. ;-)
  #7  
Old February 15th 04, 02:57 PM posted to uk.tech.tv.video.pvr
Steve
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Posts: 444
Default Uninformed question

Jomtien wrote in
:

Andy Pandy wrote:

Could someone please briefly clarify the current technical situation
as regards analogue and digital along with it's main benefits, and if
I did decide to buy a cheap analogue model, what it's expected life
might be !!


This is a non-issue. All normal TVs are analogue. They may include a
digital tuner (very few do) but they are still analogue TVs. They will
be viable for decades and the move to digital broadcasting will not
affect them as you can always buy a 50 Freeview adaptor or a sat box
to provide a signal if terrestrial analogue broadcasting ever ceases.
The same applies to your VCR or DVD burner


However, not all TVs have enough RGB inputs, you would probably want to see
the difference before shelling out extra though.


If you have Freeview or a Sky box then you should buy a widescreen TV
as most new output is in widescreen. Given that Freeview may at some
point replace regular analogue transmissions you should buy widescreen
for this reason also.

One question you should ask yourself is whether to get a 50hz or a
100hz TV. To decide this, go to a shop and view analogue RF channels
and digital channels (Freeview or Sky) on both a 50hz and a 100hz TV.
Be sure to view both types of source. You will soon spot the
differences and can act accordingly. Some like 50hz and some like
100hz. There is no right or wrong and both types have advantages and
disadvantages.


Make sure the source involves fast moving action rather than some nice
stills. I have seen some horrible effects with this - over and above the
usual MPEG artifacts. But I agree, no ones opinion or theory is better than
your own preferences.
  #8  
Old February 16th 04, 06:37 AM posted to uk.tech.tv.video.pvr
Jomtien
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 6,814
Default Uninformed question

Steve wrote:

However, not all TVs have enough RGB inputs, you would probably want to see
the difference before shelling out extra though.


That's true, though a simple 35 auto scart switcher will cure this.
My Sony has 4 scarts, two being RGB. I still need to use my scart
switcher.


Make sure the source involves fast moving action rather than some nice
stills.


Indeed.

--
Digibox problem? : A reboot solves 90% of these.
The Sky Digital FAQ: http://tinyurl.com/yvnsy
How to get UK TV overseas: http://tinyurl.com/6p73
Fed up with logos / red buttons? : http://logofreetv.org/
BBC gone? : http://www.astra2d.co.uk/
----
Only the truth as I see it.
No monies return'd. ;-)
  #9  
Old February 16th 04, 02:40 PM posted to uk.tech.tv.video.pvr
Duncan Booth
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 1
Default Uninformed question

Andy Pandy wrote in
:

With the annoyance of increasing ' letter-boxing ' I believe it's
called, I clearly require a widescreen but that's the only detail I
have settled on, oh and I prefer it to be black which would appear to
severely limit my choice !!!


Don't be pushed into a widescreen TV unless you want one. Most (all?)
modern 4:3 TVs will happily display a 16:9 picture just as well as a
widescreen TV, but with black bars top and bottom. We have a 29" 4:3 TV,
which by my calculation should display a widescreen picture at about the
same size as a 27" widescreen TV. A 32" 4:3 should be about the same
picture width as a 29" widescreen.

When we last bought a TV we worked out that it was cheaper to get a 4:3
model than a similar widescreen model with the same screen width, and we
have the added benefit of much bigger pictures for those programs which are
still broadcast 4:3.

Of course, prices may vary and my calculations could be wildly wrong: I'm
working on the assumption that the quoted picture diagonal for a 4:3 screen
will be 5/4's the picture width, and for a 16:9 screen it will be
18.36/16's the picture width, but of course the visible area will be
something else again.
 




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