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Indoor wideband freeview aerial?



 
 
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  #1  
Old January 16th 06, 05:17 PM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
[email protected]
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Posts: 1
Default Indoor wideband freeview aerial?

I have a friend in Bournemouth who has rushed out and bought a Freeview
box without checking the coverage first. Having plugged it in there's
no joy, so a quick check on freeview.co.uk reveals that a wideband
aerial is required.

Thing is, she's renting in a flat with a shared aerial so an upgrade to
the roof aerial isn't an easy matter. Is there an amplified indoor
aerial that might work, or do indoor aerials tend not to be
sufficiently "wideband"? I'm not really sure what counts as wideband
in this context.

If so, anyone know of a friendly stockist in the Bournemouth area who
would let one go on sale or return, in case it doesn't fix the problem?
Many thanks.

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  #2  
Old January 16th 06, 05:44 PM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
Mark Carver
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Posts: 7,633
Default Indoor wideband freeview aerial?

wrote:
I have a friend in Bournemouth who has rushed out and bought a Freeview
box without checking the coverage first. Having plugged it in there's
no joy, so a quick check on freeview.co.uk reveals that a wideband
aerial is required.


That's out of date, only a Group A (what any existing aerial from the analogue
only days) is needed now. (Mux 2 moved from UHF 52 to 28 a couple of years ago),

Thing is, she's renting in a flat with a shared aerial so an upgrade to
the roof aerial isn't an easy matter. Is there an amplified indoor
aerial that might work, or do indoor aerials tend not to be
sufficiently "wideband"? I'm not really sure what counts as wideband
in this context.


Most likely the distribution system in her block has not been upgraded, the
filtering will need to be changed to pass the DTT channels. She needs to get
on to her landlord to get that work done.

If she has a clear view towards the IOW she stands a good chance with an
indoor aerial, the transmitter is at Rowridge on the island, signals if it's
in view should be reasonably strong.

If so, anyone know of a friendly stockist in the Bournemouth area who
would let one go on sale or return, in case it doesn't fix the problem?


Argos

--
Mark
Please replace invalid and invalid with gmx and net to reply.
  #3  
Old January 16th 06, 06:22 PM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
Chris
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Posts: 13
Default Indoor wideband freeview aerial?


Mark Carver wrote:

wrote:
I have a friend in Bournemouth who has rushed out and bought a Freeview
box without checking the coverage first. Having plugged it in there's
no joy, so a quick check on freeview.co.uk reveals that a wideband
aerial is required.

snip
If so, anyone know of a friendly stockist in the Bournemouth area who
would let one go on sale or return, in case it doesn't fix the problem?

snip

Thanks for the very specific response and sorry I can't seem to get
google groups to format a post sensibly so I've had to do some major
snipping.

Any tips on persuading a clueless / belligerant landlord that they
should be spending their money tinkering with what they might regard as
a working TV distribution system? It's not as if the residents have a
right to freeview reception after all.

Also, any views on the merits of this unit from Argos:
http://www.argos.co.uk/static/Produc...er/5343243.htm

Thanks.

  #4  
Old January 16th 06, 06:44 PM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
Mark Carver
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Posts: 7,633
Default Indoor wideband freeview aerial?

Chris wrote:
Mark Carver wrote:

wrote:

I have a friend in Bournemouth who has rushed out and bought a Freeview
box without checking the coverage first. Having plugged it in there's
no joy, so a quick check on freeview.co.uk reveals that a wideband
aerial is required.


snip

If so, anyone know of a friendly stockist in the Bournemouth area who
would let one go on sale or return, in case it doesn't fix the problem?


snip

Thanks for the very specific response and sorry I can't seem to get
google groups to format a post sensibly so I've had to do some major
snipping.


Don't use the Reply tab, use the Options tab, *then* the reply tab above (not
below) the text box


Any tips on persuading a clueless / belligerant landlord that they
should be spending their money tinkering with what they might regard as
a working TV distribution system? It's not as if the residents have a
right to freeview reception after all.


Well, they're going to have to do it before analogue switch off, so now's a
good a time as any.

Also, any views on the merits of this unit from Argos:
http://www.argos.co.uk/static/Produc...er/5343243.htm


Ummmm.. I'd go for a better aerial that has some elements, rather than what in
effect is a bit coat hanger with an amp.

I'd go for this first:-
http://www.argos.co.uk/static/Produc...er/5342000.htm

--
Mark
Please replace invalid and invalid with gmx and net to reply.
  #5  
Old January 16th 06, 08:01 PM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
Chris
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Posts: 13
Default Indoor wideband freeview aerial?

Mark Carver wrote:
Chris wrote:
Mark Carver wrote:

wrote:

snip

Thanks for the very specific response and sorry I can't seem to get
google groups to format a post sensibly so I've had to do some major
snipping.


Don't use the Reply tab, use the Options tab, *then* the reply tab above (not
below) the text box


Great, thanks.

Any tips on persuading a clueless / belligerant landlord that they
should be spending their money tinkering with what they might regard as
a working TV distribution system? It's not as if the residents have a
right to freeview reception after all.


Well, they're going to have to do it before analogue switch off, so now's a
good a time as any.


I guess my point was that they may not feel obliged to do it either now
or at switch off. There are other distribution mechanisms for digi TV
and I'm not sure what "right" if any there is to freeview compatible
aerial signals in flats. It's a bit hypothetical as I'm not at all
sure they will be unreasonable about it - was just interested to know
if the group has any well practiced persuasive techniques which might
be employed by a resident.

Also, any views on the merits of this unit from Argos:
http://www.argos.co.uk/static/Produc...er/5343243.htm


Ummmm.. I'd go for a better aerial that has some elements, rather than what in
effect is a bit coat hanger with an amp.

I'd go for this first:-
http://www.argos.co.uk/static/Produc...er/5342000.htm


Interesting, that one seems to have no amplification. Wouldn't an
amplified unit with elements be a safer bet? This one perhaps:

http://www.argos.co.uk/static/Produc...er/5344008.htm

--
Chris

  #6  
Old January 16th 06, 08:55 PM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
Slitheen
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Posts: 125
Default Indoor wideband freeview aerial?


wrote in message
ups.com...
I have a friend in Bournemouth who has rushed out and bought a Freeview
box without checking the coverage first. Having plugged it in there's
no joy, so a quick check on freeview.co.uk reveals that a wideband
aerial is required.

Thing is, she's renting in a flat with a shared aerial so an upgrade to
the roof aerial isn't an easy matter. Is there an amplified indoor
aerial that might work, or do indoor aerials tend not to be
sufficiently "wideband"? I'm not really sure what counts as wideband
in this context.

If so, anyone know of a friendly stockist in the Bournemouth area who
would let one go on sale or return, in case it doesn't fix the problem?
Many thanks.


Listen, despite what you hear - these are the facts as I *personally* came
across them. I too presently need to use an indoor aerial for Freeview - I
had a 15 year old, non wideband, cheapest possible Argos 4.99 jobbie
knocking around that I had used in conjunction with a cheap old signal
booster for normal analogue TV - and it worked flawlessly for Freeview. The
only thing was, every time someone flicked a switch on in the house (light,
kettle..etc), I got a quick, ever so slight bit of interference. So I looked
on Digital Spy Forum to see what was recommended. Nearly everyone suggested
this particular 'Telecam' indoor wideband aerial that Argos sell - so I went
and got it. The quality was much worse - I couldn't even get some channels I
previously got (previously got them all). I have no idea why, and I even
exchanged it to see if it was faulty, same thing happened. Went back to the
old one, bingo - it was perfect. I since learned I would have got the
domestic electrical appliance interference even with a wideband indoor
aerial - as this is to do with the poorly screened cables that tend to come
with most or all indoor aerials, and the fact they're actually *indoor*
aerials makes them prone to domestic interference. I'm not presenting this
as an argument against whatever else you are advised here, but this *is* how
it happened for me. So I would at least recommend that if you *do* have any
old indoor aerial knocking around, at least try it first - in conjunction
with a standard single set booster. Also, many people argue that you
shouldn't use a signal booster, as they will boost any interference along
with the signal itself. I found this to be utterly untrue (in *my* case).
Without a signal booster, I have poor, incomplete Freeview reception, with
one - I have lovely, crisp reception on all channels - the only interference
I get, as I have said, is the odd, slight crackle when someone flicks a
light on. That I can easily live with. If you can't, you'll need a roof
aerial upgrade after all.

Regards,

Slitheen.


  #7  
Old January 17th 06, 07:38 AM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
Mark Carver
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Posts: 7,633
Default Indoor wideband freeview aerial?

Chris wrote:
Mark Carver wrote:



Also, any views on the merits of this unit from Argos:
http://www.argos.co.uk/static/Produc...er/5343243.htm


Ummmm.. I'd go for a better aerial that has some elements, rather than what in
effect is a bit coat hanger with an amp.

I'd go for this first:-
http://www.argos.co.uk/static/Produc...er/5342000.htm



Interesting, that one seems to have no amplification. Wouldn't an
amplified unit with elements be a safer bet? This one perhaps:

http://www.argos.co.uk/static/Produc...er/5344008.htm


I'd be cautious about using any gain initially. It depends entirely upon how
strong the signals are within the flat. If it's in a elevated position, and
the transmitter is visible (as Rowridge is in many areas of Bournemouth), then
you run the risk of overloading the box, not so much with the DTT signals, but
with the analogue transmissions (which in Rowridge's case are adjacent to them).

How high and, what direction does your friend's flat face, where is it exactly
? I know the town quite well.

--
Mark
Please replace invalid and invalid with gmx and net to reply.
  #8  
Old January 17th 06, 10:12 AM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
Mark Carver
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Posts: 1,220
Default Indoor wideband freeview aerial?


Slitheen wrote:

had a 15 year old, non wideband, cheapest possible Argos 4.99 jobbie
knocking around


I've never come across a grouped indoor (aka set top) aerial, what
aerial grouping did it cover ?

  #9  
Old January 17th 06, 01:42 PM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
Bill Wright
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Posts: 8,408
Default Indoor wideband freeview aerial?


"Mark Carver" wrote in message
oups.com...

Slitheen wrote:

had a 15 year old, non wideband, cheapest possible Argos 4.99 jobbie
knocking around


I've never come across a grouped indoor (aka set top) aerial, what
aerial grouping did it cover ?


Antiference made a five element grouped indoor aerial in the 1970s.

Bill


  #10  
Old January 17th 06, 05:58 PM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
Doctor D
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Posts: 1,022
Default Indoor wideband freeview aerial?


"Bill Wright" wrote in message
...

"Mark Carver" wrote in message
oups.com...

Slitheen wrote:

had a 15 year old, non wideband, cheapest possible Argos 4.99 jobbie
knocking around


I've never come across a grouped indoor (aka set top) aerial, what
aerial grouping did it cover ?


Antiference made a five element grouped indoor aerial in the 1970s.

Bill



I remember those. They were white plastic with gold coloured elements. I
never saw any version other than group A on sale anywhere.

They were V polarized from the box, and to convert them to H involved
sweeping the element train around in a 45 degree arc on a pivot. The
instructions didn't mention this and I saw a few where ham fisted users
snapped the pivot whilst trying to change the polarization.

They were rare compared with the Labgear wire log which was around at the
time, and indeed Antiference eventually ditched it and started with the
Silver Sensor log which was all black and chrome and much better looking!
(It was also much better at rejecting ghosting.)


 




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