A Sky, cable and digital tv forum. Digital TV Banter

If this is your first visit, be sure to check out the FAQ by clicking the link above. You may have to register before you can post: click the register link above to proceed. To start viewing messages, select the forum that you want to visit from the selection below.

Go Back   Home » Digital TV Banter forum » Digital TV Newsgroups » uk.tech.digital-tv (Digital TV - General)
Site Map Home Register Authors List Search Today's Posts Mark Forums Read Web Partners

uk.tech.digital-tv (Digital TV - General) (uk.tech.digital-tv) Discussion of all matters technical in origin related to the reception of digital television transmissions, be they via satellite, terrestrial or cable. Advertising is forbidden, with no exceptions.

End of unjustifed geoblocking within EU



 
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
  #1  
Old April 3rd 18, 04:19 PM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
John[_21_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 74
Default End of unjustifed geoblocking within EU

On Saturday, 17 March 2018 12:52:09 UTC, Peter Duncanson wrote:
On Sat, 17 Mar 2018 07:15:09 +0000, Robin wrote:

On 16/03/2018 16:43, Martin wrote:
On Fri, 16 Mar 2018 14:21:13 +0000, Clive Page wrote:

On 16/03/2018 12:06, Indy Jess John wrote:
Don't get your hopes up too high. I bet the BBC will find some loophole so that they don't have to make iplayer available across Europe.

I don't think the BBC will have to take the trouble. The new rules don't take effect until 9 months after they are published, by which time we shall, if our present populist government have their way, have left the EU.

They take effect on 1-4-18.

The Regulation was not published until 28 February this year. Hence

"The new rules will start applying on 3rd December 2018, nine months
after the publication of the Regulation in the EU Official Journal, to
allow in particular small traders to adapt."

https://ec.europa.eu/digital-single-...-single-market


I'm also unclear about the application of the Regulation to BBC services
given they are not subscription based. But I freely admit I've no idea
if their status as a "trader" for this has already been established.


I think broadcasters are affected by another matter: copyright.
My, very limited, understanding of copyright and other intellectual
property rights is that they are typically operated on a territorial
basis. So when a broadcaster pays to show a film or TV show it pays for
the right to show it in its own territory.


--
Peter Duncanson
(in uk.tech.digital-tv)


Sure, but the EU could class such restrictive contracts illegal, and demand that they are for the whole of the European Single Market or not at all.

John
Ads
  #2  
Old April 3rd 18, 06:17 PM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
Terry Casey[_2_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 768
Default End of unjustifed geoblocking within EU

In article bb1e894d-c15c-47c0-9e38-
, says...

On Saturday, 17 March 2018 12:52:09 UTC, Peter Duncanson wrote:
On Sat, 17 Mar 2018 07:15:09 +0000, Robin wrote:

On 16/03/2018 16:43, Martin wrote:
On Fri, 16 Mar 2018 14:21:13 +0000, Clive Page wrote:

I'm also unclear about the application of the Regulation
to BBC services given they are not subscription based.
But I freely admit I've no idea if their status as
a "trader" for this has already been established.


I think broadcasters are affected by another matter: copyright.
My, very limited, understanding of copyright and other intellectual
property rights is that they are typically operated on a territorial
basis. So when a broadcaster pays to show a film or TV show it pays for
the right to show it in its own territory.


Sure, but the EU could class such restrictive contracts illegal, and demand that they are for the whole of the European Single Market or not at all.


But will the EU stump up the multi-million Euro cost of
building and launching a new satellite to increae the
coverage?

It's not like getting someone in to go up and swap the aerial
for a new one - unless you know someone with a very long
ladder - around 30,000 miles to get up to an object 22,236
miles above the equator!



--

Terry

---
This email has been checked for viruses by AVG.
http://www.avg.com

  #3  
Old April 3rd 18, 06:23 PM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
Max Demian
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 3,970
Default End of unjustifed geoblocking within EU

On 03/04/2018 19:17, Terry Casey wrote:
In article bb1e894d-c15c-47c0-9e38-
, says...

On Saturday, 17 March 2018 12:52:09 UTC, Peter Duncanson wrote:
On Sat, 17 Mar 2018 07:15:09 +0000, Robin wrote:

On 16/03/2018 16:43, Martin wrote:
On Fri, 16 Mar 2018 14:21:13 +0000, Clive Page wrote:

I'm also unclear about the application of the Regulation
to BBC services given they are not subscription based.
But I freely admit I've no idea if their status as
a "trader" for this has already been established.

I think broadcasters are affected by another matter: copyright.
My, very limited, understanding of copyright and other intellectual
property rights is that they are typically operated on a territorial
basis. So when a broadcaster pays to show a film or TV show it pays for
the right to show it in its own territory.


Sure, but the EU could class such restrictive contracts illegal, and demand that they are for the whole of the European Single Market or not at all.


But will the EU stump up the multi-million Euro cost of
building and launching a new satellite to increae the
coverage?

It's not like getting someone in to go up and swap the aerial
for a new one - unless you know someone with a very long
ladder - around 30,000 miles to get up to an object 22,236
miles above the equator!


Just pop up the space elevator.

--
Max Demian
  #4  
Old April 3rd 18, 06:35 PM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
R. Mark Clayton[_2_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 649
Default End of unjustifed geoblocking within EU

On Tuesday, 3 April 2018 19:17:41 UTC+1, Terry Casey wrote:
In article bb1e894d-c15c-47c0-9e38-
, says...

On Saturday, 17 March 2018 12:52:09 UTC, Peter Duncanson wrote:
On Sat, 17 Mar 2018 07:15:09 +0000, Robin wrote:

On 16/03/2018 16:43, Martin wrote:
On Fri, 16 Mar 2018 14:21:13 +0000, Clive Page wrote:

I'm also unclear about the application of the Regulation
to BBC services given they are not subscription based.
But I freely admit I've no idea if their status as
a "trader" for this has already been established.

I think broadcasters are affected by another matter: copyright.
My, very limited, understanding of copyright and other intellectual
property rights is that they are typically operated on a territorial
basis. So when a broadcaster pays to show a film or TV show it pays for
the right to show it in its own territory.


Sure, but the EU could class such restrictive contracts illegal, and demand that they are for the whole of the European Single Market or not at all.


But will the EU stump up the multi-million Euro cost of
building and launching a new satellite to increae the
coverage?

It's not like getting someone in to go up and swap the aerial
for a new one - unless you know someone with a very long
ladder - around 30,000 miles to get up to an object 22,236
miles above the equator!


Just use a bigger dish. 28E comes in on a 45cm dish in the UK (partly because of the tight beam). A 90cm dish should get it in say France and a 1.2m in Spain - Lyngsat etc. have coverage maps with signal strength 'obars' shown.


--

Terry


  #5  
Old April 3rd 18, 08:15 PM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
Bill Wright[_3_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 2,448
Default End of unjustifed geoblocking within EU

On 03/04/2018 19:17, Terry Casey wrote:

It's not like getting someone in to go up and swap the aerial
for a new one - unless you know someone with a very long
ladder - around 30,000 miles to get up to an object 22,236
miles above the equator!

It would take ages to climb up there. And what if you forgot your 10mm
spanner? I think I'd be looking at charging a bit extra.

Bill

  #6  
Old April 3rd 18, 08:20 PM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
Bill Wright[_3_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 2,448
Default End of unjustifed geoblocking within EU

On 03/04/2018 19:35, R. Mark Clayton wrote:

Just use a bigger dish. 28E comes in on a 45cm dish in the UK (partly because of the tight beam). A 90cm dish should get it in say France and a 1.2m in Spain - Lyngsat etc. have coverage maps with signal strength 'obars' shown.


In my experience confident predictions of reception of any sort are unwise.

Bill
  #7  
Old April 8th 18, 04:42 PM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
Tweed[_3_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 36
Default End of unjustifed geoblocking within EU



I'm also unclear about the application of the Regulation to BBC services
given they are not subscription based. But I freely admit I've no idea
if their status as a "trader" for this has already been established.

I think broadcasters are affected by another matter: copyright.
My, very limited, understanding of copyright and other intellectual
property rights is that they are typically operated on a territorial
basis. So when a broadcaster pays to show a film or TV show it pays for
the right to show it in its own territory.


BBC programmes are on Dutch and Belgian cable and Freesat is receivable in a
large part of Northern Europe

Interestingly (well to me at least) BBC satellite transmissions are easily
receiveable in Iceland. Seems the beam forgets to stop at Scotland and just
keeps on going....

  #8  
Old April 8th 18, 05:08 PM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
charles[_2_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 699
Default End of unjustifed geoblocking within EU

In article , Tweed wrote:


I'm also unclear about the application of the Regulation to BBC
services given they are not subscription based. But I freely admit
I've no idea if their status as a "trader" for this has already
been established.

I think broadcasters are affected by another matter: copyright. My,
very limited, understanding of copyright and other intellectual
property rights is that they are typically operated on a territorial
basis. So when a broadcaster pays to show a film or TV show it pays
for the right to show it in its own territory.


BBC programmes are on Dutch and Belgian cable and Freesat is
receivable in a large part of Northern Europe

Interestingly (well to me at least) BBC satellite transmissions are
easily receiveable in Iceland. Seems the beam forgets to stop at Scotland
and just keeps on going....


Not very surprising if you do some 3 dimensional geometry.

--
from KT24 in Surrey, England
"I'd rather die of exhaustion than die of boredom" Thomas Carlyle
  #9  
Old April 9th 18, 11:49 AM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
Bill Wright[_3_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 2,448
Default End of unjustifed geoblocking within EU

On 09/04/2018 10:05, Martin wrote:

Interestingly (well to me at least) BBC satellite transmissions are
easily receiveable in Iceland. Seems the beam forgets to stop at Scotland
and just keeps on going....


Not very surprising if you do some 3 dimensional geometry.


It is more than that. It depends on the satellite's antennas footprint too.


I think you miss Charles' point. As viewed from the satellite N Scotland
and S Iceland are very close together!

Bill
  #10  
Old April 9th 18, 11:59 AM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
R. Mark Clayton[_2_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 649
Default End of unjustifed geoblocking within EU

On Sunday, 8 April 2018 17:42:19 UTC+1, Tweed wrote:

I'm also unclear about the application of the Regulation to BBC services
given they are not subscription based. But I freely admit I've no idea
if their status as a "trader" for this has already been established.

I think broadcasters are affected by another matter: copyright.
My, very limited, understanding of copyright and other intellectual
property rights is that they are typically operated on a territorial
basis. So when a broadcaster pays to show a film or TV show it pays for
the right to show it in its own territory.


BBC programmes are on Dutch and Belgian cable


AIUI these are received on large terrestrial aerials on the coast and distributed by cable. Long predates mass market satellite.

and Freesat is receivable in a
large part of Northern Europe

Interestingly (well to me at least) BBC satellite transmissions are easily
receiveable in Iceland. Seems the beam forgets to stop at Scotland and just
keeps on going....


Yes - earth is well sort of round, so a beam from 0N 28E aimed at 5W 50 - 60N will have a large area of reduced strength coverage to the north east of its footprint.
 




Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

vB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Forum Jump


All times are GMT. The time now is 03:55 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.6.4
Copyright ©2000 - 2018, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.SEO by vBSEO 2.4.0
Copyright 2004-2018 Digital TV Banter.
The comments are property of their posters.