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uk.tech.digital-tv (Digital TV - General) (uk.tech.digital-tv) Discussion of all matters technical in origin related to the reception of digital television transmissions, be they via satellite, terrestrial or cable. Advertising is forbidden, with no exceptions.

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  #81  
Old March 23rd 18, 10:21 AM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
R. Mark Clayton[_2_]
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On Friday, 23 March 2018 10:56:36 UTC, Andrew wrote:
On 23/03/2018 10:11, NY wrote:
"Brian Gaff" wrote in message
news
Actually I liked school milk. None of that stupidity at our school it
was delivered early and¬* taken to the rooms on a trolley. Obviously
some schools were just rubbish at organising.


I'm sure my school was rubbish at organising. The crates of bottles were
taken outside during the last lesson before afternoon playtime (the
clinking noise meant "only another five minutes of this lesson") and you
then queued up to be handed a bottle when you wanted to have a good run
around and play tig or football or whatever, but instead were made to
queue up for puke-milk.

School milk tasted completely different to milk that the milkman
delivered in pint bottles - to the extent that I used to wonder if it
had extra vitamins added to aid the children's growth.


It was left-overs that had already passed its useful end of life and
on the verge of going sour. Any vitamins would have long gone.


I think they did add vitamins. Where I was it was the same.
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  #82  
Old March 23rd 18, 10:28 AM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
R. Mark Clayton[_2_]
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On Friday, 23 March 2018 11:16:03 UTC, Chris Green wrote:
Ian Jackson wrote:
In message , Chris Green
writes
Brian Gaff wrote:
Are you sure you folk are not mixing up condensed milk with evaporated
milk?
One is a power the other a liquid.

Surely *both* are liquid and come in tins, condensed milk in tins
being more of a cream and evaporated milk being more liquid.


Indeed. Condensed is quite runny, and is readily drinkable. Evaporated
is thick and rather treacly - and it's very sweet.


I thought it was the other way round


ditto. Google up.

but maybe that's simply different
brands calling them by different names.


Nestle made both.


--
Chris Green
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  #83  
Old March 23rd 18, 11:15 AM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
Andrew[_6_]
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On 23/03/2018 11:19, R. Mark Clayton wrote:
You did not HAVE to buy a wheeled shed, the P6 Rover 2000 and Triumph 2000 and variants had features like disk brakes etc. and whilst not cheap were nevertheless mass market UK built cars.


These were way out of the budget for most people in the 70's, most of
whom had no access to cheap loans, like today. They had to rely on HP
and other much more expensive forms of credit.
  #84  
Old March 23rd 18, 12:31 PM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
Max Demian
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On 23/03/2018 10:10, Chris Green wrote:
Brian Gaff wrote:
Are you sure you folk are not mixing up condensed milk with evaporated
milk?
One is a power the other a liquid.


Surely *both* are liquid and come in tins, condensed milk in tins
being more of a cream and evaporated milk being more liquid.


I'm surprised condensed milk (the sticky sweet kind - Nestlé Milk)
survived so long. Some cake and desert recipes specify it I think.
Apparently evaporated milk was widely available from the 1920s; I
remember it (Nestlé Ideal Milk or Carnation Milk) from the 1960s as
rather a novel item. Nice poured (neat) over fruit pies. I suppose you
could reconstitute it by mixing it with twice its volume of water, but
I've never known people to do that.

Condensed milk was popular added to tea or coffee (provided you take
sugar), when the only other form of preserved milk was powdered which
had to be blended with water and heated to reconstitute it - before
Marvel freeze-dried milk was produced.

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Max Demian
  #85  
Old March 23rd 18, 12:32 PM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
Max Demian
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On 22/03/2018 21:40, Brian Gaff wrote:
Can't ants swim then?


No they walk over a bridge of their comrades' dead bodies.

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Max Demian
  #87  
Old March 23rd 18, 01:31 PM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
Jeff Gaines
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On 23/03/2018 in message
Max Demian wrote:

I'm surprised condensed milk (the sticky sweet kind - Nestlé Milk)
survived so long


You need it to make coconut ice, fudge and Scotch tablet so it is an
essential commodity :-)

--
Jeff Gaines Wiltshire UK
By the time you can make ends meet they move the ends
  #88  
Old March 23rd 18, 03:16 PM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
Bill Wright[_3_]
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On 23/03/2018 10:10, Chris Green wrote:
Brian Gaff wrote:
Are you sure you folk are not mixing up condensed milk with evaporated
milk?
One is a power the other a liquid.


Surely *both* are liquid and come in tins, condensed milk in tins
being more of a cream and evaporated milk being more liquid.

Dried milk is, of course, evaporated but isn't generally called that.


Hil was a milk delivery person for a while in our student days. Since
she is 5ft 2ins I called her my condensed milk lady.

Bill
  #89  
Old March 23rd 18, 04:01 PM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
R. Mark Clayton[_2_]
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On Friday, 23 March 2018 14:26:46 UTC, Terry Casey wrote:
In article 0e61b636-961c-43e6-a0a2-c658605f3506
@googlegroups.com, says...


... the P6 Rover 2000 and Triumph 2000 and variants had
features like disk brakes ....


Ah yes, the days when other road users had to be warned about
the improved braking performance of the vehicle in front:
lorries with CAUTION-AIR BRAKES on the back and distinctive
oval signs saying DISCS on cars.

Back in those days a had a few moderately useful artistic
skills and a friend got me to make up a special sign for him
that said DRUMS. This he put on the back of his mother-in-
law's company car which he had sole use (it was her company!).

The car in question was a Vandenplas Princess with a 4 litre
Rolls Royce engine and, of course, disc brakes ...

A lad I worked with got me to make a sign for him to put on
the rear of his clapped out 5 cwt Ford van - it read CAUTION-
HYDRAULICALLY ASSISTED HANDBRAKE.



--

Terry

Indeed, modern cars with disk brakes, ABS, decent radial tyres can easily pull nearly a g in an emergency stop even in the wet.

Whilst the Highway Code's thinking distances are probably still valid [for a dozy driver] the stopping distances are nearly double what one is likely to achieve.

They also did a bean counters conversion to metric. So the 'old' imperial distances were V feet + V**2 feet / 20 feet (where V is in mph) so at 30mph it came out at 75 feet = 25 yards and 240 feet at 60mph. Now it is 23m and 73m!

This doesn't stop some thinking it is too little: -

https://www.independent.co.uk/news/u...-a7859061.html
although my reckoning is that if you are driving down the motorway and it takes you 1.5s to spot a hazard - you have hit it!
  #90  
Old March 23rd 18, 05:44 PM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
charles[_2_]
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In article , Mr. Marmite
wrote:
On Fri, 23 Mar 2018 10:16:11 -0000, "NY" wrote:


[snip]


She also remembered having to administer treacle to each child by
dipping a spoon in a huge jar, sticking it in the child's mouth for
them to lick it off, and then putting the same spoon back into the jar
for the next kid - the opportunities for diseases to be passed from one
child to the next must have been horrendous.

Yes, I can remember exactly the same procedure, but I'm sure it was malt
extract that was administered rather than treacle. Equally delicious,
though...


Virol

--
from KT24 in Surrey, England
 




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