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  #71  
Old March 23rd 18, 09:28 AM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
Ian Jackson[_7_]
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Posts: 104
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In message , Chris Green
writes
Brian Gaff wrote:
Are you sure you folk are not mixing up condensed milk with evaporated
milk?
One is a power the other a liquid.


Surely *both* are liquid and come in tins, condensed milk in tins
being more of a cream and evaporated milk being more liquid.


Indeed. Condensed is quite runny, and is readily drinkable. Evaporated
is thick and rather treacly - and it's very sweet.

Dried milk is, of course, evaporated but isn't generally called that.


--
Ian
Ads
  #72  
Old March 23rd 18, 09:29 AM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
Dave W
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Posts: 287
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On 23/03/2018 09:15, Roderick Stewart wrote:
On Thu, 22 Mar 2018 21:26:44 -0000, "Brian Gaff"
wrote:

A load of old tosh, like intelligence tests that really only showed up
whether you got bored faster or slower.


I used to do much better at "intelligence" tests than any other kind
of test, which I always put down to the fact that they were nearly
always of the multiple choice kind, rather than the usual ones that
required you to write something original, the worst requirement of all
being to write an essay. Having been taught to write with the wrong
hand, I was never keen on it, and wordprocessors with keyboards hadn't
been invented yet. I'm sure intelligence tests must measure something
or other but I've never been totally convinced that the results are as
meaningful as they're often held up to be. My teachers probably
wondered why such an intelligent person wrote such unreadable rubbish,
whenever he could be persuaded to write much at all. I think they had
me down as "intelligent but lazy".

Rod.

An intelligence test got me my first job in a TV development lab,
although I only had a third class degree in physics. I've always liked
puzzles, and ignored the instruction not to rush, and stop answering
when you got to a question you can't answer. No way! Knowing what was at
stake I went as fast as possible and always went on to the subsequent
questions to find out what the hell they were after, then go back and
answer the earlier one.
--
Dave W
  #73  
Old March 23rd 18, 09:47 AM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
Andrew[_6_]
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Posts: 88
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On 22/03/2018 22:05, R. Mark Clayton wrote:
and radios were optional...


A Ford anglia cost about £500 in the 60's and the heater
was an optional extra (about £12.10 shillings I think).
  #74  
Old March 23rd 18, 09:51 AM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
Andrew[_6_]
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Posts: 88
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On 23/03/2018 08:03, Woody wrote:
"R. Mark Clayton" wrote in message
...
On Thursday, 22 March 2018 20:45:55 UTC, James Heaton wrote:
"Bill Wright" wrote in message
news On 22/03/2018 01:33, Bill Wright wrote:
30 valves, 400watts, took two men to carry, then they had to
spend half
an afternoon setting up the convergence. But it was affected by
the
earth's magnetic field so if the customer moved the set at all
it all had
to be done again.
I'm so glad I lived long enough to escape from all that 1960s
****e.
Bloody cassette recorders and 33rpm LPs (one scratch and it's
****ed),
and AM radio and white bread that made a ball in your mouth and
made you
puke it out, and margarine was was like spreading a mixture of
lard and
engine oil on your ****ing white Mother's Pride bread, and Camp
'Coffee'
made from bloody acorns or something, and tinned condensed milk,
and
tyres that didn't last 5,000 miles, and vans that stopped if it
rained,
with no screenwashers or power steering or seat belts or
effective
heater, and a dynamo that produced 22A max so in winter you had
to
connect a battery charger overnight and...

Bill


Have you been on the Ribena
Never touch the stuff
Ice on the inside of the bedroom window, biking three miles to
school
through snowdrifts six feet high then getting thrashed for having
wet
clothes, going to the doctors and having to sit in a waiting room
on a
hard bench feeling giddy because of the fag smoke, then being
told your
rickets were growing pains

If you want a soundtrack to this thread, try 'Capstick comes home'
by Tony
Capstick...

Bill - 22A is 250w or so, if no decent heater what was pulling
enough out of
that to leave you with an uncharged battery?

James - who, on the last day of his 30s, has never had to worry
about such
things...!


poor 1960's cars (most of them) had dynamos rather than alternators
and quite often could not hack it in the winter.

such cars also lacked rear screen heaters, seat belts, power
steering, servo [disk] brakes, independent suspension... and radios
were optional...

Little wonder that despite a quarter of the cars now on the roads,
casualties were three or four times higher.


Not only those items above which in many cases didn't really come into
being until the mid/late 70's or later, but you also overlooked radial
ply tyres and - most of all and particularly in the original Mini -
the heater was an optional extra!




Not just the mini, and they were so feeble they barely had any effect,
zero effect for rear passengers, and if the car suffered from leaks
(which was about 90%+) all the heater did was steam up the windows.

Even worse were HGVs of the era. One 4 axle Scammell? was very common
on the roads. It had no power steering, so the drivers got plenty
of upper torso exercise negotiating roundabouts.
  #75  
Old March 23rd 18, 09:56 AM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
Andrew[_6_]
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Posts: 88
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On 23/03/2018 10:11, NY wrote:
"Brian Gaff" wrote in message
news
Actually I liked school milk. None of that stupidity at our school it
was delivered early and* taken to the rooms on a trolley. Obviously
some schools were just rubbish at organising.


I'm sure my school was rubbish at organising. The crates of bottles were
taken outside during the last lesson before afternoon playtime (the
clinking noise meant "only another five minutes of this lesson") and you
then queued up to be handed a bottle when you wanted to have a good run
around and play tig or football or whatever, but instead were made to
queue up for puke-milk.

School milk tasted completely different to milk that the milkman
delivered in pint bottles - to the extent that I used to wonder if it
had extra vitamins added to aid the children's growth.


It was left-overs that had already passed its useful end of life and
on the verge of going sour. Any vitamins would have long gone.
  #76  
Old March 23rd 18, 10:06 AM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
Norman Wells[_6_]
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Posts: 984
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On 23/03/2018 10:47, Andrew wrote:
On 22/03/2018 22:05, R. Mark Clayton wrote:
* and radios were optional...


A Ford anglia cost about £500 in the 60's and the heater
was an optional extra (about £12.10 shillings I think).


Or 'free' with the De Luxe model.
  #77  
Old March 23rd 18, 10:07 AM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
Andrew[_6_]
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Posts: 88
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On 22/03/2018 20:27, NY wrote:
The problem with modern smart TVs is that they don't display *anything*
on the screen for a long time. It would be dead easy to display
immediately a simple company logo, read from a ROM, to confirm that the
TV *has* received your "on" pulse from the remote and you don't need to
press the button again.


My Samsung always displays a logo immediately, and there is a menu
option to disable this. Has someone disabled your TVs poweron logo ?.
  #78  
Old March 23rd 18, 10:08 AM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
Norman Wells[_6_]
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Posts: 984
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On 23/03/2018 10:56, Andrew wrote:
On 23/03/2018 10:11, NY wrote:
"Brian Gaff" wrote in message
news
Actually I liked school milk. None of that stupidity at our school it
was delivered early and* taken to the rooms on a trolley. Obviously
some schools were just rubbish at organising.


I'm sure my school was rubbish at organising. The crates of bottles
were taken outside during the last lesson before afternoon playtime
(the clinking noise meant "only another five minutes of this lesson")
and you then queued up to be handed a bottle when you wanted to have a
good run around and play tig or football or whatever, but instead were
made to queue up for puke-milk.

School milk tasted completely different to milk that the milkman
delivered in pint bottles - to the extent that I used to wonder if it
had extra vitamins added to aid the children's growth.


It was left-overs that had already passed its useful end of life and
on the verge of going sour.


I doubt that very much.

Any vitamins would have long gone.


Not necessarily. But it wasn't for that, it was for the calcium 'for
healthy teeth and bones'.

  #79  
Old March 23rd 18, 10:09 AM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
Chris Green
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Posts: 178
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Ian Jackson wrote:
In message , Chris Green
writes
Brian Gaff wrote:
Are you sure you folk are not mixing up condensed milk with evaporated
milk?
One is a power the other a liquid.


Surely *both* are liquid and come in tins, condensed milk in tins
being more of a cream and evaporated milk being more liquid.


Indeed. Condensed is quite runny, and is readily drinkable. Evaporated
is thick and rather treacly - and it's very sweet.


I thought it was the other way round but maybe that's simply different
brands calling them by different names.

--
Chris Green
·
  #80  
Old March 23rd 18, 10:19 AM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
R. Mark Clayton[_2_]
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Posts: 649
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On Friday, 23 March 2018 08:03:32 UTC, Woody wrote:
"R. Mark Clayton" wrote in message
...
On Thursday, 22 March 2018 20:45:55 UTC, James Heaton wrote:
"Bill Wright" wrote in message
news On 22/03/2018 01:33, Bill Wright wrote:
30 valves, 400watts, took two men to carry, then they had to
spend half
an afternoon setting up the convergence. But it was affected by
the
earth's magnetic field so if the customer moved the set at all
it all had
to be done again.
I'm so glad I lived long enough to escape from all that 1960s
****e.
Bloody cassette recorders and 33rpm LPs (one scratch and it's
****ed),
and AM radio and white bread that made a ball in your mouth and
made you
puke it out, and margarine was was like spreading a mixture of
lard and
engine oil on your ****ing white Mother's Pride bread, and Camp
'Coffee'
made from bloody acorns or something, and tinned condensed milk,
and
tyres that didn't last 5,000 miles, and vans that stopped if it
rained,
with no screenwashers or power steering or seat belts or
effective
heater, and a dynamo that produced 22A max so in winter you had
to
connect a battery charger overnight and...

Bill


Have you been on the Ribena
Never touch the stuff
Ice on the inside of the bedroom window, biking three miles to
school
through snowdrifts six feet high then getting thrashed for having
wet
clothes, going to the doctors and having to sit in a waiting room
on a
hard bench feeling giddy because of the fag smoke, then being
told your
rickets were growing pains

If you want a soundtrack to this thread, try 'Capstick comes home'
by Tony
Capstick...

Bill - 22A is 250w or so, if no decent heater what was pulling
enough out of
that to leave you with an uncharged battery?

James - who, on the last day of his 30s, has never had to worry
about such
things...!


poor 1960's cars (most of them) had dynamos rather than alternators
and quite often could not hack it in the winter.

such cars also lacked rear screen heaters, seat belts, power
steering, servo [disk] brakes, independent suspension... and radios
were optional...

Little wonder that despite a quarter of the cars now on the roads,
casualties were three or four times higher.


Not only those items above which in many cases didn't really come into
being until the mid/late 70's or later, but you also overlooked radial
ply tyres and - most of all and particularly in the original Mini -
the heater was an optional extra!


The OP mentioned [cross ply] tyres that wore out in 5,000 miles.

I did miss off synchromesh.

You did not HAVE to buy a wheeled shed, the P6 Rover 2000 and Triumph 2000 and variants had features like disk brakes etc. and whilst not cheap were nevertheless mass market UK built cars.



--
Woody

harrogate3 at ntlworld dot com


 




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