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uk.tech.digital-tv (Digital TV - General) (uk.tech.digital-tv) Discussion of all matters technical in origin related to the reception of digital television transmissions, be they via satellite, terrestrial or cable. Advertising is forbidden, with no exceptions.

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  #51  
Old March 22nd 18, 08:18 PM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
Brian Gaff
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Actually I liked school milk. None of that stupidity at our school it was
delivered early and taken to the rooms on a trolley. Obviously some schools
were just rubbish at organising.

Brian

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"Peter Johnson" wrote in message
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On Thu, 22 Mar 2018 09:42:54 -0000, "NY" wrote:



Warm, semi-sour milk in 1/3 pint bottles at school - my infant school
(last
60s) served it in the *afternoon* playtime, after it had had all day at
room
temperature to go off. I remember a mate of mine who said to the teacher
"why don't do just pour it down the loo" - since that's where it will go
anyway since most people puked straight afterwards.


Andin winter left outside to freeze. School milk put me off drinking
it for many years.
Also parking leights that had to be left on on cars parked in the
street overnight, running down the battery.



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  #52  
Old March 22nd 18, 08:21 PM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
Brian Gaff
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Yes a compromise. most Sonys these days are based on Android which makes it
easier for them to make a talking tv of course.
brian

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"Max Demian" wrote in message
o.uk...
On 22/03/2018 13:05, Jeff Layman wrote:
On 22/03/18 09:42, NY wrote:

Televisions and radios that took ages to "warm up". (Mind you, today's
smart
TVs take as long as a valve TV used to do, because they have to boot
up.)


TVs used to take so long they introduced "instant start" TVs that left the
heaters of the tube (and valves if any) on when you switched them off.
Unfortunately they didn't tell users, and after a few fires people decided
you had to unplug them at night from the mains (and probably the aerial in
case of a thunderstorm). This practise continued for decades after instant
start TVs were discontinued.

In 1978 I bought a Sony which started up in 5 seconds - but later CRT TVs
weren't quite so quick - more like 10-15 seconds until the LCD TVs came
out.

My Panny "smart TV" starts pretty quickly - quicker than the previous
non-smart model. But that's only for OTA stuff. If I want to use the
internet to catch up or watch YouTube on it, etc, then I do have to wait
quite a bit longer.


With my current (2012) Sony, you can do basic things like channel up or
down straight away, but anything "complicated" like selecting a channel by
number or selecting the AV input you have to wait a bit. After switching
it to standby it waits for 7.5 minutes before it's actually in standby -
until then it will start up instantly.

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Max Demian



  #57  
Old March 22nd 18, 08:36 PM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
Brian Gaff
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I never liked the 1100, as they sort of bounced and wallowed and also seemed
to get holes in the floor a lot.

We had an 1800, and that was a fabulous car.

I found it a very nice ride for passengers.
The other car we had that I liked was a Consul Classic, but my father had
problems on motorways with steering column vibration even when it had had
all its steering components checked and the wheels balanced.I think the
whole system had a resonance problem, but apart from that a nice car to be
in.
many here talk of rolling cars over, OK this may be better now, but I doubt
if most car makers considered that people would be reckless enough to roll
them. How times have changed.
Brian

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"Chris Green" wrote in message
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Andrew wrote:
On 22/03/2018 08:55, Brian Gaff wrote:
or the Mini that was so close to the ground that
you often hit the road or their hydrolastic suspension that was always
losing pressure and thumping you down with no springs.


Minis never had hydrolastic suspension. 1100's and 1800's had
that. They did wear out their rear radius arm bearings so that
the car adopted rear-wheel steering when you went round a bend.

Well according to Wikipedia (not necessarily always right but usually
OK):-

"The short development time of the car meant this was not ready in
time for the Mini's launch. The system intended for the Mini was
further developed and the hydrolastic system was first used on the
Morris 1100, launched in 1962; the Mini gained the system later in 1964"

So minis from 1964 were hydrolastic.

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Chris Green



  #58  
Old March 22nd 18, 08:39 PM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
Brian Gaff
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I think our 1800, had undersea and rust was not a problem. In the end I
think we only sold it as we needed the money for a motor caravan, which,
sadly we only had a couple of seasons use out of due to my father having a
heart attack.
Brian

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"Chris J Dixon" wrote in message
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Andrew wrote:

Minis never had hydrolastic suspension. 1100's and 1800's had
that. They did wear out their rear radius arm bearings so that
the car adopted rear-wheel steering when you went round a bend.


When I inherited my Dad's Austin 1800, in many ways it was a step
up from my Beetle, but it was quite old, and the gears became
troublesome, some were unselectable with a cold engine. Much
tinkering with the cable linkage had no effect.

The fix came serendipitously when I put in a different multigrade
engine oil, as it also lubricates the gearbox.

My dad had it re sprayed in "Rover" brown. Its sills still rusted
through, so jacking was a bit tricky. Very heavy steering - multi
storey car parks were a trial.

Then there was the time it was sitting down on the offside, so I
asked them to pump up the suspension. Turned out the engine mount
had failed, and its downward progress had been arrested by the
shearing off of a pipe stub on the main hydrolastic unit :-(

When I came to trade it in, the battery terminals were a bit
dodgy, and it wouldn't turn over when I tried to start it for the
salesman to value. I lifted the bonnet and pushed the solenoid, a
handy facility in simpler times, and it burst into life. Salesman
bemused - turned out he had only just taken the job, previously
being a golf pro, and clearly knew less about cars than I did
about golf.

Chris
--
Chris J Dixon Nottingham UK


Plant amazing Acers.



 




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