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uk.tech.digital-tv (Digital TV - General) (uk.tech.digital-tv) Discussion of all matters technical in origin related to the reception of digital television transmissions, be they via satellite, terrestrial or cable. Advertising is forbidden, with no exceptions.

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  #41  
Old March 22nd 18, 06:49 PM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
Max Demian
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On 22/03/2018 13:05, Jeff Layman wrote:
On 22/03/18 09:42, NY wrote:

Televisions and radios that took ages to "warm up". (Mind you, today's
smart
TVs take as long as a valve TV used to do, because they have to boot up.)


TVs used to take so long they introduced "instant start" TVs that left
the heaters of the tube (and valves if any) on when you switched them
off. Unfortunately they didn't tell users, and after a few fires people
decided you had to unplug them at night from the mains (and probably the
aerial in case of a thunderstorm). This practise continued for decades
after instant start TVs were discontinued.

In 1978 I bought a Sony which started up in 5 seconds - but later CRT
TVs weren't quite so quick - more like 10-15 seconds until the LCD TVs
came out.

My Panny "smart TV" starts pretty quickly - quicker than the previous
non-smart model. But that's only for OTA stuff. If I want to use the
internet to catch up or watch YouTube on it, etc, then I do have to wait
quite a bit longer.


With my current (2012) Sony, you can do basic things like channel up or
down straight away, but anything "complicated" like selecting a channel
by number or selecting the AV input you have to wait a bit. After
switching it to standby it waits for 7.5 minutes before it's actually in
standby - until then it will start up instantly.

--
Max Demian
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  #42  
Old March 22nd 18, 06:59 PM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
Bill Wright[_3_]
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On 22/03/2018 19:49, Max Demian wrote:

With my current (2012) Sony, you can do basic things like channel up or
down straight away, but anything "complicated" like selecting a channel
by number or selecting the AV input you have to wait a bit. After
switching it to standby it waits for 7.5 minutes before it's actually in
standby - until then it will start up instantly.


And mine sends a pulse of noise from its headphone socket at the 7.5
minute point.

Bill
  #43  
Old March 22nd 18, 07:17 PM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
NY
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"Brian Gaff" wrote in message
news
I have a valve amplifier on my pc, and it normally warms up faster than
the pc boots up.


I can believe that. My main PC is used (amongst other things) for logging
data from my weather station at 10-minute intervals. If I need to reboot the
PC, I have to do so *immediately* it has taken one reading, so the PC will
have shutdown and rebooted and restarted the weather station application
before the next reading is due 10 minutes later. 10 minutes to shut down and
reboot is not good :-( If the reboot involves any Windows updates, then all
bets are off...

  #44  
Old March 22nd 18, 07:27 PM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
NY
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"Max Demian" wrote in message
o.uk...
On 22/03/2018 13:05, Jeff Layman wrote:
On 22/03/18 09:42, NY wrote:

Televisions and radios that took ages to "warm up". (Mind you, today's
smart
TVs take as long as a valve TV used to do, because they have to boot
up.)


TVs used to take so long they introduced "instant start" TVs that left the
heaters of the tube (and valves if any) on when you switched them off.
Unfortunately they didn't tell users, and after a few fires people decided
you had to unplug them at night from the mains (and probably the aerial in
case of a thunderstorm). This practise continued for decades after instant
start TVs were discontinued.

In 1978 I bought a Sony which started up in 5 seconds - but later CRT TVs
weren't quite so quick - more like 10-15 seconds until the LCD TVs came
out.


The problem with modern smart TVs is that they don't display *anything* on
the screen for a long time. It would be dead easy to display immediately a
simple company logo, read from a ROM, to confirm that the TV *has* received
your "on" pulse from the remote and you don't need to press the button
again.

The one that my parents have at their holiday cottage where my wife and I
are currently living (sold old house and haven't get found a new house)
waits about 15 seconds, which is a long time when you are staring at a blank
screen wondering if it's going to come on, then displays the logo for a
second or so, and then starts displaying the last channel that it had been
showing before shutdown.

Another quibble I have with modern TVs is the long pause when switching
between one SCART or HDMI input and another, which is frustrating when you
want to go from input 1 to input 4 and can only do so cyclically via 2 and
3.

  #45  
Old March 22nd 18, 07:43 PM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
James Heaton
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"Graham." wrote in message
...
In article , Graham.
wrote:
In article , Jeff Gaines
wrote:
On 22/03/2018 in message
NY wrote:

Cars with chokes: if you push the choke in a bit too soon, the
engine
loses power or stalls altogether

Used by many lady drivers as a useful hook to hang their bags on :-)

In the same way that the CD drive tray on PC's could be used as a cup
holder. There was even a program for the Archimedes called (ISTR)
"coffee" to put the tray out.


In order to distinguish the new Arc from the old Model "B", the school
janitor would typically be asked for the "CD ROM" to be wheeled in.


That was a video disc. Domesday Project?


As it happens I was involved with the Domesday Project, I can't
remember it being deployed to Archimedes, I remember BBC Masters and
separate Phillips Laservision machines, (with a real He-Ne laser).


That's all online now, it's really interesting. Have wasted a couple of
hours on there...

James


  #46  
Old March 22nd 18, 07:45 PM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
James Heaton
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"Bill Wright" wrote in message
news
On 22/03/2018 01:33, Bill Wright wrote:
30 valves, 400watts, took two men to carry, then they had to spend half
an afternoon setting up the convergence. But it was affected by the
earth's magnetic field so if the customer moved the set at all it all had
to be done again.
I'm so glad I lived long enough to escape from all that 1960s ****e.
Bloody cassette recorders and 33rpm LPs (one scratch and it's ****ed),
and AM radio and white bread that made a ball in your mouth and made you
puke it out, and margarine was was like spreading a mixture of lard and
engine oil on your ****ing white Mother's Pride bread, and Camp 'Coffee'
made from bloody acorns or something, and tinned condensed milk, and
tyres that didn't last 5,000 miles, and vans that stopped if it rained,
with no screenwashers or power steering or seat belts or effective
heater, and a dynamo that produced 22A max so in winter you had to
connect a battery charger overnight and...

Bill



Have you been on the Ribena
Never touch the stuff
Ice on the inside of the bedroom window, biking three miles to school
through snowdrifts six feet high then getting thrashed for having wet
clothes, going to the doctors and having to sit in a waiting room on a
hard bench feeling giddy because of the fag smoke, then being told your
rickets were growing pains


If you want a soundtrack to this thread, try 'Capstick comes home' by Tony
Capstick...

Bill - 22A is 250w or so, if no decent heater what was pulling enough out of
that to leave you with an uncharged battery?

James - who, on the last day of his 30s, has never had to worry about such
things...!

  #47  
Old March 22nd 18, 08:00 PM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
Brian Gaff
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Posts: 7,250
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One thing I never could understand though was why HP decided to make an all
in one computer with the motherboard in the monitor then mount the cd drive
vertically so it was very hard to get it to stay in as the drawer closed and
it normally fell on the floor when it was ejected and rolled across the
floor.
Brian

--
----- -
This newsgroup posting comes to you directly from...
The Sofa of Brian Gaff...

Blind user, so no pictures please!
"Jim Lesurf" wrote in message
...
In article , charles
wrote:

In the same way that the CD drive tray on PC's could be used as a cup
holder. There was even a program for the Archimedes called (ISTR)
"coffee" to put the tray out.


Pah! Someone fitted a 'Pizza [email protected] slice to a RiscPC. 8-]

Jim

--
Please use the address on the audiomisc page if you wish to email me.
Electronics
https://www.st-andrews.ac.uk/~www_pa...o/electron.htm
biog http://jcgl.orpheusweb.co.uk/history/ups_and_downs.html
Audio Misc http://www.audiomisc.co.uk/index.html



  #49  
Old March 22nd 18, 08:12 PM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
Brian Gaff
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Yes that is right. Also you might be surprised to learn that Pioneer made a
laserdisc player you could interface to a pc for audio visual stuff. There
was a driver in Windows XP for it and probably earlier windows too.
Now unfortunately the only way to play those CD sized gold singles video
track is on a real laserdisc player. The normal dvd drives have no support
for that format.
Brian

--
----- -
This newsgroup posting comes to you directly from...
The Sofa of Brian Gaff...

Blind user, so no pictures please!
"Graham." wrote in message
...
In article , Graham.
wrote:
In article , Jeff Gaines
wrote:
On 22/03/2018 in message
NY wrote:

Cars with chokes: if you push the choke in a bit too soon, the
engine
loses power or stalls altogether

Used by many lady drivers as a useful hook to hang their bags on :-)

In the same way that the CD drive tray on PC's could be used as a cup
holder. There was even a program for the Archimedes called (ISTR)
"coffee" to put the tray out.


In order to distinguish the new Arc from the old Model "B", the school
janitor would typically be asked for the "CD ROM" to be wheeled in.


That was a video disc. Domesday Project?


As it happens I was involved with the Domesday Project, I can't
remember it being deployed to Archimedes, I remember BBC Masters and
separate Phillips Laservision machines, (with a real He-Ne laser).
--

Graham.
%Profound_observation%



  #50  
Old March 22nd 18, 08:16 PM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
Brian Gaff
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Posts: 7,250
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Yes the interesting thing of course about the discs is that many were cav
not csv, so if you looked at the disc you could clearly see the start and
end of the frame data. Of course as things altered over the years and some
digital sound instead of fm was used you started on the slippery slope of
surround sound etc where we find ourselves now on dvds and blue rays.
Brian

--
----- -
This newsgroup posting comes to you directly from...
The Sofa of Brian Gaff...

Blind user, so no pictures please!
"James Heaton" wrote in message
news

"Graham." wrote in message
...
In article , Graham.
wrote:
In article , Jeff Gaines
wrote:
On 22/03/2018 in message
NY wrote:

Cars with chokes: if you push the choke in a bit too soon, the
engine
loses power or stalls altogether

Used by many lady drivers as a useful hook to hang their bags on :-)

In the same way that the CD drive tray on PC's could be used as a cup
holder. There was even a program for the Archimedes called (ISTR)
"coffee" to put the tray out.

In order to distinguish the new Arc from the old Model "B", the school
janitor would typically be asked for the "CD ROM" to be wheeled in.

That was a video disc. Domesday Project?


As it happens I was involved with the Domesday Project, I can't
remember it being deployed to Archimedes, I remember BBC Masters and
separate Phillips Laservision machines, (with a real He-Ne laser).


That's all online now, it's really interesting. Have wasted a couple of
hours on there...

James




 




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