A Sky, cable and digital tv forum. Digital TV Banter

If this is your first visit, be sure to check out the FAQ by clicking the link above. You may have to register before you can post: click the register link above to proceed. To start viewing messages, select the forum that you want to visit from the selection below.

Go Back   Home » Digital TV Banter forum » Digital TV Newsgroups » uk.tech.digital-tv (Digital TV - General)
Site Map Home Register Authors List Search Today's Posts Mark Forums Read Web Partners

uk.tech.digital-tv (Digital TV - General) (uk.tech.digital-tv) Discussion of all matters technical in origin related to the reception of digital television transmissions, be they via satellite, terrestrial or cable. Advertising is forbidden, with no exceptions.

from another group



 
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
  #31  
Old March 22nd 18, 02:33 PM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
Chris Bartram[_2_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 7
Default from another group

On 22/03/2018 15:03, Chris Green wrote:
Chris Green wrote:
Andrew wrote:
On 22/03/2018 08:55, Brian Gaff wrote:
or the Mini that was so close to the ground that
you often hit the road or their hydrolastic suspension that was always
losing pressure and thumping you down with no springs.

Minis never had hydrolastic suspension. 1100's and 1800's had
that. They did wear out their rear radius arm bearings so that
the car adopted rear-wheel steering when you went round a bend.

So minis from 1964 were hydrolastic.

Further reading shows that they reverted to rubber suspension:-

That's correct.
Ads
  #32  
Old March 22nd 18, 04:03 PM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
Graham.[_12_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 472
Default from another group

In article , Graham.
wrote:
In article , Jeff Gaines
wrote:
On 22/03/2018 in message
NY wrote:

Cars with chokes: if you push the choke in a bit too soon, the engine
loses power or stalls altogether

Used by many lady drivers as a useful hook to hang their bags on :-)

In the same way that the CD drive tray on PC's could be used as a cup
holder. There was even a program for the Archimedes called (ISTR)
"coffee" to put the tray out.


In order to distinguish the new Arc from the old Model "B", the school
janitor would typically be asked for the "CD ROM" to be wheeled in.


That was a video disc. Domesday Project?


As it happens I was involved with the Domesday Project, I can't
remember it being deployed to Archimedes, I remember BBC Masters and
separate Phillips Laservision machines, (with a real He-Ne laser).
--

Graham.
%Profound_observation%
  #33  
Old March 22nd 18, 04:25 PM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
Andrew[_6_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 88
Default from another group

On 22/03/2018 15:05, Chris J Dixon wrote:
though the
fastidious could use a jam jar, as these were coming off the line
at 2 per second.


You must have had asbestos lips :-)
  #34  
Old March 22nd 18, 06:22 PM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
Brian Gaff
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 7,250
Default from another group

A friend of mine has 2 xms in his garden, both have problems.
I bet his neighbours love him.
Brian

--
----- -
This newsgroup posting comes to you directly from...
The Sofa of Brian Gaff...

Blind user, so no pictures please!
"Chris Green" wrote in message
...
Brian Gaff wrote:
They were the later ones that used rubber I think you will find the early
ones all had the fluid system similar to those raising and lowering
French
jobbies with dodgy wiring looms.


No, the original minis were rubber suspension, it was the 1100 that
introduced hydrolastic and that was then put into the later minis.

I had a 1962 mini and that was definitely rubber cones, the mini was
ony introduced in 1959 if I remember right.

... and the 1100 hydorlastic was not much like the Citroen suspension,
it didn't pump up and down and I dont *think* it had spheres like the
Citroens did (and still do, though only C5 Exclusive now I think).

Later Citroens are much more reliable, we had several XMs, which were
OK but not brilliant electrically, we then had a 2005 C5 which was
excellent, we only just got rid of it, still reliable at 175000 miles.
We now have a C5 and a C6. (Citroen enthusiasts? No, of course not!)

--
Chris Green



  #35  
Old March 22nd 18, 06:33 PM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
Brian Gaff
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 7,250
Default from another group

1 I still get milk in glass pint bottles delivered. There was an outcry and
dairycrest, now taken over by Muller, decided to keep bottling in glass for
recycling reasons.
I have a valve amplifier on my pc, and it normally warms up faster than the
pc boots up.
The most interesting tvs were at the start of colour.
Because my father worked in the trade, we used to be used to test the sets.
We tested Decca. You needed a bag of fuses for those.
Sobell, all semiconductor and very reliable, except for all the connectors
and edge connectors that went intermittent.
Baird and Bush, notable for their use of neon's as voltage stabilisers and
so many valves that you lost count. oh and the need to retrofit a lead
shield under the line output valve holder as a fault condition sent x rays
through the bottom of the set where Kitty used to sleep. Since all our cats
were desexed, I doubt it made much difference.
Brian

--
----- -
This newsgroup posting comes to you directly from...
The Sofa of Brian Gaff...

Blind user, so no pictures please!
"NY" wrote in message
o.uk...
"Brian Gaff" wrote in message
news
Oh dear I wonder what they think were the good times then.
It was not the convergence but the purity that was affected by magnetic
fields and it was usually not the earth that was to blame it was a
speaker or somewhere a lump of iron.
They did not mention windscreen wipers that operated from the vacuum of
the engine pistons though did they, or trafficators that were mechanical
arms with bulbs in to indicate which way you were turning that used to
shoot off when the screw got loose, or the Mini that was so close to the
ground that you often hit the road or their hydrolastic suspension that
was always losing pressure and thumping you down with no springs.
Then there was of course dripping in the fridge which gran kept for years
and spread it on bread.
How many people grease their hair now and need an antimacaser on the sofa
to stop it staining where the head rests and those sausage shaped things
we had to put under doors to stop the draughts in winter etc.
Those were the good old days them were.


Televisions and radios that took ages to "warm up". (Mind you, today's
smart TVs take as long as a valve TV used to do, because they have to boot
up.)

Rust on car bodies (the last car I had with rust was a 1980 Renault 5. My
last two cars have got to 10 years old with no sign of rust.)

Cars with chokes: if you push the choke in a bit too soon, the engine
loses power or stalls altogether as soon as you try to pull out of a
junction, even though it's been running fine until then,)

Stupid seat belts in 2-door cars where the belt is about 10 miles long and
is anchored somewhere beside the rear seat instead of being anchored at
shoulder height on the B pillar. My grandpa's Hillman Avenger was like
that and my grandma would always get her feet caught up in it when she got
in the back to let me sit in the front: she insisted that even when I was
little, "a man's place is in the front".

Mechanical pump-action windscreen washer controls (no electric pump)

Milk delivered in glass bottles: if the milkman dropped one, you knew it
was going to be a long job sweeping all the little bits up before dad got
home and the glass punctured his tyres.

Warm, semi-sour milk in 1/3 pint bottles at school - my infant school
(last 60s) served it in the *afternoon* playtime, after it had had all day
at room temperature to go off. I remember a mate of mine who said to the
teacher "why don't do just pour it down the loo" - since that's where it
will go anyway since most people puked straight afterwards.



  #36  
Old March 22nd 18, 06:35 PM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
Brian Gaff
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 7,250
Default from another group

So it was not a Hinkle or a mesch.. thingy, it was in fact made by isetta
who made the scooters.
Brian

--
----- -
This newsgroup posting comes to you directly from...
The Sofa of Brian Gaff...

Blind user, so no pictures please!
"Graham." wrote in message
...
My neighbour had a clothes peg on the mini choke cable to keep it out a
bit
at all times.

Does anyone remember those three wheelers with the door on the front?
I had a ride in one of those, you felt like you were being a crash test
dummy in traffic.
Brian


You could shoot at Triumph Spitfires from one of those.

--

Graham.
%Profound_observation%



  #38  
Old March 22nd 18, 06:39 PM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
Brian Gaff
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 7,250
Default from another group

There is a bloke who has found a load of old floppy drives and made a midi
controlled instrument out of them. The notes are different speeds on the
stepper motors.
brian

--
----- -
This newsgroup posting comes to you directly from...
The Sofa of Brian Gaff...

Blind user, so no pictures please!
"charles" wrote in message
...
In article ,
Jeff Gaines wrote:
On 22/03/2018 in message
NY wrote:


Cars with chokes: if you push the choke in a bit too soon, the engine
loses power or stalls altogether


Used by many lady drivers as a useful hook to hang their bags on :-)


In the same way that the CD drive tray on PC's could be used as a cup
holder. There was even a program for the Archimedes called (ISTR)
"coffee"
to put the tray out.

--
from KT24 in Surrey, England



  #39  
Old March 22nd 18, 06:40 PM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
Andrew[_6_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 88
Default from another group

On 22/03/2018 19:33, Brian Gaff wrote:
There was an outcry and
dairycrest, now taken over by Muller, decided to keep bottling in glass for
recycling reasons.


DairyCrest only sold their liquid milk business to Muller who had
already bought Robert Wiseman dairies.

DC still make and sell cheese, and powdered milk products
including infant fomulae
  #40  
Old March 22nd 18, 06:41 PM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
Phil M[_2_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 8
Default from another group

On 22/03/2018 15:33, Chris Bartram wrote:
On 22/03/2018 15:03, Chris Green wrote:
Chris Green wrote:
Andrew wrote:
On 22/03/2018 08:55, Brian Gaff wrote:
or the Mini that was so close to the ground that
you often hit the road or their hydrolastic suspension that was always
losing pressure and thumping you down with no springs.

Minis never had hydrolastic suspension. 1100's and 1800's had
that. They did wear out their rear radius arm bearings so that
the car adopted rear-wheel steering when you went round a bend.

So minis from 1964 were hydrolastic.

Further reading shows that they reverted to rubber suspension:-

That's correct.

I had an "H" reg mini on which the right side depressurized - made going
round right hand bends much faster. It was also negative earth with an
old positive earth wiring loom.

Phil M

 




Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

vB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Forum Jump


All times are GMT. The time now is 08:08 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.6.4
Copyright ©2000 - 2018, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.SEO by vBSEO 2.4.0
Copyright 2004-2018 Digital TV Banter.
The comments are property of their posters.