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uk.tech.digital-tv (Digital TV - General) (uk.tech.digital-tv) Discussion of all matters technical in origin related to the reception of digital television transmissions, be they via satellite, terrestrial or cable. Advertising is forbidden, with no exceptions.

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  #21  
Old March 22nd 18, 01:00 PM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
Graham.[_12_]
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In article ,
Jeff Gaines wrote:
On 22/03/2018 in message
NY wrote:


Cars with chokes: if you push the choke in a bit too soon, the engine
loses power or stalls altogether


Used by many lady drivers as a useful hook to hang their bags on :-)


In the same way that the CD drive tray on PC's could be used as a cup
holder. There was even a program for the Archimedes called (ISTR) "coffee"
to put the tray out.


In order to distinguish the new Arc from the old Model "B", the school
janitor would typically be asked for the "CD ROM" to be wheeled in.
--

Graham.
%Profound_observation%
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  #22  
Old March 22nd 18, 01:08 PM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
charles[_2_]
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In article ,
Andrew wrote:
On 22/03/2018 01:33, Bill Wright wrote:
and Camp 'Coffee' made from bloody acorns or something, and tinned
condensed milk,


But Camp coffee was useful for adding to cold milk in hot weather.


Tinned condensed milk is a godsend for Indians who make indian
sweets that have very high levels of sugar. Previously it used to
take days to make them from scratch.


And those parts of the world where people have no fridges use
a lot of tinned condensed milk. After opening you have to
stand the tin in a saucer of water to keep the ants out of it.


also, bear in mind that it was "a little something" to winnie the Poh.

--
from KT24 in Surrey, England
  #23  
Old March 22nd 18, 01:08 PM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
Graham.[_12_]
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My neighbour had a clothes peg on the mini choke cable to keep it out a bit
at all times.

Does anyone remember those three wheelers with the door on the front?
I had a ride in one of those, you felt like you were being a crash test
dummy in traffic.
Brian


You could shoot at Triumph Spitfires from one of those.

--

Graham.
%Profound_observation%
  #24  
Old March 22nd 18, 01:10 PM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
charles[_2_]
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In article ,
Andrew wrote:
On 22/03/2018 08:55, Brian Gaff wrote:
or the Mini that was so close to the ground that
you often hit the road or their hydrolastic suspension that was always
losing pressure and thumping you down with no springs.


Minis never had hydrolastic suspension. 1100's and 1800's had
that. They did wear out their rear radius arm bearings so that
the car adopted rear-wheel steering when you went round a bend.


Minis and 1100s had the ignition key in the centre where
your knee would hit it in a crash (no seat belts of course).


I worked in a hospital path lab in the 70's and A&E staff
knew what make of car the victim was driving, or a passenger
because the key was frequently embedded in the remains of their
knee joint.


The door locks were so flimsy that the doors flew open after a
rollover crash, which also bashed off the petrol filler cap,
spraying petrol like a catherine wheel.


and the feeder cable from the battery to the engine compartment ran under
the body, land on a severe bump and the lights went out.

--
from KT24 in Surrey, England
  #25  
Old March 22nd 18, 01:11 PM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
charles[_2_]
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In article , Graham.
wrote:
In article , Jeff Gaines
wrote:
On 22/03/2018 in message
NY wrote:


Cars with chokes: if you push the choke in a bit too soon, the engine
loses power or stalls altogether


Used by many lady drivers as a useful hook to hang their bags on :-)


In the same way that the CD drive tray on PC's could be used as a cup
holder. There was even a program for the Archimedes called (ISTR)
"coffee" to put the tray out.


In order to distinguish the new Arc from the old Model "B", the school
janitor would typically be asked for the "CD ROM" to be wheeled in.


That was a video disc. Domesday Project?

--
from KT24 in Surrey, England
  #26  
Old March 22nd 18, 01:36 PM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
Chris Green
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Andrew wrote:
On 22/03/2018 08:55, Brian Gaff wrote:
or the Mini that was so close to the ground that
you often hit the road or their hydrolastic suspension that was always
losing pressure and thumping you down with no springs.


Minis never had hydrolastic suspension. 1100's and 1800's had
that. They did wear out their rear radius arm bearings so that
the car adopted rear-wheel steering when you went round a bend.

Well according to Wikipedia (not necessarily always right but usually
OK):-

"The short development time of the car meant this was not ready in
time for the Mini's launch. The system intended for the Mini was
further developed and the hydrolastic system was first used on the
Morris 1100, launched in 1962; the Mini gained the system later in 1964"

So minis from 1964 were hydrolastic.

--
Chris Green
·
  #27  
Old March 22nd 18, 02:02 PM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
Chris J Dixon
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Andrew wrote:

Minis never had hydrolastic suspension. 1100's and 1800's had
that. They did wear out their rear radius arm bearings so that
the car adopted rear-wheel steering when you went round a bend.


When I inherited my Dad's Austin 1800, in many ways it was a step
up from my Beetle, but it was quite old, and the gears became
troublesome, some were unselectable with a cold engine. Much
tinkering with the cable linkage had no effect.

The fix came serendipitously when I put in a different multigrade
engine oil, as it also lubricates the gearbox.

My dad had it re sprayed in "Rover" brown. Its sills still rusted
through, so jacking was a bit tricky. Very heavy steering - multi
storey car parks were a trial.

Then there was the time it was sitting down on the offside, so I
asked them to pump up the suspension. Turned out the engine mount
had failed, and its downward progress had been arrested by the
shearing off of a pipe stub on the main hydrolastic unit :-(

When I came to trade it in, the battery terminals were a bit
dodgy, and it wouldn't turn over when I tried to start it for the
salesman to value. I lifted the bonnet and pushed the solenoid, a
handy facility in simpler times, and it burst into life. Salesman
bemused - turned out he had only just taken the job, previously
being a golf pro, and clearly knew less about cars than I did
about golf.

Chris
--
Chris J Dixon Nottingham UK


Plant amazing Acers.
  #28  
Old March 22nd 18, 02:03 PM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
Chris Green
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Chris Green wrote:
Andrew wrote:
On 22/03/2018 08:55, Brian Gaff wrote:
or the Mini that was so close to the ground that
you often hit the road or their hydrolastic suspension that was always
losing pressure and thumping you down with no springs.


Minis never had hydrolastic suspension. 1100's and 1800's had
that. They did wear out their rear radius arm bearings so that
the car adopted rear-wheel steering when you went round a bend.

Well according to Wikipedia (not necessarily always right but usually
OK):-

"The short development time of the car meant this was not ready in
time for the Mini's launch. The system intended for the Mini was
further developed and the hydrolastic system was first used on the
Morris 1100, launched in 1962; the Mini gained the system later in 1964"

So minis from 1964 were hydrolastic.

Further reading shows that they reverted to rubber suspension:-

"In 1964, the suspension of the cars was replaced by another Moulton
design, the hydrolastic system. The new suspension gave a softer ride,
but it also increased weight and production cost. In 1971, the
original rubber suspension reappeared and was retained for the
remaining life of the Mini."

--
Chris Green
·
  #29  
Old March 22nd 18, 02:05 PM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
Chris J Dixon
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Bill Wright wrote:
Camp 'Coffee' made from bloody acorns or something,


I was amused by the beverage routine at the glass factory where I
spent a few weeks between leaving school and starting college,
now over 50 years ago.

From time to time during the shift somebody was sent to the
canteen with a large cardboard box, and a list of requirements
along the lines of "2 pints and 2 halves of tea, 3 pints and 2
halves of coffee".

In the canteen, which was a greasy a dive as ever I have come
across, the order was fulfilled in the following manner:

Glass bottles, this being a factory producing them, were taken
from a stack, usually squash, or pop designs, depending on what
was being made that day.

Into the first bottle went a green plastic funnel. The brew
machine tap was opened and tea run into an aged 1 pint enamel
mug. Milk and sugar were added as required, and stirred briskly
with a dessert spoon worn triangular by years of use. This was
then tipped into the funnel. Whilst the first bottle filled, the
next brew was prepared.

When it came to coffee, the hot water tap on the brew machine was
used, and the (same) spoon used to measure out a quantity of Camp
Essence (http://www.sybertooth.com/camp/) into the same mug and
thence into the funnel.

The order, when complete, was then taken back to the office in
the cardboard box.

The custom was to swig direct from the bottle, though the
fastidious could use a jam jar, as these were coming off the line
at 2 per second.

It was fine once one was used to it but, on the first few
occasions, lifting a familiar pop bottle to swig a hot brown
liquid felt really strange.

Chris
--
Chris J Dixon Nottingham UK


Plant amazing Acers.
  #30  
Old March 22nd 18, 02:18 PM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
Norman Wells[_6_]
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On 22/03/2018 14:08, Graham. wrote:
My neighbour had a clothes peg on the mini choke cable to keep it out a bit
at all times.

Does anyone remember those three wheelers with the door on the front?
I had a ride in one of those, you felt like you were being a crash test
dummy in traffic.
Brian


You could shoot at Triumph Spitfires from one of those.


Mine was my first BMW. Good fun too.

You could open the lock with a lolly stick, but that sort of thing
didn't seem to matter then.
 




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