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uk.tech.digital-tv (Digital TV - General) (uk.tech.digital-tv) Discussion of all matters technical in origin related to the reception of digital television transmissions, be they via satellite, terrestrial or cable. Advertising is forbidden, with no exceptions.

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  #11  
Old March 22nd 18, 10:20 AM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
Brian Gaff
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My neighbour had a clothes peg on the mini choke cable to keep it out a bit
at all times.

Does anyone remember those three wheelers with the door on the front?
I had a ride in one of those, you felt like you were being a crash test
dummy in traffic.
Brian

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"Jeff Gaines" wrote in message
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On 22/03/2018 in message
NY wrote:

Cars with chokes: if you push the choke in a bit too soon, the engine
loses power or stalls altogether


Used by many lady drivers as a useful hook to hang their bags on :-)

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  #12  
Old March 22nd 18, 10:43 AM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
charles[_2_]
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In article ,
Jeff Gaines wrote:
On 22/03/2018 in message
NY wrote:


Cars with chokes: if you push the choke in a bit too soon, the engine
loses power or stalls altogether


Used by many lady drivers as a useful hook to hang their bags on :-)


In the same way that the CD drive tray on PC's could be used as a cup
holder. There was even a program for the Archimedes called (ISTR) "coffee"
to put the tray out.

--
from KT24 in Surrey, England
  #13  
Old March 22nd 18, 10:50 AM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
Chris Green
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Brian Gaff wrote:
They were the later ones that used rubber I think you will find the early
ones all had the fluid system similar to those raising and lowering French
jobbies with dodgy wiring looms.


No, the original minis were rubber suspension, it was the 1100 that
introduced hydrolastic and that was then put into the later minis.

I had a 1962 mini and that was definitely rubber cones, the mini was
ony introduced in 1959 if I remember right.

.... and the 1100 hydorlastic was not much like the Citroen suspension,
it didn't pump up and down and I dont *think* it had spheres like the
Citroens did (and still do, though only C5 Exclusive now I think).

Later Citroens are much more reliable, we had several XMs, which were
OK but not brilliant electrically, we then had a 2005 C5 which was
excellent, we only just got rid of it, still reliable at 175000 miles.
We now have a C5 and a C6. (Citroen enthusiasts? No, of course not!)

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Chris Green
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  #14  
Old March 22nd 18, 11:19 AM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
Jim Lesurf[_2_]
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In article , charles
wrote:

In the same way that the CD drive tray on PC's could be used as a cup
holder. There was even a program for the Archimedes called (ISTR)
"coffee" to put the tray out.


Pah! Someone fitted a 'Pizza [email protected] slice to a RiscPC. 8-]

Jim

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  #15  
Old March 22nd 18, 11:23 AM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
Peter Johnson[_5_]
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On Thu, 22 Mar 2018 09:42:54 -0000, "NY" wrote:



Warm, semi-sour milk in 1/3 pint bottles at school - my infant school (last
60s) served it in the *afternoon* playtime, after it had had all day at room
temperature to go off. I remember a mate of mine who said to the teacher
"why don't do just pour it down the loo" - since that's where it will go
anyway since most people puked straight afterwards.


Andin winter left outside to freeze. School milk put me off drinking
it for many years.
Also parking leights that had to be left on on cars parked in the
street overnight, running down the battery.
  #16  
Old March 22nd 18, 12:05 PM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
Jeff Layman[_2_]
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On 22/03/18 09:42, NY wrote:

Televisions and radios that took ages to "warm up". (Mind you, today's smart
TVs take as long as a valve TV used to do, because they have to boot up.)


My Panny "smart TV" starts pretty quickly - quicker than the previous
non-smart model. But that's only for OTA stuff. If I want to use the
internet to catch up or watch YouTube on it, etc, then I do have to wait
quite a bit longer.

--

Jeff
  #17  
Old March 22nd 18, 12:39 PM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
Andrew[_6_]
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On 22/03/2018 01:33, Bill Wright wrote:
and Camp 'Coffee' made from bloody acorns or something, and tinned
condensed milk,


But Camp coffee was useful for adding to cold milk in hot weather.

Tinned condensed milk is a godsend for Indians who make indian
sweets that have very high levels of sugar. Previously it used to
take days to make them from scratch.

And those parts of the world where people have no fridges use
a lot of tinned condensed milk. After opening you have to
stand the tin in a saucer of water to keep the ants out of it.
  #18  
Old March 22nd 18, 12:41 PM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
Andrew[_6_]
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On 22/03/2018 09:02, Brian Gaff wrote:
Yes well, I was brought up on condensed milk. some say it helped win the
war.

We had icicles on the ceiling in this house never mind the windows. The
eaves were so close to the corner of the room. Now we have all this lagging,
draft proofing and double glazing, no open fires with draftee chimneys, no
pea souper fogs that left the scarf you breathed through yellow as nobody
now has inefficient fires running on poor quality coal.

No spontaneously combusting Cortina mark 1 and 2s or Escorts with holes in
the floor covered by a piece of hardboard.

Brian


You should visit somewhere like Fiji. Most of the taxis are like that.
  #19  
Old March 22nd 18, 12:50 PM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
Andrew[_6_]
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On 22/03/2018 08:55, Brian Gaff wrote:
or the Mini that was so close to the ground that
you often hit the road or their hydrolastic suspension that was always
losing pressure and thumping you down with no springs.


Minis never had hydrolastic suspension. 1100's and 1800's had
that. They did wear out their rear radius arm bearings so that
the car adopted rear-wheel steering when you went round a bend.

Minis and 1100s had the ignition key in the centre where
your knee would hit it in a crash (no seat belts of course).

I worked in a hospital path lab in the 70's and A&E staff
knew what make of car the victim was driving, or a passenger
because the key was frequently embedded in the remains of their
knee joint.

The door locks were so flimsy that the doors flew open after a
rollover crash, which also bashed off the petrol filler cap,
spraying petrol like a catherine wheel.

Andrew
  #20  
Old March 22nd 18, 12:54 PM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
Andrew[_6_]
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On 22/03/2018 09:42, NY wrote:
Warm, semi-sour milk in 1/3 pint bottles at school - my infant school
(last 60s) served it in the *afternoon* playtime, after it had had all
day at room temperature to go off. I remember a mate of mine who said to
the teacher "why don't do just pour it down the loo" - since that's
where it will go anyway since most people puked straight afterwards.


My recollection too. And we also had the problem where access to the
milk was controlled by the pupil 'mafia' who decided who got some
and who got none.

And people still make a fuss about Mrs T removing it.


 




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