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  #91  
Old March 23rd 18, 06:53 PM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
NY
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"Mr. Marmite" wrote in message
...
On Fri, 23 Mar 2018 10:16:11 -0000, "NY" wrote:

[snip]

She also remembered having to administer treacle to each child by dipping
a
spoon in a huge jar, sticking it in the child's mouth for them to lick it
off, and then putting the same spoon back into the jar for the next kid -
the opportunities for diseases to be passed from one child to the next
must
have been horrendous.

Yes, I can remember exactly the same procedure, but I'm sure it was malt
extract that was administered rather than treacle. Equally delicious,
though...



Hmmm. I'm sure she actually said "treacle" but maybe she just said it was
very sticky and my brain and faulty memory has filled in "treacle".

Nowadays if that was done, they'd have a separate one-time-usage spoon for
each child, to avoid cross-infection, and lingering infections between one
day's usage of the spoon and the next.

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  #92  
Old March 23rd 18, 07:48 PM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
Dave W
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On 23/03/2018 11:28, R. Mark Clayton wrote:
On Friday, 23 March 2018 11:16:03 UTC, Chris Green wrote:
Ian Jackson wrote:
In message , Chris Green
writes
Brian Gaff wrote:
Are you sure you folk are not mixing up condensed milk with evaporated
milk?
One is a power the other a liquid.

Surely *both* are liquid and come in tins, condensed milk in tins
being more of a cream and evaporated milk being more liquid.

Indeed. Condensed is quite runny, and is readily drinkable. Evaporated
is thick and rather treacly - and it's very sweet.


I thought it was the other way round


ditto. Google up.

but maybe that's simply different
brands calling them by different names.


Nestle made both.


--
Chris Green
·


Evaporated milk was made by Carnation, who have taken over Nestle. I use
"Squeezy condensed milk" which is Nestles milk in a Nestle/Carnation
dispenser.

If you run out of ordinary milk for tea I recommend a dollop of vanilla
ice cream, or mix it with water on cereal.
--
Dave W
--
Dave W
  #93  
Old March 23rd 18, 07:48 PM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
James Heaton
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"Bill Wright" wrote in message
news
On 22/03/2018 20:45, James Heaton wrote:

Bill - 22A is 250w or so, if no decent heater what was pulling enough out
of that to leave you with an uncharged battery?


Turning the cold damp engine over in the morning, then a four mile journey
to work with lights, wipers, blower, and valved radio on. Then the same on
the way back.

This when I had a proper job...


Gotcha - it just couldn't work fast enough to put back what cold starts took
out unless it was a long run.

Cheers James

  #94  
Old March 23rd 18, 08:24 PM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
Bill Wright[_3_]
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On 23/03/2018 20:48, James Heaton wrote:

Gotcha - it just couldn't work fast enough to put back what cold starts
took out unless it was a long run.

Cheers James


It was a perpetual problem in winter. Many people routinely connected a
trickle charger every night.

Bill
  #95  
Old March 24th 18, 08:56 AM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
NY
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"Bill Wright" wrote in message
news
On 23/03/2018 20:48, James Heaton wrote:

Gotcha - it just couldn't work fast enough to put back what cold starts
took out unless it was a long run.

Cheers James


It was a perpetual problem in winter. Many people routinely connected a
trickle charger every night.


Yes, I've heard of people doing that, well into the 1980s (maybe with older
1960s cars). I've been lucky that all my cars have been sufficiently new
that the charging has put back what the starter has used up and there hasn't
been a nett loss of charge over several days/weeks.

The only time my battery has started to go worryingly flat was a few months
ago when I had an intermittent problem with the engine management system
(possibly glow plugs or else some fuel sensor) which allowed the car to
start fine and run for about 5 mins (each time it failed, it was always on
the same bit of road) and then the engine died. After a few seconds it could
be restarted, then it would go for another couple of hundred yards and die
again. After about 5 of these cycles, the engine would run for the rest of
the day (including a stop of several hours, so the engine had chance to go
cold).

We were in the process of moving house and I was taking lots of boxes of
small possessions to the new house, so I was doing runs of about 60 miles
there and 60 back. On the day that the removal van came, I was due to drive
over to the new house to be there to let the removal men in. I'd just nicely
got onto the busy main road when the engine died and it took a *lot* of
cycles to get it to the point where it would stay on, so that was a lot of
turns of the starter motor. (*) By the end, the starter was getting rather
lethargic and I hoped I'd at least be able to get the car back home (about
1/2 mile away) so I could change to my wife's car to set off to follow the
van. Thankfully after a few minutes rest, the battery was able to give one
last start - and the engine decided to co-operate and not die as soon as I
set off. Even with the half-hour delay that all this caused, I still managed
to overtake the van (pootling along the A1 at about 50) and be there in
plenty of time.

Normally I'd have taken the car to the garage to get it fixed, but I
couldn't spare the time without a car. It wasn't until we were in the new
house that I had time - and the garage gave me a loan car which I couldn't
return for ages because the day after I brought it home, the Beast from the
East arrived and snowed in the village. I could probably have got out but I
might not have got up the hill to get back in, especially with summer tyres.
Even my wife's 4x4 had problems with the packed snow that had turned to ice
on the steepest part of the hill.

(*) I knew that if I was going to turn round to go back home, I'd need to
pull out again into traffic that could be doing 60 mph, so I didn't want the
engine to die as I was pulling out, or as I was setting off from the central
refuge to turn right across the oncoming traffic.

  #96  
Old March 24th 18, 09:25 AM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
Andrew[_6_]
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On 23/03/2018 17:01, R. Mark Clayton wrote:
Whilst the Highway Code's thinking distances are probably still valid [for a dozy driver] the stopping distances are nearly double what one is likely to achieve.


I think you'll find that the relaxed official stopping distances
are to allow ancient landys to remain road legal.
  #97  
Old March 24th 18, 09:26 AM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
Andrew[_6_]
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On 23/03/2018 21:24, Bill Wright wrote:
On 23/03/2018 20:48, James Heaton wrote:

Gotcha - it just couldn't work fast enough to put back what cold
starts took out unless it was a long run.

Cheers James


It was a perpetual problem in winter. Many people routinely connected a
trickle charger every night.

Bill


And put one of those flying saucer paraffin heaters under
the sump.
  #98  
Old March 24th 18, 09:27 AM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
Andrew[_6_]
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On 23/03/2018 18:26, Mr. Marmite wrote:
On Fri, 23 Mar 2018 10:16:11 -0000, "NY" wrote:

[snip]

She also remembered having to administer treacle to each child by dipping a
spoon in a huge jar, sticking it in the child's mouth for them to lick it
off, and then putting the same spoon back into the jar for the next kid -
the opportunities for diseases to be passed from one child to the next must
have been horrendous.

Yes, I can remember exactly the same procedure, but I'm sure it was malt
extract that was administered rather than treacle. Equally delicious,
though...


Still available today in block form from your local
agricultural dealers, though intended for livestock.
  #99  
Old March 24th 18, 09:34 AM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
Andrew[_6_]
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On 23/03/2018 13:31, Max Demian wrote:
On 23/03/2018 10:10, Chris Green wrote:
Brian Gaff wrote:
Are you sure you folk are not¬* mixing up condensed milk with evaporated
milk?
¬* One is a power the other a liquid.


Surely *both* are liquid and come in tins, condensed milk in tins
being more of a cream and evaporated milk being more liquid.


I'm surprised condensed milk (the sticky sweet kind - Nestlé Milk)
survived so long. Some cake and desert recipes specify it I think.
Apparently evaporated milk was widely available from the 1920s; I
remember it (Nestlé Ideal Milk or Carnation Milk) from the 1960s as
rather a novel item. Nice poured (neat) over fruit pies. I suppose you
could reconstitute it by mixing it with twice its volume of water, but
I've never known people to do that.


I have a tin in my cupboard for 'emergency' use.

brand name 'Milbona', Hochwald Foods, GMBH, Thalfang Germany,
but it is made in the Netherlands.

The tin says 'shake well before serving'. That could be
tricky though.



  #100  
Old March 24th 18, 09:44 AM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
Andy Burns[_12_]
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Andrew wrote:

I think you'll find that the relaxed official stopping distances
are to allow ancient landys to remain road legal.


Along with their tiny, dingy rear lights ...

 




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