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Weather warnings



 
 
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  #61  
Old March 18th 18, 01:33 PM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
charles[_2_]
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Posts: 699
Default Weather warnings

In article ,
Max Demian wrote:
On 18/03/2018 06:43, Geoff Pearson wrote:


I am colour-blind so find electronics a bit of a chore (although a
licensed radio amateur). Mains cables have three wires, blue, striped
and the other one (which is live). Traffic lights have the top one
(sometimes recognisable as red), the middle one (probably orange or the
same as the top one) and white (at the bottom). City night driving can
be tricky. Ethernet cables have brown, green and orange pairs, so I am
told - impossible.


There was a boy at my school who was colour blind; when we did prisms
and the spectrum he complained that he could only see three colours,
instead of six (or the Newtonian seven). I think he was told to shut up
rather than it being a matter for discussion.


Supposedly the colour blindness gene is retained in the population as
some predator camouflage doesn't work so well for people with the common
kind of colour blindness (usually called red/green), just as there is a
colour vision card that only colour blind people can decipher. The extra
colours confuse the brain.


I understand that 1 on 10 men have colour blindness of a sort - but only 1
woman in 100. This is unfair and the proper authorities need to investigate
and equalise matters.

--
from KT24 in Surrey, England
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  #62  
Old March 18th 18, 02:30 PM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
NY
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Posts: 1,329
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"Martin" wrote in message
...
I understand that 1 on 10 men have colour blindness of a sort - but only 1
woman in 100. This is unfair and the proper authorities need to
investigate
and equalise matters.


Only men have testicles. Maybe men could trade a testicle in exchange for
an eye
that is not colour blind. Thought not.


That's a very cock eyed suggestion :-)

  #63  
Old March 18th 18, 02:39 PM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
R. Mark Clayton[_2_]
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Posts: 649
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On Sunday, 18 March 2018 13:33:47 UTC, Max Demian wrote:
On 18/03/2018 12:31, NY wrote:
"Woody" wrote in message
news

(*) I remember it using the mnemonic Bye Bye Rosie On You Go,
Birmingham Via Great Western, but I'm buggered if I can remember what
the letters stand for - there are three Bs and two Gs. There's a
brown, a black and a blue, and there's a green and a grey. I *think*
it's black, brown, red, orange, yellow, green, blue, violet, grey,
white - but I could well have got the green and the grey swapped round.

Black=0
Brown=1
Red=2
Orange=3
Yellow=4
Blue=5
Green=6
Violet=7
Grey=8
White-9

and I didn't even have to look it up!


I think you might have got your blue and green the wrong way round (it
doesn't fit the mnemonic), but otherwise it looks as if we've both
remembered it the same - and that matches what a Google search gives.


I remember the colours of the rainbow intuitively on the basis that,
e.g. orange looks like it has a bit of red and a bit of yellow in it, so
I can remember the colour codes for 2-7 OK and just have to add the
others. In any case when I did electronics I just /knew/ them. Nowadays
it's more difficult as resistor are so tiny that the colour bands look
rather similar. Or maybe the colours they use aren't so distinct. And if
they don't have a silver or gold one end I don't know which end to read
it from.

--
Max Demian


Silver meant 10% and gold 5% precision, occasionally another brown / red meaning 1 / 2%.

As it happened without a precision band there were only certain well established values (E12 series from 1952): -

1– 1.2 – 1.5 – 1.8 – 2.2 – 2.7 – 3.3 – 3.9 – 4.7 – 5.6 – 6.8 – 8.2

so there were only a few values that could be confused (e.g. 4,700 and 270,000 ohms), OTOH an 18k ohm could not be misread as 380 ohm as 380 was not in the series.
  #64  
Old March 18th 18, 02:43 PM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
R. Mark Clayton[_2_]
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Posts: 649
Default Weather warnings

On Sunday, 18 March 2018 12:57:37 UTC, Norman Wells wrote:
On 18/03/2018 12:28, Java Jive wrote:
On 18/03/2018 11:56, Peter Duncanson wrote:

The Oxford English Dictionary says that "red for danger" started with
the use of red in "red flag": "A sign of danger, a warning; a signal to
stop".

The choice of red might have been because it is a colour that sticks out
against a natural background of grass, trees, bushes, other plants, etc,
which are typically a mixture of green and brown with other colours in
small amounts, in small areas, in flower petals, etc.


Animals that are poisonous to eat or otherwise dangerous often advertise
the fact by adopting garish colours* -* yellow frogs, red frogs, yellow
wasps, etc.


So they say, and it gets mindlessly recycled, but how come I (and lots
of other creatures) happily eat strawberries, rasperries, tomatoes,
watermelons etc etc, and am clearly attracted to eat garish colours?

There's a bit of nonsense going on here.


Brightly coloured animals are often poisonous or pack a sting, although some, like the stone fish I nearly trod on in a rock pool, are not. This is to deter consumption.

Brightly colour fruits OTOH are usually trying to attract consumption and this indicates ripeness.
  #65  
Old March 18th 18, 02:45 PM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
NY
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Posts: 1,329
Default Weather warnings

"Martin" wrote in message
...
Is it easy to replace a central heating controller with a Hive
remote-controlled
device?


Yes, very. A Hive has three parts: a switch unit which replaces the timer
controller; a thermostat; a hub that talks to the switch and thermostat and
also to the internet.

Heating controllers usually have a backing plate screwed to the wall into
which the wires are connected. The controller then hooks over this plate and
is screwed into place. Modern controllers use a plate which is
pin-compatible with the Hive switch unit, so it's a five minute job. In my
case, the old controller used a larger plate so I had to unwire it, unscrew
it, screw the Hive plate in its place and rewire it. That took a few more
minutes.

The only other thing is to remove the normal thermostat which is wired in
series with the controller's CH channel. I took the lazy way out and turned
it up to 40 deg C so it was permanently on, leaving control of the CH
entirely in the hands of the Hive, both for time of day and temperature
control.

The rest of the setting up of the Hive was standard computer configuration
stuff: plug the "hub" into a spare Ethernet port on the router and check
that it can talk wirelessly (*) to the controller switches. And set up an
account on Hive's server and install the app on our mobile phones. That
allowed us to monitor the house temperature when we were away from home, and
define and modify schedules for heating and water - eg between 06:00 and
08:00 set temp to 18 deg, between 08:00 and 22:00 set it to 20 deg, between
22:00 and 06:00 set it to 15 deg etc. It meant we could be away on holiday,
leaving the temperature set to 10 deg (to keep the freezers happy), and then
when we were a few hours from home, turn the temp to 20 deg so the house was
warm for when we arrived.

(*) Its own private wireless, completely separate from wifi. The Hive hub
has to use Ethernet and can't communicate by wifi with the router. The hub
also communicates by private wireless with the thermostat unit which is
standard light-switch size.

  #66  
Old March 18th 18, 02:47 PM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
critcher[_6_]
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Posts: 96
Default Weather warnings

On 16/03/2018 21:51, Vir Campestris wrote:
On 16/03/2018 17:00, Chris Green wrote:
I agree, I hadn't even realised until recently that there were two
different levels called yellow and amber.* Traffic light middle light
is called both yellow and amber so one would assume they're the same.

Traditionally railways use yellow, and roads amber, for the name of the
intermediate colour,

Surely red, orange, yellow would be more obvious.


And if you happen to be red-green colour blind, like about 10% of men,
they're near as dammit identical. Which is why red is _always_ at the top.

Andy


absolutely.
  #67  
Old March 18th 18, 02:49 PM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
critcher[_6_]
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Posts: 96
Default Weather warnings

On 18/03/2018 06:43, Geoff Pearson wrote:
"charles"* wrote in message ...

In article , Max Demian
wrote:
On 17/03/2018 11:48, Scott wrote:
On Sat, 17 Mar 2018 11:20:13 +0000, Max Demian
wrote:

On 17/03/2018 10:58, NY wrote:
"John Hall" wrote in message
...
In message , Vir Campestris
writes
And if you happen to be red-green colour blind, like about 10% of
men, they're near as dammit identical. Which is why red is _always_
at the top.

I was thinking that the current weather warning colours can't be
ideal for these people, and wondering why they didn't use blue as
one of the colours instead (and for traffic lights too).

Japan used to use blue as the "go" light, and still uses this word to
describe a light which is now the bluest shade of green (or greenest
shade of blue) that they could achieve.

There's no particular logic to red for stop and green for go.
Apparently they come from the red and green port and starboard lights
on aeroplanes and boats, so could have been the other way round.

Are you sure?* I thought red was traditionally associated with danger.
Did a red flag not need to be carried in front of motor vehicles long
before traffic lights were introduced?


I think the "red for danger" idea is just a mnemonic. If red was go
people would say that red is a fierce colour implying that you should go
ahead, whereas green is a calm colour implying you should stay put.


until EU harmonisation, Germany used Red for the earth wire.

--
from KT24 in Surrey, England


I am colour-blind so find electronics a bit of a chore (although a
licensed radio amateur).* Mains cables have three wires, blue, striped
and the other one (which is live).* Traffic lights have the top one
(sometimes recognisable as red), the middle one (probably orange or the
same as the top one) and white (at the bottom).* City night driving can
be tricky.* Ethernet cables have brown, green and orange pairs, so I am
told - impossible.

The Yellow and Amber weather zones are a complete mystery.




Same here, but it's difficult to describe "colour blindness" to someone
who doesn't suffer from it.
  #68  
Old March 18th 18, 02:50 PM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
Norman Wells[_6_]
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Posts: 984
Default Weather warnings

On 18/03/2018 14:25, Java Jive wrote:
On 18/03/2018 12:57, Norman Wells wrote:

On 18/03/2018 12:28, Java Jive wrote:

Animals that are poisonous to eat or otherwise dangerous often
advertise the fact by adopting garish colours* -* yellow frogs, red
frogs, yellow wasps, etc.


So they say, and it gets mindlessly recycled, but how come I (and lots
of other creatures) happily eat strawberries, rasperries, tomatoes,
watermelons etc etc, and am clearly attracted to eat garish colours?


Because you as an omnivore know that plants are different from animals
-* you may be quite happy to eat a red strawberry, but if you also eat
frogs a la francais, would you be so keen to eat a red one? My guess is not!


And you'd be right. I wouldn't even eat the ones the French eat, which
are actually a garish green, not too dissimilar to the horribly toxic
Amazonian ones.

Both have evolved under different evolutionary pressures, and
while we may have only come to understand such things within the last
200 years or so, probably from the earliest times we've associated red
fruits with good eating, but small red animals with bad eating.


That doesn't hold water either, though.

If garish colours mean 'don't eat' then, because we are omnivores, dull
colours must mean 'eat me' surely. Yet we don't eat rats or moles or
hedgehogs, do we?

Most animals are on someone else's menu, and naturally don't want to get
eaten, so they have evolved cryptic colours that makes them blend in
with their surroundings.* However, obviously fair numbers must still get
eaten, because otherwise the predators would have starved into
extinction by now.* However if you're very, very poisonous indeed, like
some Amazonian frogs whose mucus is used by Native Amerindians to poison
their blow dart tips, then even one oral contact by a predator is
probably going to end badly for the predator, but it may also end badly
for the frog, so it pays them to stand out from the crowd,


Well, I'm not sure about that. You see, for the good of the species as
a whole it would be a good move for some really poisonous frogs to look
good to eat so that in time all the predators are eliminated before all
the other frogs can be eaten.

and adopt
garish colours to show that they are very different from normal prey.
Predators that survive learn very quickly to associate such garish
colours with a bad experience, and steer clear.


I think you're insulting the intelligence of predators there. If they
can do what you say with bright colours, why couldn't they work out that
dull brown things lead to a bad experience, if they do?

Thus it also happens
that some animals that aren't poisonous have evolved colours to mimic
those of similar ones that are, and so avoid predation.* However, it's a
numbers game, if there were too many such fakes, particularly if they
outnumber the genuinely poisonous animals they mimic, then predators
would learn to associate garish colours with food, and evolution would
have to slide down the snake and start again at Square 1!

With plants, the signals being given out have evolved differently and
have a different purpose.* The 'normal' state of the fruit is green, it
only turns red when it is ripe and ready to eat.* The plants don't
'want'* -* by that I mean that they have evolved in such a way as their
actions can appear superficially to be intentional* -* the local
fruit-eaters to eat their fruit before the seeds within it have fully
developed, so they make no effort to change its colour from its usual
green, but when the fruit is ripe, they actually 'want' the fruit to be
eaten, so that the seeds will be carried away from the parent tree and
deposited some distance away in a pile of nutritious dung, so they
signal this by changing its colour.* Effectively, they are saying to the
fruit-eaters:* "Dinner is served!"

There's a bit of nonsense going on here.


Not at all, it's just Darwinian evolution at work.


No, I think there's an element of humans inventing a narrative and
perpetuating it despite loads of inconvenient evidence to the contrary
which they find more convenient to ignore
..

  #69  
Old March 18th 18, 02:58 PM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
R. Mark Clayton[_2_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 649
Default Weather warnings

On Sunday, 18 March 2018 15:39:51 UTC, R. Mark Clayton wrote:
On Sunday, 18 March 2018 13:33:47 UTC, Max Demian wrote:
On 18/03/2018 12:31, NY wrote:
"Woody" wrote in message
news
(*) I remember it using the mnemonic Bye Bye Rosie On You Go,
Birmingham Via Great Western, but I'm buggered if I can remember what
the letters stand for - there are three Bs and two Gs. There's a
brown, a black and a blue, and there's a green and a grey. I *think*
it's black, brown, red, orange, yellow, green, blue, violet, grey,
white - but I could well have got the green and the grey swapped round.

Black=0
Brown=1
Red=2
Orange=3
Yellow=4
Blue=5
Green=6
Violet=7
Grey=8
White-9

and I didn't even have to look it up!

I think you might have got your blue and green the wrong way round (it
doesn't fit the mnemonic), but otherwise it looks as if we've both
remembered it the same - and that matches what a Google search gives.


I remember the colours of the rainbow intuitively on the basis that,
e.g. orange looks like it has a bit of red and a bit of yellow in it, so
I can remember the colour codes for 2-7 OK and just have to add the
others. In any case when I did electronics I just /knew/ them. Nowadays
it's more difficult as resistor are so tiny that the colour bands look
rather similar. Or maybe the colours they use aren't so distinct. And if
they don't have a silver or gold one end I don't know which end to read
it from.

--
Max Demian


Silver meant 10% and gold 5% precision, occasionally another brown / red meaning 1 / 2%.

As it happened without a precision band there were only certain well established values (E12 series from 1952): -

1– 1.2 – 1.5 – 1.8 – 2.2 – 2.7 – 3.3 – 3.9 – 4.7 – 5.6 – 6.8 – 8.2

so there were only a few values that could be confused (e.g. 4,700 and 270,000 ohms), OTOH an 18k ohm could not be misread as 380 ohm as 380 was not in the series.


Oops - slightly mis-remembered that - it was the E6 series (tolerance 20%), which were only 10 15 22 33 47 68, so all possibilities were mutually exclusive.
  #70  
Old March 18th 18, 03:03 PM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
Norman Wells[_6_]
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Posts: 984
Default Weather warnings

On 18/03/2018 15:43, R. Mark Clayton wrote:
On Sunday, 18 March 2018 12:57:37 UTC, Norman Wells wrote:
On 18/03/2018 12:28, Java Jive wrote:
On 18/03/2018 11:56, Peter Duncanson wrote:

The Oxford English Dictionary says that "red for danger" started with
the use of red in "red flag": "A sign of danger, a warning; a signal to
stop".

The choice of red might have been because it is a colour that sticks out
against a natural background of grass, trees, bushes, other plants, etc,
which are typically a mixture of green and brown with other colours in
small amounts, in small areas, in flower petals, etc.

Animals that are poisonous to eat or otherwise dangerous often advertise
the fact by adopting garish colours* -* yellow frogs, red frogs, yellow
wasps, etc.


So they say, and it gets mindlessly recycled, but how come I (and lots
of other creatures) happily eat strawberries, rasperries, tomatoes,
watermelons etc etc, and am clearly attracted to eat garish colours?

There's a bit of nonsense going on here.


Brightly coloured animals are often poisonous or pack a sting, although some, like the stone fish I nearly trod on in a rock pool, are not. This is to deter consumption.

Brightly colour fruits OTOH are usually trying to attract consumption and this indicates ripeness.


So, bright colours attract consumption except when they don't, and dull
brown things are OK, except when you step on them.

I think I've got that now.


 




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