A Sky, cable and digital tv forum. Digital TV Banter

If this is your first visit, be sure to check out the FAQ by clicking the link above. You may have to register before you can post: click the register link above to proceed. To start viewing messages, select the forum that you want to visit from the selection below.

Go Back   Home » Digital TV Banter forum » Digital TV Newsgroups » uk.tech.digital-tv (Digital TV - General)
Site Map Home Register Authors List Search Today's Posts Mark Forums Read Web Partners

uk.tech.digital-tv (Digital TV - General) (uk.tech.digital-tv) Discussion of all matters technical in origin related to the reception of digital television transmissions, be they via satellite, terrestrial or cable. Advertising is forbidden, with no exceptions.

Weather warnings



 
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
  #41  
Old March 17th 18, 06:30 PM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
Max Demian
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 3,970
Default Weather warnings

On 17/03/2018 11:48, Scott wrote:
On Sat, 17 Mar 2018 11:20:13 +0000, Max Demian
wrote:

On 17/03/2018 10:58, NY wrote:
"John Hall" wrote in message
...
In message , Vir Campestris
writes
And if you happen to be red-green colour blind, like about 10% of
men, they're near as dammit identical. Which is why red is _always_
at the top.

I was thinking that the current weather warning colours can't be ideal
for these people, and wondering why they didn't use blue as one of the
colours instead (and for traffic lights too).

Japan used to use blue as the "go" light, and still uses this word to
describe a light which is now the bluest shade of green (or greenest
shade of blue) that they could achieve.


There's no particular logic to red for stop and green for go. Apparently
they come from the red and green port and starboard lights on aeroplanes
and boats, so could have been the other way round.


Are you sure? I thought red was traditionally associated with danger.
Did a red flag not need to be carried in front of motor vehicles long
before traffic lights were introduced?


I think the "red for danger" idea is just a mnemonic. If red was go
people would say that red is a fierce colour implying that you should go
ahead, whereas green is a calm colour implying you should stay put.

--
Max Demian
Ads
  #42  
Old March 17th 18, 07:08 PM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
James Heaton
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 117
Default Weather warnings


"NY" wrote in message
news
"Max Demian" wrote in message
o.uk...
On 17/03/2018 10:58, NY wrote:
"John Hall" wrote in message
...
In message , Vir Campestris
writes
And if you happen to be red-green colour blind, like about 10% of men,
they're near as dammit identical. Which is why red is _always_ at the
top.

I was thinking that the current weather warning colours can't be ideal
for these people, and wondering why they didn't use blue as one of the
colours instead (and for traffic lights too).

Japan used to use blue as the "go" light, and still uses this word to
describe a light which is now the bluest shade of green (or greenest
shade of blue) that they could achieve.


There's no particular logic to red for stop and green for go. Apparently
they come from the red and green port and starboard lights on aeroplanes
and boats, so could have been the other way round.


Likewise the convention that red is hot and blue is cold for bath taps. At
one time someone made an arbitrary decision that has become a universal
convention.

I think that railway stop signals used to be white - possibly when white
light meant danger and no white light meant OK - which had a fundamental
flaw that a failed light or one that was missed by the driver was
interpreted as OK...


Famously from the early days of the GWR:

A ball is displayed on a post outside Reading station to show that it is
safe to enter.

If the ball is not visible, you must not pass it.....

The later you had the lovely design of 3 position semaphore. Horizontal =
stop, 45deg = proceed with caution. For proceed, the arm disappeared into a
slot in the post.

If you want to know how this ended,
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Abbots...cident#Signals

James

  #43  
Old March 17th 18, 07:20 PM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
charles[_2_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 699
Default Weather warnings

In article , Max Demian
wrote:
On 17/03/2018 11:48, Scott wrote:
On Sat, 17 Mar 2018 11:20:13 +0000, Max Demian
wrote:

On 17/03/2018 10:58, NY wrote:
"John Hall" wrote in message
...
In message , Vir Campestris
writes
And if you happen to be red-green colour blind, like about 10% of
men, they're near as dammit identical. Which is why red is _always_
at the top.

I was thinking that the current weather warning colours can't be
ideal for these people, and wondering why they didn't use blue as
one of the colours instead (and for traffic lights too).

Japan used to use blue as the "go" light, and still uses this word to
describe a light which is now the bluest shade of green (or greenest
shade of blue) that they could achieve.

There's no particular logic to red for stop and green for go.
Apparently they come from the red and green port and starboard lights
on aeroplanes and boats, so could have been the other way round.


Are you sure? I thought red was traditionally associated with danger.
Did a red flag not need to be carried in front of motor vehicles long
before traffic lights were introduced?


I think the "red for danger" idea is just a mnemonic. If red was go
people would say that red is a fierce colour implying that you should go
ahead, whereas green is a calm colour implying you should stay put.


until EU harmonisation, Germany used Red for the earth wire.

--
from KT24 in Surrey, England
  #44  
Old March 17th 18, 07:29 PM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
[email protected]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 234
Default Weather warnings

On Saturday, 17 March 2018 10:47:53 UTC, John Hall wrote:
I was thinking that the current weather warning colours can't be ideal
for these people, and wondering why they didn't use blue as one of the
colours instead


On weather maps blue blobs would be confused with the sea.

Owain

  #45  
Old March 17th 18, 07:54 PM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
John Hall[_2_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 265
Default Weather warnings

In message , Scott
writes
I agree, but words can be confusing sometimes. I saw in cooking
instructions, after removing from the oven: 'If desired, flash under
grill'.


An advert for detergent that has been on TV in recent months includes
the sage advice "Keep away from children".
--
John Hall
"Hegel was right when he said that we learn from history
that man can never learn anything from history."
George Bernard Shaw (1856-1950)
  #46  
Old March 17th 18, 07:55 PM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
John Hall[_2_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 265
Default Weather warnings

In message , Scott
writes
On Fri, 16 Mar 2018 17:56:28 -0000, "Woody"
wrote:

I noticed on the Look North Leeds weather today that Owain
whats-his-name said that if you wanted more info look at the Met
Office web site the address of which he showed on screen.

Doesn't say much about the forecasters opinion of Meteo Group does it?


Interestingly, they refer to Met Office weather warnings not Meteo
Group weather warnings.


I believe a requirement has been placed on the BBC to continue to give
the Met Office warnings.
--
John Hall
"Hegel was right when he said that we learn from history
that man can never learn anything from history."
George Bernard Shaw (1856-1950)
  #47  
Old March 18th 18, 05:43 AM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
Geoff Pearson
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 570
Default Weather warnings

"charles" wrote in message ...

In article , Max Demian
wrote:
On 17/03/2018 11:48, Scott wrote:
On Sat, 17 Mar 2018 11:20:13 +0000, Max Demian
wrote:

On 17/03/2018 10:58, NY wrote:
"John Hall" wrote in message
...
In message , Vir Campestris
writes
And if you happen to be red-green colour blind, like about 10% of
men, they're near as dammit identical. Which is why red is _always_
at the top.

I was thinking that the current weather warning colours can't be
ideal for these people, and wondering why they didn't use blue as
one of the colours instead (and for traffic lights too).

Japan used to use blue as the "go" light, and still uses this word to
describe a light which is now the bluest shade of green (or greenest
shade of blue) that they could achieve.

There's no particular logic to red for stop and green for go.
Apparently they come from the red and green port and starboard lights
on aeroplanes and boats, so could have been the other way round.


Are you sure? I thought red was traditionally associated with danger.
Did a red flag not need to be carried in front of motor vehicles long
before traffic lights were introduced?


I think the "red for danger" idea is just a mnemonic. If red was go
people would say that red is a fierce colour implying that you should go
ahead, whereas green is a calm colour implying you should stay put.


until EU harmonisation, Germany used Red for the earth wire.

--
from KT24 in Surrey, England


I am colour-blind so find electronics a bit of a chore (although a licensed
radio amateur). Mains cables have three wires, blue, striped and the other
one (which is live). Traffic lights have the top one (sometimes
recognisable as red), the middle one (probably orange or the same as the top
one) and white (at the bottom). City night driving can be tricky. Ethernet
cables have brown, green and orange pairs, so I am told - impossible.

The Yellow and Amber weather zones are a complete mystery.




  #48  
Old March 18th 18, 08:12 AM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
Marland
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 4
Default Weather warnings

Norman Wells wrote:
On 16/03/2018 16:39, Scott wrote:

Why do they use yellow and amber, which seem to me to be very similar?
Should they not choose colours that are totally dissimilar, as with
electrical cables? Anyone with a visual impairment could be confused.


I think the idea of a yellow and green stripy warning is very sound.

What it would indicate, though, is anyone's guess.

Ground Frost

GH

  #49  
Old March 18th 18, 09:23 AM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
Chris Green
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 178
Default Weather warnings

Geoff Pearson wrote:

The Yellow and Amber weather zones are a complete mystery.

So they are even if you're *not* colour blind? :-)

Give a warning with a yellow[ish] background I doubt if anyone can
decide reliably whether it's yellow or amber. You'd need one of each
to be able to tell.

--
Chris Green
·
  #50  
Old March 18th 18, 10:46 AM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
NY
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 1,329
Default Weather warnings

"Chris Green" wrote in message
...
Geoff Pearson wrote:

The Yellow and Amber weather zones are a complete mystery.

So they are even if you're *not* colour blind? :-)

Give a warning with a yellow[ish] background I doubt if anyone can
decide reliably whether it's yellow or amber. You'd need one of each
to be able to tell.



This is part of the problem with the BBROYGBVGW (*) colour codes for
electronic components: there are too many of them, some are very similar and
they are not consistent (grey on one component looks like violet on
another). And that's with good colour vision (as far as I know, from doing
the coloured-spot pictures where you see large digits embedded in the
pattern of dots).

When I left school, I worked for a year in a chemistry lab as a lab
technician before going to university. My boss was telling me about my
predecessor. The lab did a lot of work with colour chemistry, looking for
colour changes to detect presence of certain reagents. My predecessor got
bizarre results that didn't match the instructions. Other people in the lab
tried again and again, and couldn't get the colour changes that he was
reporting. Eventually, as a throwaway comment, he innocently said "I'm
colour-blind. D'you think that' got anything to do with it." Yes, I think it
was highly likely that it did!


(*) I remember it using the mnemonic Bye Bye Rosie On You Go, Birmingham Via
Great Western, but I'm buggered if I can remember what the letters stand
for - there are three Bs and two Gs. There's a brown, a black and a blue,
and there's a green and a grey. I *think* it's black, brown, red, orange,
yellow, green, blue, violet, grey, white - but I could well have got the
green and the grey swapped round.

 




Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

vB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Forum Jump


All times are GMT. The time now is 06:50 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.6.4
Copyright ©2000 - 2018, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.SEO by vBSEO 2.4.0
Copyright 2004-2018 Digital TV Banter.
The comments are property of their posters.