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The inteligence of pizza delivery drivers.



 
 
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  #31  
Old March 10th 18, 11:22 AM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
[email protected]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 10
Default The inteligence of pizza delivery drivers.

On Sat, 10 Mar 2018 11:54:52 -0000, "tim..."
wrote:



"Roderick Stewart" wrote in message
.. .
On Sat, 10 Mar 2018 09:47:21 +0000, Jeff Layman
wrote:

What can be very annoying about that is when they unimaginatively use
the same name for the Mews as the road it is off of. That way you can be
sure the residents of 1, 2, and 3 XYZ Mews and XYZ Road will
intermittently get each others' mail, when the postie is in too much of
a hurry to read the street address.


It's comforting to know I'm not the only one who has this problem. One
of my former neighbours managed to get the postcodes changed, so that
the Road and the Mews have different postcodes,


doesn't help

I have many occurrences (at more than one address) of getting the wrong mail
because the postie has only read half the address. That the other address
had a completely different post code was ignored by postie

Several times a year we get deliveries to my house number and road
address.But for another similarly named road about 8 miles away in the
same post code area, but different post code. Once I came home and
found a nice new mercedes parked on the drive and keys put through
letter box.

The problem is that the delivery men don't set the sat nav properly.
My road is the first on the list, and that gets selected. Other
property on the road suffer the same problem. It is not the technology
that is the problem.

Posties here are great. We always seem to get a reular who sticks for
several years. He knows who's related to who and who's friens with
who. For example if he can't drop of a packet at my son's house,(a
mile or so distant) he brings it me.

--
brightside S9

Every intelligent boy of sixteen is a Socialist.
At that age one does not see the hook sticking
out of the rather stodgy bait. -- George Orwell.
Ads
  #32  
Old March 10th 18, 12:37 PM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
Peter Duncanson
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 4,272
Default The inteligence of pizza delivery drivers.

On Sat, 10 Mar 2018 10:56:17 +0000, Jeff Layman
wrote:

On 10/03/18 10:27, Roderick Stewart wrote:
On Sat, 10 Mar 2018 09:47:21 +0000, Jeff Layman
wrote:

What can be very annoying about that is when they unimaginatively use
the same name for the Mews as the road it is off of. That way you can be
sure the residents of 1, 2, and 3 XYZ Mews and XYZ Road will
intermittently get each others' mail, when the postie is in too much of
a hurry to read the street address.


It's comforting to know I'm not the only one who has this problem. One
of my former neighbours managed to get the postcodes changed, so that
the Road and the Mews have different postcodes, but that was nearly 20
years ago and people still sometimes get it wrong.


The problem isn't just wrong postcodes issued by the PO, it's that some
satnav databases have incorrect entries. Some couriers always get the
correct address, while others always get it wrong. Why they don't
correct them when told its wrong is beyond me.

Not only that but I occasionally get mail for a different Mews in a
different Road and with a different postcode, the only related
information being the house number. The other Mews in the other road
doesn't even have the same name as the road but is simply called "The
Mews" and in fact consists of the only dwelling places in that road so
you'd think they'd be safe from having their mail delivered elsewhere,
but apparently not.


That's sheer laziness from whoever sorts/delivers the mail.

Sometimes I think about this when watching those documentaries where
the cops break doors down and point guns at the occupants, or worse
still, dramas where hitmen shoot people on their doorsteps. The more
ways you can be wrongly identified, the more ways you can be wrongly
identified by the wrong people.

I've never yet seen a documentary about what happens in the aftermath
of the police breaking the wrong door down. Funny, that. Maybe the
documentary makers don't think it would be as exciting as a bit of
good old destruction with shouting, or maybe the cops have been asked
but are reluctant to cooperate in such a thing. I wonder.


I've wondered about that too. Quite a lot of hits using "wrong"
"address" "police" "raid" in a Google search.

This one was interesting::
https://www.donoghue-solicitors.co.uk/actions-against-the-police/case-reports/police-raid-compensation-claim/

Everyone makes mistakes; why can't they just admit it, compensate
sensibly, and move on?


Because as a publicly funded public body the police have no power to
hand over money in compensation unless it is required or authorised by
law.

The background to this is the constitutional principle in the UK that a
citizen can do anything as long as it is not banned by law, whereas the
government and other public bodies can do only those things explicitly
permitted by law.

So, in this case unless there is a law authorising the police to decide,
by themselves, to pay compensation, at a rate stated in law, they can
only pay compensation when a court has decided whether compensation is
due, and how much.

--
Peter Duncanson
(in uk.tech.digital-tv)
  #33  
Old March 10th 18, 01:33 PM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
Max Demian
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 3,970
Default The inteligence of pizza delivery drivers.

On 10/03/2018 12:22, lid wrote:
On Sat, 10 Mar 2018 11:54:52 -0000, "tim..."
wrote:


"Roderick Stewart" wrote in message
...
On Sat, 10 Mar 2018 09:47:21 +0000, Jeff Layman
wrote:

What can be very annoying about that is when they unimaginatively use
the same name for the Mews as the road it is off of. That way you can be
sure the residents of 1, 2, and 3 XYZ Mews and XYZ Road will
intermittently get each others' mail, when the postie is in too much of
a hurry to read the street address.

It's comforting to know I'm not the only one who has this problem. One
of my former neighbours managed to get the postcodes changed, so that
the Road and the Mews have different postcodes,


doesn't help

I have many occurrences (at more than one address) of getting the wrong mail
because the postie has only read half the address. That the other address
had a completely different post code was ignored by postie

Several times a year we get deliveries to my house number and road
address.But for another similarly named road about 8 miles away in the
same post code area, but different post code. Once I came home and
found a nice new mercedes parked on the drive and keys put through
letter box.


What did you do with the Merc?

--
Max Demian
  #34  
Old March 10th 18, 01:38 PM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
Max Demian
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 3,970
Default The inteligence of pizza delivery drivers.

On 10/03/2018 08:55, Brian Gaff wrote:
And why does my spellchecker keep changing minutes?
Brian


Noun: Minuit
Dutch colonist who bought Manhattan from the NativeĀ*Americans for the
equivalent of $24 (1580-1638)

No idea.

--
Max Demian
  #36  
Old March 10th 18, 02:02 PM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
[email protected]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 10
Default The inteligence of pizza delivery drivers.

On Sat, 10 Mar 2018 13:37:13 +0000, Peter Duncanson
wrote:

On Sat, 10 Mar 2018 10:56:17 +0000, Jeff Layman
wrote:

On 10/03/18 10:27, Roderick Stewart wrote:
On Sat, 10 Mar 2018 09:47:21 +0000, Jeff Layman
wrote:

What can be very annoying about that is when they unimaginatively use
the same name for the Mews as the road it is off of. That way you can be
sure the residents of 1, 2, and 3 XYZ Mews and XYZ Road will
intermittently get each others' mail, when the postie is in too much of
a hurry to read the street address.

It's comforting to know I'm not the only one who has this problem. One
of my former neighbours managed to get the postcodes changed, so that
the Road and the Mews have different postcodes, but that was nearly 20
years ago and people still sometimes get it wrong.


The problem isn't just wrong postcodes issued by the PO, it's that some
satnav databases have incorrect entries. Some couriers always get the
correct address, while others always get it wrong. Why they don't
correct them when told its wrong is beyond me.

Not only that but I occasionally get mail for a different Mews in a
different Road and with a different postcode, the only related
information being the house number. The other Mews in the other road
doesn't even have the same name as the road but is simply called "The
Mews" and in fact consists of the only dwelling places in that road so
you'd think they'd be safe from having their mail delivered elsewhere,
but apparently not.


That's sheer laziness from whoever sorts/delivers the mail.

Sometimes I think about this when watching those documentaries where
the cops break doors down and point guns at the occupants, or worse
still, dramas where hitmen shoot people on their doorsteps. The more
ways you can be wrongly identified, the more ways you can be wrongly
identified by the wrong people.

I've never yet seen a documentary about what happens in the aftermath
of the police breaking the wrong door down. Funny, that. Maybe the
documentary makers don't think it would be as exciting as a bit of
good old destruction with shouting, or maybe the cops have been asked
but are reluctant to cooperate in such a thing. I wonder.


I've wondered about that too. Quite a lot of hits using "wrong"
"address" "police" "raid" in a Google search.

This one was interesting::
https://www.donoghue-solicitors.co.uk/actions-against-the-police/case-reports/police-raid-compensation-claim/

Everyone makes mistakes; why can't they just admit it, compensate
sensibly, and move on?


Because as a publicly funded public body the police have no power to
hand over money in compensation unless it is required or authorised by
law.

The background to this is the constitutional principle in the UK that a
citizen can do anything as long as it is not banned by law, whereas the
government and other public bodies can do only those things explicitly
permitted by law.

So, in this case unless there is a law authorising the police to decide,
by themselves, to pay compensation, at a rate stated in law, they can
only pay compensation when a court has decided whether compensation is
due, and how much.



See this:
http://researchbriefings.files.parli...27/SN06627.pdf

--
brightside S9
  #37  
Old March 10th 18, 02:06 PM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
Jonathan[_2_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 42
Default The inteligence of pizza delivery drivers.

On Friday, 9 March 2018 15:46:56 UTC, wrote:
On Friday, 9 March 2018 14:22:05 UTC, Jonathan wrote:
Not sure I believe that. We used to live in a village of around 40 houses,
all delivered by the same postman. We lived in a group of three cottage a
quarter of a mile up a private drive. Those three cottage had a different
postcode to the rest of the village which had the dame one.


It might be the same postal route *now*, but not when the postcodes were introduced. The postman might have done the main road on foot, but the cottages got someone different on a bicycle.

Owain


I doubt it. That would have required a different postman on a bicycle to come out.

Jonathan
  #39  
Old March 10th 18, 02:24 PM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
Java Jive[_2_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 1,774
Default The inteligence of pizza delivery drivers.

On 10/03/2018 10:27, Roderick Stewart wrote:

Not only that but I occasionally get mail for a different Mews in a
different Road and with a different postcode, the only related
information being the house number. The other Mews in the other road
doesn't even have the same name as the road but is simply called "The
Mews" and in fact consists of the only dwelling places in that road so
you'd think they'd be safe from having their mail delivered elsewhere,
but apparently not.


I've posted this before, but this sort of thing is a perennial talking
point ...

http://www.macfh.co.uk/Macfarlane/Re...fordshire.html
  #40  
Old March 10th 18, 05:05 PM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
Peter Duncanson
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 4,272
Default The inteligence of pizza delivery drivers.

On Sat, 10 Mar 2018 15:02:33 +0000, lid
wrote:

On Sat, 10 Mar 2018 13:37:13 +0000, Peter Duncanson
wrote:

On Sat, 10 Mar 2018 10:56:17 +0000, Jeff Layman
wrote:

On 10/03/18 10:27, Roderick Stewart wrote:
On Sat, 10 Mar 2018 09:47:21 +0000, Jeff Layman
wrote:

What can be very annoying about that is when they unimaginatively use
the same name for the Mews as the road it is off of. That way you can be
sure the residents of 1, 2, and 3 XYZ Mews and XYZ Road will
intermittently get each others' mail, when the postie is in too much of
a hurry to read the street address.

It's comforting to know I'm not the only one who has this problem. One
of my former neighbours managed to get the postcodes changed, so that
the Road and the Mews have different postcodes, but that was nearly 20
years ago and people still sometimes get it wrong.

The problem isn't just wrong postcodes issued by the PO, it's that some
satnav databases have incorrect entries. Some couriers always get the
correct address, while others always get it wrong. Why they don't
correct them when told its wrong is beyond me.

Not only that but I occasionally get mail for a different Mews in a
different Road and with a different postcode, the only related
information being the house number. The other Mews in the other road
doesn't even have the same name as the road but is simply called "The
Mews" and in fact consists of the only dwelling places in that road so
you'd think they'd be safe from having their mail delivered elsewhere,
but apparently not.

That's sheer laziness from whoever sorts/delivers the mail.

Sometimes I think about this when watching those documentaries where
the cops break doors down and point guns at the occupants, or worse
still, dramas where hitmen shoot people on their doorsteps. The more
ways you can be wrongly identified, the more ways you can be wrongly
identified by the wrong people.

I've never yet seen a documentary about what happens in the aftermath
of the police breaking the wrong door down. Funny, that. Maybe the
documentary makers don't think it would be as exciting as a bit of
good old destruction with shouting, or maybe the cops have been asked
but are reluctant to cooperate in such a thing. I wonder.

I've wondered about that too. Quite a lot of hits using "wrong"
"address" "police" "raid" in a Google search.

This one was interesting::
https://www.donoghue-solicitors.co.uk/actions-against-the-police/case-reports/police-raid-compensation-claim/

Everyone makes mistakes; why can't they just admit it, compensate
sensibly, and move on?


Because as a publicly funded public body the police have no power to
hand over money in compensation unless it is required or authorised by
law.

The background to this is the constitutional principle in the UK that a
citizen can do anything as long as it is not banned by law, whereas the
government and other public bodies can do only those things explicitly
permitted by law.

So, in this case unless there is a law authorising the police to decide,
by themselves, to pay compensation, at a rate stated in law, they can
only pay compensation when a court has decided whether compensation is
due, and how much.



See this:
http://researchbriefings.files.parli...27/SN06627.pdf

Thanks for that.
It seems that the police have authority to pay compensation for damage
caused to property when they enter the wrong premises.
This article refers to the payments of compensation by police forces (it
looks as though it might be reasonably accurate even though it is the
Daily Mail!):
http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/arti...roperties.html

Extracts:

Forces across Britain shelled out to repair broken doors, smashed
windows, wrecked walls and even damaged ornaments.

The figures revealed payments for replastering and redecorating,
replacing ornaments, fixing locks and providing glazing services.
The most common costs among 3,607 payouts were for replacing or
repairing doors, listed by 50 per cent of forces.

That article doesn't say whether any of the compensation payments
resulted from actaul or possible court cases.

The link given earlier to Donoghue Solicitors refers to a client (RL)
claiming compensation for psychological damage caused by the mistaken
raid on his home. The matter did not go to court, but it could have
done. It was dealt with by RL acting on the advice of his solicitor and
with his solicitor acting on his behalf. That was in the context of the
possibility of a court case if the police didn't offer compensation that
the solicitor and RL considered adequate. Without the possibility of
going to court RL would presumably have received minimum compensation.

We need to remember that any compensation paid is taxpayers' money. The
police shouldn't pay out more than they legally need to.

--
Peter Duncanson
(in uk.tech.digital-tv)
 




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