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  #51  
Old March 5th 18, 10:33 PM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
Peter Duncanson
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 4,272
Default Maplin RIP

On Mon, 5 Mar 2018 20:10:07 +0000, Max Demian
wrote:

On 05/03/2018 17:49, NY wrote:
"James Heaton" wrote in message
news
Asda used to require you to have cheques pre-cleared at a desk in the
store which was a right pain - I can't remember why/how as I was quite
young but remember my Mum moaning about it!


The ultimate shopper-unfriendly shop was Foyles bookshop in London where
it was one big shop but you had to pay for each book in the department
that it came from (so you had to queue up several times) rather than
being able to pay for all the books in one transaction at one till. With
an attitude like that, they didn't deserve to have any customers.


That's not how I remember it. Each department issued a chit and kept the
books. You queued up at a single cashier's kiosk in the middle of the
ground floor to pay, then had to return with the paid receipt(s) to the
department(s) to pick up the book(s).


It seems they hadn't installed the modern technology of a "pneumatic
tube system" by which a shop assistant could send the invoice and money
in a canister to a central cashier who did the necessary and returned
the change and receipt in the canister, while the customer stayed wwith
the assistant.

--
Peter Duncanson
(in uk.tech.digital-tv)
Ads
  #52  
Old March 6th 18, 08:43 AM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
NY
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 1,329
Default Maplin RIP

"Peter Duncanson" wrote in message
...
On Mon, 5 Mar 2018 20:10:07 +0000, Max Demian
wrote:

On 05/03/2018 17:49, NY wrote:
"James Heaton" wrote in message
news Asda used to require you to have cheques pre-cleared at a desk in the
store which was a right pain - I can't remember why/how as I was quite
young but remember my Mum moaning about it!


The ultimate shopper-unfriendly shop was Foyles bookshop in London where
it was one big shop but you had to pay for each book in the department
that it came from (so you had to queue up several times) rather than
being able to pay for all the books in one transaction at one till. With
an attitude like that, they didn't deserve to have any customers.


That's not how I remember it. Each department issued a chit and kept the
books. You queued up at a single cashier's kiosk in the middle of the
ground floor to pay, then had to return with the paid receipt(s) to the
department(s) to pick up the book(s).


It seems they hadn't installed the modern technology of a "pneumatic
tube system" by which a shop assistant could send the invoice and money
in a canister to a central cashier who did the necessary and returned
the change and receipt in the canister, while the customer stayed wwith
the assistant.


Ah. Maybe I've misremembered it slightly. I know it involved journeys
between the various different departments throughout the shop, and multiple
queuing (evidently to collect the books rather than to pay for them). Not
exactly shopper-friendly.

I wonder why they adopted this system, rather than letting you take the book
instead of the chit to the cashier, thus avoiding you having to return to
the department to collect the book.

  #53  
Old March 6th 18, 08:48 AM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
Woody[_5_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 1,865
Default Maplin RIP


"NY" wrote in message
...
"Peter Duncanson" wrote in message
...
On Mon, 5 Mar 2018 20:10:07 +0000, Max Demian

wrote:

On 05/03/2018 17:49, NY wrote:
"James Heaton" wrote in
message
news Asda used to require you to have cheques pre-cleared at a desk
in the
store which was a right pain - I can't remember why/how as I was
quite
young but remember my Mum moaning about it!


The ultimate shopper-unfriendly shop was Foyles bookshop in
London where
it was one big shop but you had to pay for each book in the
department
that it came from (so you had to queue up several times) rather
than
being able to pay for all the books in one transaction at one
till. With
an attitude like that, they didn't deserve to have any customers.

That's not how I remember it. Each department issued a chit and
kept the
books. You queued up at a single cashier's kiosk in the middle of
the
ground floor to pay, then had to return with the paid receipt(s) to
the
department(s) to pick up the book(s).


It seems they hadn't installed the modern technology of a
"pneumatic
tube system" by which a shop assistant could send the invoice and
money
in a canister to a central cashier who did the necessary and
returned
the change and receipt in the canister, while the customer stayed
wwith
the assistant.


Ah. Maybe I've misremembered it slightly. I know it involved
journeys between the various different departments throughout the
shop, and multiple queuing (evidently to collect the books rather
than to pay for them). Not exactly shopper-friendly.

I wonder why they adopted this system, rather than letting you take
the book instead of the chit to the cashier, thus avoiding you
having to return to the department to collect the book.



Modern supermarkets take your money at the till, but they still have
pneumatic pipe systems to carry large quantities of cash to the cash
office. Sainsbury use them - look for a small trapdoor on the bag
loading slope just past the scanner.


--
Woody

harrogate3 at ntlworld dot com


  #54  
Old March 6th 18, 09:34 AM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
charles[_2_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 699
Default Maplin RIP

In article , NY
wrote:
"Peter Duncanson" wrote in message
...
On Mon, 5 Mar 2018 20:10:07 +0000, Max Demian
wrote:

On 05/03/2018 17:49, NY wrote:
"James Heaton" wrote in message
news Asda used to require you to have cheques pre-cleared at a desk in
the store which was a right pain - I can't remember why/how as I was
quite young but remember my Mum moaning about it!


The ultimate shopper-unfriendly shop was Foyles bookshop in London
where it was one big shop but you had to pay for each book in the
department that it came from (so you had to queue up several times)
rather than being able to pay for all the books in one transaction at
one till. With an attitude like that, they didn't deserve to have any
customers.

That's not how I remember it. Each department issued a chit and kept
the books. You queued up at a single cashier's kiosk in the middle of
the ground floor to pay, then had to return with the paid receipt(s) to
the department(s) to pick up the book(s).


It seems they hadn't installed the modern technology of a "pneumatic
tube system" by which a shop assistant could send the invoice and money
in a canister to a central cashier who did the necessary and returned
the change and receipt in the canister, while the customer stayed wwith
the assistant.


Ah. Maybe I've misremembered it slightly. I know it involved journeys
between the various different departments throughout the shop, and
multiple queuing (evidently to collect the books rather than to pay for
them). Not exactly shopper-friendly.


I wonder why they adopted this system, rather than letting you take the
book instead of the chit to the cashier, thus avoiding you having to
return to the department to collect the book.


probably because they didn't trust either the staff or the customers

--
from KT24 in Surrey, England
  #55  
Old March 6th 18, 09:44 AM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
NY
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 1,329
Default Maplin RIP

"Woody" wrote in message
news
It seems they hadn't installed the modern technology of a "pneumatic
tube system" by which a shop assistant could send the invoice and money
in a canister to a central cashier who did the necessary and returned
the change and receipt in the canister, while the customer stayed wwith
the assistant.


Ah. Maybe I've misremembered it slightly. I know it involved journeys
between the various different departments throughout the shop, and
multiple queuing (evidently to collect the books rather than to pay for
them). Not exactly shopper-friendly.

I wonder why they adopted this system, rather than letting you take the
book instead of the chit to the cashier, thus avoiding you having to
return to the department to collect the book.



Modern supermarkets take your money at the till, but they still have
pneumatic pipe systems to carry large quantities of cash to the cash
office. Sainsbury use them - look for a small trapdoor on the bag loading
slope just past the scanner.


Yes, I first noticed these in Tesco in the 1990s and thought of the system
I'd seen at Beamish open air museum.

But the difference is: you take all your goods to one central place, pay for
them and leave. How the company transfers your money to its central cash
office is not a concern of the customer.

The problem was that not only did you have to visit more than one desk, and
queue up each time, but that you had to go to several desks depending on
which shelf you'd taken the book from.

Foyle's system was spectacularly inefficient in that you had to take each
book to the correct departmental desk, get a chit, take all those to the
cash desk and then go back to each department to collect the books. Whoever
devised that system must have *really* hated customers :-)

More than once I've been in Foyles and seen someone with a pile of books go
to a "cashier's desk" (as they think it is) and be told to take these books
to desk 1, those to desk 2 on the next floor down, this one to desk 3, then
go to the cashiers and then return each desk to collect the books. And the
customer response is "sod that for a lark - I'm off to Waterstones instead".

  #56  
Old March 6th 18, 10:32 AM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
Mark Carver[_2_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 439
Default Maplin RIP

On 05/03/2018 21:15, Marland wrote:


Anyone remember Carrefour in the UK? We had an enormous one in Caerphilly -



That was the first In the UK I believe
We had one on the outskirts of Eastleigh/Southampton .
It’s presence kick started some more businesses around it one being B and Q
whose headquarters is opposite, they had started not too far away in a
Southampton suburb.
Asda took over the store when Carrefour pulled out,did they take over the
others?


I seem to recall someone else had the store between Carrefour and Asda,
but I can't remember ?


--
Mark
Please replace invalid and invalid with gmx and net to reply.
  #57  
Old March 6th 18, 10:36 AM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
James Heaton
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 117
Default Maplin RIP


"Marland" wrote in message
...


Anyone remember Carrefour in the UK? We had an enormous one in
Caerphilly -



That was the first In the UK I believe
We had one on the outskirts of Eastleigh/Southampton .
It’s presence kick started some more businesses around it one being B and
Q
whose headquarters is opposite, they had started not too far away in a
Southampton suburb.
Asda took over the store when Carrefour pulled out,did they take over the
others?


The Caerphilly one certainly ended up with Asda, although I have a feeling
it may have passed through Gateway first. Demolished circa 1994, now a car
park for the Asda that was built on its car park if you see what I mean...

James

  #58  
Old March 6th 18, 10:49 AM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
Mark Carver[_2_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 439
Default Maplin RIP

On 06/03/2018 11:32, Mark Carver wrote:


I seem to recall someone else had the store between Carrefour and Asda,
but I can't remember ?


Answered my own question, it was Gateway

http://www.dailyecho.co.uk/news/11351910.Workers_mark_four_decades_of_hypermarket/


--
Mark
Please replace invalid and invalid with gmx and net to reply.
  #59  
Old March 6th 18, 11:13 AM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
charles[_2_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 699
Default Maplin RIP

In article , NY
wrote:
"Woody" wrote in message
news
It seems they hadn't installed the modern technology of a "pneumatic
tube system" by which a shop assistant could send the invoice and
money in a canister to a central cashier who did the necessary and
returned the change and receipt in the canister, while the customer
stayed wwith the assistant.

Ah. Maybe I've misremembered it slightly. I know it involved journeys
between the various different departments throughout the shop, and
multiple queuing (evidently to collect the books rather than to pay
for them). Not exactly shopper-friendly.

I wonder why they adopted this system, rather than letting you take
the book instead of the chit to the cashier, thus avoiding you having
to return to the department to collect the book.



Modern supermarkets take your money at the till, but they still have
pneumatic pipe systems to carry large quantities of cash to the cash
office. Sainsbury use them - look for a small trapdoor on the bag
loading slope just past the scanner.


Yes, I first noticed these in Tesco in the 1990s and thought of the
system I'd seen at Beamish open air museum.


But the difference is: you take all your goods to one central place, pay
for them and leave. How the company transfers your money to its central
cash office is not a concern of the customer.


The problem was that not only did you have to visit more than one desk,
and queue up each time, but that you had to go to several desks
depending on which shelf you'd taken the book from.


Foyle's system was spectacularly inefficient in that you had to take each
book to the correct departmental desk, get a chit, take all those to the
cash desk and then go back to each department to collect the books.
Whoever devised that system must have *really* hated customers :-)


More than once I've been in Foyles and seen someone with a pile of books
go to a "cashier's desk" (as they think it is) and be told to take these
books to desk 1, those to desk 2 on the next floor down, this one to
desk 3, then go to the cashiers and then return each desk to collect the
books. And the customer response is "sod that for a lark - I'm off to
Waterstones instead".


This doesn't apply in the new Foyles' shop.

--
from KT24 in Surrey, England
  #60  
Old March 6th 18, 08:39 PM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
Clive Page[_4_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 86
Default Maplin RIP

On 06/03/2018 10:44, NY wrote:

Foyle's system was spectacularly inefficient in that you had to take each book to the correct departmental desk, get a chit, take all those to the cash desk and then go back to each department to collect the books. Whoever devised that system must have *really* hated customers :-)


Indeed. It was, I understand, a system invented in Soviet Russia. I certainly saw the system in several shops in Moscow about 20 years ago. Now shops in Russia, and even Foyles, have switched to a more efficient system.


--
Clive Page
 




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