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uk.tech.digital-tv (Digital TV - General) (uk.tech.digital-tv) Discussion of all matters technical in origin related to the reception of digital television transmissions, be they via satellite, terrestrial or cable. Advertising is forbidden, with no exceptions.

Maplin RIP



 
 
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  #21  
Old March 1st 18, 09:08 PM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
Woody[_5_]
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Posts: 1,865
Default Maplin RIP


wrote in message
...
On Thursday, 1 March 2018 20:10:19 UTC, Woody wrote:
... Most people seem to think Waitrose expensive


It's not so much they're expensive; they just tend to sell expensive
things. Like my local Co-op. Their fair trade organic olive oil hand
stretched pizze are probably very competitively priced as far as fair
trade organic olive oil hand stretched pizze go, but they can't
compete with Aldi Value on price.



That was why I said 'grown-up' supermarkets - Aldi (and Lidl) are
nowhere near as big as even Waitrose although I cannot disagree with
the comment about comparative price.

I find it interesting that Aldi are always compared first in the UK
when IME experience there seem to be many more Lidl stores than Aldi
and in most cases again IME Lidl is a nicer place to shop. In Germany
Aldi is considered to be the bigger/better shop than Lidl, but in most
other western Europe countries (e.g. Benelux/France/Italy and
especially the Netherlands) Aldi tend to be relatively few and far
between, in scruffier areas, and nothing like such a nice place to
shop as Lidl.

And can anyone explain to me why the UK media persist in referring to
Aldi and Lidl as 'the discounters'? No they aren't, they just sell a
more limited range (but largely things that people want/need to buy
coupled with good fruit and veg and superb bread) at more competitive
prices. SPQR as they (used to) say?


--
Woody

harrogate3 at ntlworld dot com


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  #22  
Old March 1st 18, 09:23 PM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
Andy Burns[_12_]
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Posts: 573
Default Maplin RIP

Woody wrote:

I find it interesting that Aldi are always compared first in the UK
when IME experience there seem to be many more Lidl stores than Aldi


Round here, Aldi built more stores first, Lidl were in lower key
locations, though they have built more recently.

and in most cases again IME Lidl is a nicer place to shop.


I used to buy Lidl Tronic batteries, but the last ones they had on sale
were essentially fraudulent, presumably they'll skimp on other products
too ...
  #23  
Old March 2nd 18, 06:19 AM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
Tweed[_3_]
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Posts: 36
Default Maplin RIP

Andy Burns wrote:
Woody wrote:

I find it interesting that Aldi are always compared first in the UK
when IME experience there seem to be many more Lidl stores than Aldi


Round here, Aldi built more stores first, Lidl were in lower key
locations, though they have built more recently.

and in most cases again IME Lidl is a nicer place to shop.


I used to buy Lidl Tronic batteries, but the last ones they had on sale
were essentially fraudulent, presumably they'll skimp on other products
too ...


Lidl have “over 600” stores in the UK, Aldi “over 700” (2017 articles).
Both are expanding like mad at the moment.

  #24  
Old March 2nd 18, 08:41 AM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
Roderick Stewart[_3_]
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On Thu, 1 Mar 2018 22:08:41 -0000, "Woody"
wrote:

And can anyone explain to me why the UK media persist in referring to
Aldi and Lidl as 'the discounters'? No they aren't, they just sell a
more limited range (but largely things that people want/need to buy
coupled with good fruit and veg and superb bread) at more competitive
prices. SPQR as they (used to) say?


And you're not holding up the next customer while you pack your bags,
so the shop gets money through the tills faster, which is probably
another reason they're able to offer lower prices. It's such an
obvious way to save time, and therefore money, that I'm surprised the
other supermarkets don't seem to be considering it too.

Rod.
  #25  
Old March 2nd 18, 08:54 AM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
Roderick Stewart[_3_]
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Default Maplin RIP

On Thu, 1 Mar 2018 17:13:34 -0000, "NY" wrote:

What about post-related things like weighing large letters and parcels so
you can determine the correct postage to pay? Is that left to the honesty of
the punter and the assumptions that he will have enough stamps to make up
the postage required?


Trusting the honesty of the sender seems to work with Collect Plus.
You just weigh and measure your own parcel at home all by yourself,
enter the details on the website, download and print a barcode label
all by yourself on your own printer, slap it on the parcel and take it
to the nearest Collect Plus shop (or in my case petrol station), and
they just take it without any messing about. My family use it a lot
and it has always worked for us. It's much less frustrating than
queueing behind a dozen other people in a post office all waiting to
have the same things done for them.

They probably get a few customers who are either dishonest or stupid
about weights and measures (because some people just are), but if
there are any losses due to this, they can't be enough to make the
service uneconomic or it wouldn't still be available.

Rod.
  #26  
Old March 2nd 18, 08:57 AM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
Roderick Stewart[_3_]
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Posts: 2,246
Default Maplin RIP

On Thu, 1 Mar 2018 21:43:23 -0000, "tim..."
wrote:

First Tandy/Radio Shack, and now Maplin. Who next? Currys/PC world.

Some are saying WHS other than station branches.


That'll mean quite a few Post Offices disappearing too if correct.


I can't remember where it was but somewhere that I visited had a PO move
into a stationary store

the store closed down and was emptied of stock and the PO counter was still
open at the back


Our local post office has moved twice to the backs of shops like this,
a distance of about 100 yards each time. Its original building, where
it used to be just a post office, is still there, but for a number of
years it has been occupied by a wine bar called "Stamps".

Rod.
  #27  
Old March 2nd 18, 09:03 AM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
R. Mark Clayton[_2_]
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Posts: 649
Default Maplin RIP

On Thursday, 1 March 2018 22:23:14 UTC, Andy Burns wrote:
Woody wrote:

I find it interesting that Aldi are always compared first in the UK
when IME experience there seem to be many more Lidl stores than Aldi


Round here, Aldi built more stores first, Lidl were in lower key
locations, though they have built more recently.

and in most cases again IME Lidl is a nicer place to shop.


I used to buy Lidl Tronic batteries, but the last ones they had on sale
were essentially fraudulent, presumably they'll skimp on other products
too ...


They didn't skimp on the AA rechargeable batteries - they were oversize!
  #28  
Old March 2nd 18, 09:06 AM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
R. Mark Clayton[_2_]
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Posts: 649
Default Maplin RIP

On Thursday, 1 March 2018 21:47:01 UTC, tim... wrote:
"Woody" wrote in message
news

"Bill Wright" wrote in message
news
On 01/03/2018 15:02, Woody wrote:
"MR" wrote in message
...
First Tandy/Radio Shack, and now Maplin. Who next? Currys/PC world.



...if we are lucky!



I went to Currys to by a fridge. There were about thirty on display. None
of the three I was prepared to buy was in stock, or could even be
ordered.


I thought you were a JLP customer? They have them in stock or next day
delivery - like AO in most cases.


No they don't

It seems that most orders for white goods are now dropped-shipped from some
central warehouse regardless of where you buy them - online or at a store.

If it's out of stock via one retailer, it will be out of stock at all of
them

BTDTGTTS

tim


In the tale of the damaged goods, the [first] fridge freezer was definitely the one in the shop. Whether the dishwashers and two other fridge freezers were drop shipped I don't know, although IIRC the first delivery had both the following day.
  #29  
Old March 2nd 18, 09:32 AM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
Andy Burns[_12_]
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Posts: 573
Default Maplin RIP

R. Mark Clayton wrote:

They didn't skimp on the AA rechargeable batteries - they were oversize!


I don't *think* they're actually AAAs with AA overcoats, they're about
the same weight (capacity is under half that claimed).
  #30  
Old March 2nd 18, 09:46 AM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
NY
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Posts: 1,329
Default Maplin RIP

"Roderick Stewart" wrote in message
...
What about post-related things like weighing large letters and parcels so
you can determine the correct postage to pay? Is that left to the honesty
of
the punter and the assumptions that he will have enough stamps to make up
the postage required?


Trusting the honesty of the sender seems to work with Collect Plus.
You just weigh and measure your own parcel at home all by yourself,
enter the details on the website, download and print a barcode label
all by yourself on your own printer, slap it on the parcel and take it
to the nearest Collect Plus shop (or in my case petrol station), and
they just take it without any messing about.


Ah, I've never used Collect Plus for *sending* anything that I have to pay
for. The only time I've used it is for returning defective/damaged goods
that I've ordered from Amazon, and in that case the postage is paid by
Amazon so you don't need to weigh the package and generate a barcode that is
weight-dependent.

I suppose it will get to the stage that post offices gradually lose their
non-mail functions which get taken over by petrol stations etc. And only a
few main sorting offices remain open so you have to travel a long way and
pay to park in order to collect an item that the postman has been unable to
deliver. In our last house we were lucky that the sorting office was behind
a sub post office that was about 10 mins drive away and had free parking.
And our postman took the pragmatic approach of allowing a neighbour to sign
for recorded delivery or to take in items that were too large for the letter
box, rather than making us go to the sorting office. Occasionally I've been
driving through the village and seen his van, and if I'm expecting something
that needs signing he'll flash me or else I'll stop and catch him when he
gets back to his van; the first time I had to show him proof of ID, until he
recognised me.

 




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