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Sudden expenditure



 
 
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  #51  
Old March 1st 18, 11:22 PM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
Graham.[_12_]
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Posts: 472
Default Sudden expenditure

On 27/02/2018 11:51, Jim Lesurf wrote:

Anyway, I'm hoping that - from weather to examination - things go well on
Friday.


This'll cheer you up:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=W2gABYTmXos


J. B. S. Haldane wrote an ode about his cancer treatment in 1964 when
treatment positive outcomes were fewer than today. Even if you don't
look up the poem "Cancerís a Funny Thing", I can recommend that you
acquaint yourself with Haldene's life and work, he was a remarkable
stoic character.

Bill & Jim, my wishes for Quality Outcomes for you both.
--

Graham.
%Profound_observation%
Ads
  #52  
Old March 2nd 18, 07:57 AM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
Roderick Stewart[_3_]
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Posts: 2,246
Default Sudden expenditure

On Thu, 1 Mar 2018 11:58:08 -0000, Terry Casey
wrote:

I had the camera up the arse job without a GA and it was excruciating.

Bill


Interesting - I've had two without GA and the first one -
quite a few years ago now - didn't put me off not having a GA
for the second, recent one!

Not particular comfortable though, I'll admit!


When I had mine done (many years ago), I don't know exactly what they
gave me but it didn't put me completely out and it wasn't what I'd
describe as a local anaesthetic either. I recalled afterwards having
been dimly aware of sights and feelings but couldn't describe even to
myself exactly what they were. It wasn't uncomfortable or distressing
in any way, but most odd. When I woke up in a bed a few hours later it
just felt like waking up normally as you do in the morning, and being
vaguely aware of a weird dream, the details of which rapidly faded, as
dreams do. If I was able to remember any more details immediately
after waking, I don't remember them now.

The best bit was of course meeting the consultant again the next day
and being given the all clear.

Since then the NHS biennial **** kit has given reassuringly negative
results, and I have to say to anyone who has not yet attained the age
of 60 years that they have something interesting to look forward to.

Rod.
  #53  
Old March 2nd 18, 08:26 AM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
Jim Lesurf[_2_]
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Posts: 4,326
Default Sudden expenditure

In article , Graham.
wrote:

Bill & Jim, my wishes for Quality Outcomes for you both.


I was havering overnight wrt the weather as we still have an 'amber' alert
and things have been pretty bad in much of Fife/Tayside. I didn't really
want to have to travel 20 miles this morning, but also didn't want to have
to put it off and wait another month or so for the ultrasound scan.

My wife said she would insist on going with me if I went, but thought it
best to cancel and get a fresh appointment. So after some hesitation I
phoned the hospital to try and cancel, then get a fresh appointment.

This put my in an automated telephone 'queue', so I decided to try again a
bit later. However...

Ten mins later the hospital phoned me to say the consultant was snowed in
at home so all todays appointments had to be resheduled. I think this will
mean another month or so before I am seen.

The specific worry over the last day or two was wrt the weather and making
any arrangements at short notice if my wife was unwell. I guess this at
least gives us more time to consider things. The worry now is in case
things get worse over the next few weeks. Hard to tell, because the level
of symptoms varies but I haven't been able to determine what might be
causing the variations.

Jim

--
Please use the address on the audiomisc page if you wish to email me.
Electronics https://www.st-andrews.ac.uk/~www_pa...o/electron.htm
biog http://jcgl.orpheusweb.co.uk/history/ups_and_downs.html
Audio Misc http://www.audiomisc.co.uk/index.html

  #54  
Old March 2nd 18, 10:40 AM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
Bill Wright[_3_]
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Posts: 2,448
Default Sudden expenditure

On 02/03/2018 09:26, Jim Lesurf wrote:


The worry now is in case
things get worse over the next few weeks. Hard to tell, because the level
of symptoms varies but I haven't been able to determine what might be
causing the variations.


It's a constant drain of mental energy all this worry. It's terrible.
The imagination runs riot. I sometimes wish I was a chicken.

Bill
  #55  
Old March 2nd 18, 01:43 PM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
Max Demian
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Posts: 3,970
Default Sudden expenditure

On 02/03/2018 08:57, Roderick Stewart wrote:
On Thu, 1 Mar 2018 11:58:08 -0000, Terry Casey
wrote:

I had the camera up the arse job without a GA and it was excruciating.

Bill


Interesting - I've had two without GA and the first one -
quite a few years ago now - didn't put me off not having a GA
for the second, recent one!

Not particular comfortable though, I'll admit!


When I had mine done (many years ago), I don't know exactly what they
gave me but it didn't put me completely out and it wasn't what I'd
describe as a local anaesthetic either. I recalled afterwards having
been dimly aware of sights and feelings but couldn't describe even to
myself exactly what they were. It wasn't uncomfortable or distressing
in any way, but most odd. When I woke up in a bed a few hours later it
just felt like waking up normally as you do in the morning, and being
vaguely aware of a weird dream, the details of which rapidly faded, as
dreams do. If I was able to remember any more details immediately
after waking, I don't remember them now.

The best bit was of course meeting the consultant again the next day
and being given the all clear.

Since then the NHS biennial **** kit has given reassuringly negative
results, and I have to say to anyone who has not yet attained the age
of 60 years that they have something interesting to look forward to.


They stop sending them out at 74 to "normal" people (i.e. those who
haven't had treatment) unless you ask. Why is this I wonder? Is it that
if you haven't tested positive by then you will *never* get bowel cancer
(for some value of "never"), or is it just that there are so few people
over 74 it won't show up in the stats?

--
Max Demian
  #56  
Old March 2nd 18, 03:41 PM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
[email protected]
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Posts: 234
Default Sudden expenditure

On Friday, 2 March 2018 11:40:20 UTC, wrote:
It's a constant drain of mental energy all this worry. It's terrible.
The imagination runs riot. I sometimes wish I was a chicken.


I think chickens can worry.

Not sure about earthworms but I think I'll take a bit of worry now and then for beign a higher life form than a worm.

Owain
  #57  
Old March 2nd 18, 03:52 PM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
Woody[_5_]
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Posts: 1,865
Default Sudden expenditure


"Max Demian" wrote in message
o.uk...
On 02/03/2018 08:57, Roderick Stewart wrote:
On Thu, 1 Mar 2018 11:58:08 -0000, Terry Casey
wrote:

I had the camera up the arse job without a GA and it was
excruciating.

Bill

Interesting - I've had two without GA and the first one -
quite a few years ago now - didn't put me off not having a GA
for the second, recent one!

Not particular comfortable though, I'll admit!


When I had mine done (many years ago), I don't know exactly what
they
gave me but it didn't put me completely out and it wasn't what I'd
describe as a local anaesthetic either. I recalled afterwards
having
been dimly aware of sights and feelings but couldn't describe even
to
myself exactly what they were. It wasn't uncomfortable or
distressing
in any way, but most odd. When I woke up in a bed a few hours later
it
just felt like waking up normally as you do in the morning, and
being
vaguely aware of a weird dream, the details of which rapidly faded,
as
dreams do. If I was able to remember any more details immediately
after waking, I don't remember them now.

The best bit was of course meeting the consultant again the next
day
and being given the all clear.

Since then the NHS biennial **** kit has given reassuringly
negative
results, and I have to say to anyone who has not yet attained the
age
of 60 years that they have something interesting to look forward
to.


They stop sending them out at 74 to "normal" people (i.e. those who
haven't had treatment) unless you ask. Why is this I wonder? Is it
that if you haven't tested positive by then you will *never* get
bowel cancer (for some value of "never"), or is it just that there
are so few people over 74 it won't show up in the stats?



I heard from a friend a few days ago. His story is that he had trouble
collecting the sample, it fell on the bathroom floor and as he turned
round to see where it had landed he stood on it!

I found a good way. Get some of those thin aluminimum trays that you
Mum used to use to make apple pies, put one across the bowl, and
deposit into that. Getting a good clean(!) sample is a piece of cake -
or s**t if you prefer!


--
Woody

harrogate3 at ntlworld dot com


  #58  
Old March 2nd 18, 05:32 PM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
Roderick Stewart[_3_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 2,246
Default Sudden expenditure

On Fri, 2 Mar 2018 14:43:31 +0000, Max Demian
wrote:

Since then the NHS biennial **** kit has given reassuringly negative
results, and I have to say to anyone who has not yet attained the age
of 60 years that they have something interesting to look forward to.


They stop sending them out at 74 to "normal" people (i.e. those who
haven't had treatment) unless you ask. Why is this I wonder? Is it that
if you haven't tested positive by then you will *never* get bowel cancer
(for some value of "never"), or is it just that there are so few people
over 74 it won't show up in the stats?


I didn't know that. I expect it just means that if you haven't died of
bowel cancer by 74, you're more likely to die of something else. Or
you're dead already. Only another three for me to do before I need to
start worrying about it.

I keep thinking lately about that line in the Simon & Garfunkel song
that says "How terribly strange to be seventy". I never really
understood what they meant, but it really is strange, and I can't
quite believe it. What's even stranger is that they wrote it when they
were a lot younger, so how did they know what it would feel like?

Rod.
  #59  
Old March 3rd 18, 09:13 AM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
Roderick Stewart[_3_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 2,246
Default Sudden expenditure

On Fri, 02 Mar 2018 23:18:55 +0100, Martin wrote:

I found a good way. Get some of those thin aluminimum trays that you
Mum used to use to make apple pies, put one across the bowl, and
deposit into that. Getting a good clean(!) sample is a piece of cake -
or s**t if you prefer!


Import a Dutch toilet. They are designed with a viewing/sampling platform.


So that's what it's called - a "viewing/sampling platform". I've often
wondered what it was for. I just thought the Dutch were strange.

Dutch GP always want to know what your crap looks like.


Hmm. Maybe they are...

Rod.
  #60  
Old March 3rd 18, 09:23 AM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
NY
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Posts: 1,329
Default Sudden expenditure

"Martin" wrote in message
...
Import a Dutch toilet. They are designed with a viewing/sampling platform.
Dutch
GP always want to know what your crap looks like.


They have those in German too, especially in public loos in communal places
like railway stations, shopping centres, exhibition halls. The smell from
all the cubicles where the poo is above the waterline in each one is
appalling. When I went to Hannover on business (demonstrating my company's
product at the Hannover Fair), one of my colleagues who came with me
reckoned that the correct way to use those loos was to sit *facing* the
cistern so your poo went straight down the exit hole at the front of the
bowl, instead of collecting on the shelf.

 




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