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Sudden expenditure



 
 
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  #41  
Old February 28th 18, 08:10 PM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
critcher[_6_]
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Posts: 96
Default Sudden expenditure

On 28/02/2018 09:12, Bill Wright wrote:
On 27/02/2018 17:19, critcher wrote:


I have no doubt you have the character and resolution to see this
thing through, best of everything for the future.


Yes, now I'm a bit stronger I'm getting my old belligerent way back. I'm
shouting at the telly again, which Hil says is a good sign.

Bill



Any invasion of our body requires serious recuperation time, that is one
of the main problems with the NHS at the moment.
My mother had an op about 35-40 years ago, but after the op and when fit
enough she had R+R for 2 weeks at a local rest home. That ensures you
are free up a hospital bed and are fit enough to return home to the
rigours of normal life.
These days those rest homes are gone and the return to home life is
normally much quicker.
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  #42  
Old February 28th 18, 09:34 PM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
Norman Wells[_6_]
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Posts: 984
Default Sudden expenditure

On 28/02/2018 20:10, critcher wrote:
On 28/02/2018 09:12, Bill Wright wrote:
On 27/02/2018 17:19, critcher wrote:


I have no doubt you have the character and resolution to see this
thing through, best of everything for the future.


Yes, now I'm a bit stronger I'm getting my old belligerent way back.
I'm shouting at the telly again, which Hil says is a good sign.

Bill



Any invasion of our body requires serious recuperation time, that is one
of the main problems with the NHS at the moment.
My mother had an op about 35-40 years ago, but after the op and when fit
enough she had R+R for 2 weeks at a local rest home. That ensures you
are free up a hospital bed and are fit enough to return home to the
rigours of normal life.
These days those rest homes are gone and the return to home life is
normally much quicker.


But then, surgical procedures have improved remarkably. Many are
keyhole procedures or minimally invasive, anaesthetics are much better,
and so on. Recovery times are not as long as they used to be 40 years ago.
  #43  
Old March 1st 18, 04:45 AM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
Johnny B Good[_2_]
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Posts: 513
Default Sudden expenditure

On Wed, 28 Feb 2018 08:38:34 +0000, Indy Jess John wrote:

On 28/02/2018 00:31, Davey wrote:
On Tue, 27 Feb 2018 22:56:20 +0000 tony
wrote:

24 hours before the event one was told to consume some Fleet mix. This
cleans the pipes of the brown stuff and it sure does what it sez on
the tin!..


My first two colonoscopies were done in the USA. For the first one, I
was given the jug of stuff, and it said that soon after starting to
take it, it would make me want to go to the toilet. The instructions
basically said;
"Go to the toilet. Do not stop on the way, do not pass 'Go', do not
collect $200. Just go to the bathroom without stopping".

It was very good advice, that stuff worked.

Some years ago I found a thread in a newsgroup, and I couldn't decide
whether it was factual or a joke. It was entertaining though, so I took
a copy. Enjoy!
https://www.dropbox.com/s/cgd577h5l1...colax.txt?dl=0


It's essentially based on fact as far as I can recall[1]. However, a lot
(though not all) appears to have been exaggerated slightly for comic
effect. Also, the teller of that tale seems to have been a bit of a wimp
imo. :-)

[1] I landed up as an emergency admission to my local hospital about 18
years ago with a stricture of the bowel and spent one of the worst
fortnights of my life in the GI ward whilst they (dangerously as a I
later found out) tried to get things moving again with Agent Picolax
whilst still trying to get me to eat the worst hospital food it has been
my displeasure to have ever experienced.

In the meantime, I was subjected to a barium enema which was extremely
uncomfortable to endure, the results of which were later lost due to to
contamination of the X-Ray records by a leak in the hospital's toilet
waste system which had flooded the clinical records room. This
necessitated a further, even more uncomfortable, Barium enema (apparently
it's rather unusual to subject patients to more than one such examination
in a year) which failed to fully image the full extent of the stricture.

Now that I think about it all, my recollection of the timeline is now
rather hazy but ISTR wondering whether the original Barium enema may have
preceded my emergency admission and possibly may even have triggered the
stricture that landed me in the hospital emergency ward in the first
place.

Eventually, in the third week of my initial stay, my bowels eventually
allowed the **** to pass and I was allowed to go back home on a bland low
fibre diet whilst they scheduled a "Planned Operation" several months
later. On admission, I had been considered for emergency surgery which
carries greater risk, especially for someone who has only one kidney (the
result of a Nephrectomy some 26 years earlier).

I was admitted for the promised "planned operation" a few months later
where, afaicr, some 12cms of shrivelled bowel was removed and resectioned
to excise the 'stricture' which, mercifully proved not to be cancerous
(my main worry at the time). The op was planned insomuch as the surgery
involved two teams, one the primary GI surgical team and a Urological
surgical team to make certain the primary surgical procedure didn't
damage my one remaining ureter (I'd had a uretic stent inserted just
prior to the bowel op to facilitate its identification).

This too, btw, involved yet another session with Agent Picolax starting
the evening before. This took so long to clear my bowels out I was still
going to the bog right up until 7am just a few hours before the op was
scheduled to start. I was absolutely knackered from all the effort and a
total lack of sleep by the time I was collected from the ward shortly
after expending my last reserves of energy showering myself clean for the
'Big Event'.

I had to have a follow up colonoscopy some 3 or 4 months later as a
check on the efficacy of my GI surgeon's handiwork which proved to be ok.
Needless to say, this involved yet another dose of Agent Picolax, the
second of which was administered just a few hours prior to the
examination in the day ward. I'm not sure what they'd hoped to achieve
since I still had an Ileostomy to rest my bowel so, of course it had no
effect on my lower GI tract, indeed the experience, such as it was,
offered only a very mild discomfort this time round.

I eventually had the Ileostomy reversed a few months after that and was
discharged with a 'clean bill of health' by my surgeon who commented that
I'd probably be back for more bowel surgery in ten years or so time, a
prognosis that remains unfulfilled to this day some 18 years on with no
sign of any impending bowel problems thus far.

The only other noteworthy observation I can offer is that modern post
operative pain management, even by the turn of this century, has improved
out of all recognition in the intervening half century since I had my
Nephrectomy way back in 1974 when the only effective pain relief took the
form of intramuscular morphine injections no more frequently than every 6
hours. It was effective whilst it lasted. Unfortunately, it rarely lasted
longer than 3 or 4 hours at most, leaving me wishing the next 2 or 3
hours away whilst awaiting the next dose of pain relief.

After returning from my bowel surgery, I was on an epidural drip for the
next two or three days which was remarkably effective. No post op pain
whatsoever! It was a remarkable contrast to my previous experience some
26 years before. Mind you, knowing all too well about the deleterious
effects of opioid pain treatment on the GI tract, I suspect this
marvellous pain management choice was no accident in the case of my bowel
surgery.

The pain management employed for the relatively trivial reversal of my
Ileostomy was a less luxurious form of pain management known as, afaicr,
"The Black Watch" which allowed the patient to self administer an
intravenously delivered opiate based pain killer via a dose limiting
device that looked remarkably like an old fashioned LED display quartz
watch.

Trials had proved that such patient controlled drug delivery systems
tended to reduce the average dosage levels compared to the more
traditional pain relief management methods. Giving the patient such
limited control over their own pain management meant they only tended to
'hit the button' when the pain became truly unbearable, often after much
longer intervals between doses than those administered on a fixed
schedule.

It certainly worked for me since I saw the process of resisting the urge
to hit the button as a bit of a challenge and also, being able to go for
ever longer periods, as a reassuring indication that the pain was fading
away with time as a part of the natural healing process. TBH, there
wasn't really that much post op pain with my Ileostomy reversal to begin
with so I think I was able to go back home after just a couple of days or
so.

--
Johnny B Good
  #44  
Old March 1st 18, 05:12 AM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
Johnny B Good[_2_]
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Posts: 513
Default Sudden expenditure

On Tue, 27 Feb 2018 12:15:10 +0000, Norman Wells wrote:

On 27/02/2018 11:51, Jim Lesurf wrote:

Anyway, I'm hoping that - from weather to examination - things go well
on Friday.


This'll cheer you up:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=W2gABYTmXos


Strangely enough, I think[1] I mentioned that very song to my own
colorectal surgeon way back in 2000/2001. It was on Youtube some 17 or 18
years ago, probably not that very movie clip, more likely just as a music
clip with slideshow but, nevertheless, it was available in one form or
another at that time.

I wasn't too sure whether he might have been offended so I may have only
*considered* mentioning it.

--
Johnny B Good
  #45  
Old March 1st 18, 05:27 AM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
Johnny B Good[_2_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 513
Default Sudden expenditure

On Wed, 28 Feb 2018 09:12:41 +0000, Bill Wright wrote:

On 27/02/2018 17:19, critcher wrote:


I have no doubt you have the character and resolution to see this thing
through, best of everything for the future.


Yes, now I'm a bit stronger I'm getting my old belligerent way back. I'm
shouting at the telly again, which Hil says is a good sign.


Blimey, Bill! You've got a lovely missus there, you lucky dog. I can't
even whisper snarky comments about the adverts without SWMBI taking them
personally and getting all upset with me. Our tastes in TV viewing
diverged radically some 20 odd years back and we rarely sit down together
to watch TV programmes other than for "Eggheads" at teatime when we sit
down to eat in the dining room and sometimes "Great British Railway
Journeys" which follows "Eggheads".

My missus may know me better than I know myself but she sure as hell
doesn't understand me. :-(

--
Johnny B Good
  #46  
Old March 1st 18, 05:32 AM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
Johnny B Good[_2_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 513
Default Sudden expenditure

On Wed, 28 Feb 2018 21:34:41 +0000, Norman Wells wrote:

On 28/02/2018 20:10, critcher wrote:
On 28/02/2018 09:12, Bill Wright wrote:
On 27/02/2018 17:19, critcher wrote:


I have no doubt you have the character and resolution to see this
thing through, best of everything for the future.

Yes, now I'm a bit stronger I'm getting my old belligerent way back.
I'm shouting at the telly again, which Hil says is a good sign.

Bill



Any invasion of our body requires serious recuperation time, that is
one of the main problems with the NHS at the moment.
My mother had an op about 35-40 years ago, but after the op and when
fit enough she had R+R for 2 weeks at a local rest home. That ensures
you are free up a hospital bed and are fit enough to return home to the
rigours of normal life.
These days those rest homes are gone and the return to home life is
normally much quicker.


But then, surgical procedures have improved remarkably. Many are
keyhole procedures or minimally invasive, anaesthetics are much better,
and so on. Recovery times are not as long as they used to be 40 years
ago.


Not only that but it's also worth remembering that effective post
operative pain management today makes a major positive contribution to
the ultimate outcome any such surgical procedure.

--
Johnny B Good
  #47  
Old March 1st 18, 06:30 AM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
Norman Wells[_6_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 984
Default Sudden expenditure

On 01/03/2018 05:12, Johnny B Good wrote:
On Tue, 27 Feb 2018 12:15:10 +0000, Norman Wells wrote:

On 27/02/2018 11:51, Jim Lesurf wrote:

Anyway, I'm hoping that - from weather to examination - things go well
on Friday.


This'll cheer you up:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=W2gABYTmXos


Strangely enough, I think[1] I mentioned that very song to my own
colorectal surgeon way back in 2000/2001. It was on Youtube some 17 or 18
years ago, probably not that very movie clip, more likely just as a music
clip with slideshow but, nevertheless, it was available in one form or
another at that time.

I wasn't too sure whether he might have been offended so I may have only
*considered* mentioning it.


I don't think he would have been. It was written for and performed at a
US convention for colorectal surgeons, and they seemed amused enough.

  #48  
Old March 1st 18, 11:58 AM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
Terry Casey[_2_]
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Posts: 768
Default Sudden expenditure

In article ,
says...


I had the camera up the arse job without a GA and it was excruciating.

Bill


Interesting - I've had two without GA and the first one -
quite a few years ago now - didn't put me off not having a GA
for the second, recent one!

Not particular comfortable though, I'll admit!

The first time they gave me a very powerful enema shortly
beforehand but, for the recent one, it was the Picolax route!

There was a problem with the second one as they couldn't get
the camera all the way up, for some reason. I know they tried
hard from the dull pain every time they tried something
different. Anyway, they decided that the final part of the
examination would have to be done by X-ray.

It wasn't like any X-ray machine I've seen before, though!

I was loaded into a very large spin drier drum which rotated
at a variety of speeds from moderate to blindingly fast -
fortunately, the contents didn't rotate as well!

So far, so good, but everything's gone quiet in the last few
weeks - presumably I've been put on the back burner of non-
emergency cases while the NHS deals with the winter 'bulge' in
demand...

Good luck to you Bill and, of course, Jim and Martin as well.


--

Terry

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  #49  
Old March 1st 18, 03:16 PM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
Jim Lesurf[_2_]
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Posts: 4,326
Default Sudden expenditure

In article , Martin
wrote:

There's only a shortage of hospital beds because somebody decided there
were too many, closed many hospitals and reduced the number of beds in
remaining hospitals


That isn't the only reason in the UK. It is also a real problem that our
health and care system is divided. NHS runs hospitals. Councils and Private
run care services.

Councils have been even more starved of support than the NHS because
National Government can then blame councils for not doing what is expected.

So we have a 'bed blocking' problem where people who have been treated in a
hospital can't be discharged and free the bed. There is a lack of either a
care home or a home carer to look after them.

The home care would be cheaper, but is more easily dodged as an expense by
national goverment, and just then blamed on the councils - whilst the
government impedes the ability of councils to raise money.

There are attempts to integrate the systems. But they tend to flounder on
the lack of money and two sides arguing over the same meal. When there
isn't enough cash, each side tries to manipulate the other into paying.

Jim

--
Please use the address on the audiomisc page if you wish to email me.
Electronics https://www.st-andrews.ac.uk/~www_pa...o/electron.htm
biog http://jcgl.orpheusweb.co.uk/history/ups_and_downs.html
Audio Misc http://www.audiomisc.co.uk/index.html

  #50  
Old March 1st 18, 04:41 PM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
charles[_2_]
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Posts: 699
Default Sudden expenditure

In article , Jim Lesurf
wrote:
In article , Martin
wrote:


There's only a shortage of hospital beds because somebody decided there
were too many, closed many hospitals and reduced the number of beds in
remaining hospitals


That isn't the only reason in the UK. It is also a real problem that our
health and care system is divided. NHS runs hospitals. Councils and
Private run care services.


Councils have been even more starved of support than the NHS because
National Government can then blame councils for not doing what is
expected.


So we have a 'bed blocking' problem where people who have been treated in
a hospital can't be discharged and free the bed. There is a lack of
either a care home or a home carer to look after them.


The home care would be cheaper, but is more easily dodged as an expense
by national goverment, and just then blamed on the councils - whilst the
government impedes the ability of councils to raise money.


There are attempts to integrate the systems. But they tend to flounder on
the lack of money and two sides arguing over the same meal. When there
isn't enough cash, each side tries to manipulate the other into paying.


further to all that, there is Care in the Community which transferred tehn
costs of long term in patients on to Councils. Surrey had 3 large
institutions in Epsom - the cost to their budget has been enormous.

--
from KT24 in Surrey, England
 




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