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Rugby - live in 1937?



 
 
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  #11  
Old February 25th 18, 07:55 PM posted to rec.sport.rugby.union,uk.tech.digital-tv
James Heaton
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 117
Default Rugby - live in 1937?


"Graham Harrison" wrote in message
news
On Sat, 24 Feb 2018 17:01:44 +0000, Scott
wrote:

The commentator says the first live TV broadcast of the rugby
international was 80 years ago, in 1938.

How did they do that? There was only one transmitter (Alexandra
Palace) and the match was presumably played at Murrayfield or
Twickenham. Would GPO lines be used? Which system was used - Baird
or Marconi?


According to Radio Times listings from genome.ch.bbc.co.uk the first
broadcast of Rugby was 19 March 1938 at 1450hrs.


England vs. Scotland was indeed played in the Home Nations championship that
day, at Twickenham. (It had ceased to be the 5 nations in the early 30s,
becoming so again after the war)

It was the final game of that year's championship; Scotland won 21-16 and
took the triple crown. (31-17 in today's scoring system)

http://en.espn.co.uk/six-nations-201...ry/179012.html

James

x-posted to RU group, although that's pretty much defunct now, in the hope
it's of interest to someone!

Ads
  #12  
Old February 25th 18, 08:07 PM posted to rec.sport.rugby.union,uk.tech.digital-tv
de chucka
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 1
Default Rugby - live in 1937?

On 26/02/2018 7:55 AM, James Heaton wrote:

"Graham Harrison" wrote in message
news
On Sat, 24 Feb 2018 17:01:44 +0000, Scott
wrote:

The commentator says the first live TV broadcast of the rugby
international was 80 years ago, in 1938.

How did they do that?* There was only one transmitter (Alexandra
Palace) and the match was presumably played at Murrayfield or
Twickenham.* Would GPO lines be used?* Which system was used - Baird
or Marconi?


According to Radio Times listings from genome.ch.bbc.co.uk the first
broadcast of Rugby was 19 March 1938 at 1450hrs.


England vs. Scotland was indeed played in the Home Nations championship
that day, at Twickenham.* (It had ceased to be the 5 nations in the
early 30s, becoming so again after the war)

It was the final game of that year's championship; Scotland won 21-16
and took the triple crown.* (31-17 in today's scoring system)

http://en.espn.co.uk/six-nations-201...ry/179012.html

James

x-posted to RU group, although that's pretty much defunct now, in the
hope it's of interest to someone!


thanks I found it interesting. I hope all the old rsru mob are enjoying FB

  #13  
Old February 25th 18, 10:58 PM posted to rec.sport.rugby.union,uk.tech.digital-tv
John Williams
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 1
Default Rugby - live in 1937?

On Sun, 25 Feb 2018 20:55:51 -0000, "James Heaton"
wrote:


"Graham Harrison" wrote in message
news
On Sat, 24 Feb 2018 17:01:44 +0000, Scott
wrote:

The commentator says the first live TV broadcast of the rugby
international was 80 years ago, in 1938.

How did they do that? There was only one transmitter (Alexandra
Palace) and the match was presumably played at Murrayfield or
Twickenham. Would GPO lines be used? Which system was used - Baird
or Marconi?


According to Radio Times listings from genome.ch.bbc.co.uk the first
broadcast of Rugby was 19 March 1938 at 1450hrs.


England vs. Scotland was indeed played in the Home Nations championship that
day, at Twickenham. (It had ceased to be the 5 nations in the early 30s,
becoming so again after the war)

It was the final game of that year's championship; Scotland won 21-16 and
took the triple crown. (31-17 in today's scoring system)

http://en.espn.co.uk/six-nations-201...ry/179012.html

James

x-posted to RU group, although that's pretty much defunct now, in the hope
it's of interest to someone!


Hah, you can't coax me into Satan's armpit with interesting posts...
Why not all come back to RSRU now it is a hidden gem?

Pip pip

--

All the best
John Williams
  #14  
Old February 26th 18, 02:45 PM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
tony sayer
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 5,001
Default Rugby - live in 1937?

In article , R.
Mark Clayton scribeth thus
On Saturday, 24 February 2018 20:59:33 UTC, charles wrote:
In article ,
Scott wrote:
The commentator says the first live TV broadcast of the rugby
international was 80 years ago, in 1938.


How did they do that? There was only one transmitter (Alexandra
Palace) and the match was presumably played at Murrayfield or
Twickenham. Would GPO lines be used? Which system was used - Baird
or Marconi?


Pawley mentions coverage of Wimbledon in 1937 using a radio link to get
pictures back to the studio. I assume the same could have been used at
Twickenham a year later. The EMI system had been formally adopted in Feb
1937.

--
from KT24 in Surrey, England


I think that was the first "outside broadcast" of a sports event.

Fairly easy to get line of sight from all three sports venues mentioned to
Alexandra Palace, so probably just wireless relay.

Although both Baird and EMI system were used from the start of broadcasts in
November 1936, the 405 line electronic system was predominantly used (and
remained in service for nearly fifty years apart from the war).


Interesting report here one of the earliest re TV at the BBC on the OB
link on the 60 Megacycle frequency and the problems they had with visual
"splashes" receiving TV OB's at Ally Pally and the reason they developed
the swains lane site quite interesting reading there is another one re
the problems with the equipment in use seems it badly needed a bit of a
service and theres also a report on the high wind that bought the wooden
mast at Swains lane down in a gale!.

If the link below don't work just do a Google on the line below..

BBC research REPORT No. T.003.

https://www.google.co.uk/url?sa=t&rc...eb&cd=2&cad=rj
a&uact=8&ved=0ahUKEwjhqfra9MPZAhVQasAKHX9uDl0QFggz MAE&url=http%3A%2F%2Fd
ownloads.bbc.co.uk%2Frd%2Fpubs%2Freports%2F1938-15.pdf&usg=AOvVaw3w-
a2t4-6rHePauNCNrPYc
--
Tony Sayer



  #15  
Old February 26th 18, 03:21 PM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
Peter Duncanson
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 4,272
Default Rugby - live in 1937?

On Mon, 26 Feb 2018 15:45:39 +0000, tony sayer
wrote:

In article , R.
Mark Clayton scribeth thus
On Saturday, 24 February 2018 20:59:33 UTC, charles wrote:
In article ,
Scott wrote:
The commentator says the first live TV broadcast of the rugby
international was 80 years ago, in 1938.

How did they do that? There was only one transmitter (Alexandra
Palace) and the match was presumably played at Murrayfield or
Twickenham. Would GPO lines be used? Which system was used - Baird
or Marconi?

Pawley mentions coverage of Wimbledon in 1937 using a radio link to get
pictures back to the studio. I assume the same could have been used at
Twickenham a year later. The EMI system had been formally adopted in Feb
1937.

--
from KT24 in Surrey, England


I think that was the first "outside broadcast" of a sports event.

Fairly easy to get line of sight from all three sports venues mentioned to
Alexandra Palace, so probably just wireless relay.

Although both Baird and EMI system were used from the start of broadcasts in
November 1936, the 405 line electronic system was predominantly used (and
remained in service for nearly fifty years apart from the war).


Interesting report here one of the earliest re TV at the BBC on the OB
link on the 60 Megacycle frequency and the problems they had with visual
"splashes" receiving TV OB's at Ally Pally and the reason they developed
the swains lane site quite interesting reading there is another one re
the problems with the equipment in use seems it badly needed a bit of a
service and theres also a report on the high wind that bought the wooden
mast at Swains lane down in a gale!.

If the link below don't work just do a Google on the line below..

BBC research REPORT No. T.003.

https://www.google.co.uk/url?sa=t&rc...eb&cd=2&cad=rj
a&uact=8&ved=0ahUKEwjhqfra9MPZAhVQasAKHX9uDl0QFgg zMAE&url=http%3A%2F%2Fd
ownloads.bbc.co.uk%2Frd%2Fpubs%2Freports%2F1938-15.pdf&usg=AOvVaw3w-
a2t4-6rHePauNCNrPYc


That leads to:
http://downloads.bbc.co.uk/rd/pubs/reports/1938-15.pdf


--
Peter Duncanson
(in uk.tech.digital-tv)
  #16  
Old February 27th 18, 09:33 PM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
tony sayer
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 5,001
Default Rugby - live in 1937?

In article , Peter Duncanson
scribeth thus
On Mon, 26 Feb 2018 15:45:39 +0000, tony sayer
wrote:

In article , R.
Mark Clayton scribeth thus
On Saturday, 24 February 2018 20:59:33 UTC, charles wrote:
In article ,
Scott wrote:
The commentator says the first live TV broadcast of the rugby
international was 80 years ago, in 1938.

How did they do that? There was only one transmitter (Alexandra
Palace) and the match was presumably played at Murrayfield or
Twickenham. Would GPO lines be used? Which system was used - Baird
or Marconi?

Pawley mentions coverage of Wimbledon in 1937 using a radio link to get
pictures back to the studio. I assume the same could have been used at
Twickenham a year later. The EMI system had been formally adopted in Feb
1937.

--
from KT24 in Surrey, England

I think that was the first "outside broadcast" of a sports event.

Fairly easy to get line of sight from all three sports venues mentioned to
Alexandra Palace, so probably just wireless relay.

Although both Baird and EMI system were used from the start of broadcasts in
November 1936, the 405 line electronic system was predominantly used (and
remained in service for nearly fifty years apart from the war).


Interesting report here one of the earliest re TV at the BBC on the OB
link on the 60 Megacycle frequency and the problems they had with visual
"splashes" receiving TV OB's at Ally Pally and the reason they developed
the swains lane site quite interesting reading there is another one re
the problems with the equipment in use seems it badly needed a bit of a
service and theres also a report on the high wind that bought the wooden
mast at Swains lane down in a gale!.

If the link below don't work just do a Google on the line below..

BBC research REPORT No. T.003.

https://www.google.co.uk/url?sa=t&rc...eb&cd=2&cad=rj
a&uact=8&ved=0ahUKEwjhqfra9MPZAhVQasAKHX9uDl0QFg gzMAE&url=http%3A%2F%2Fd
ownloads.bbc.co.uk%2Frd%2Fpubs%2Freports%2F193 8-15.pdf&usg=AOvVaw3w-
a2t4-6rHePauNCNrPYc


That leads to:
http://downloads.bbc.co.uk/rd/pubs/reports/1938-15.pdf



Thats the one but there is another, dammed if i can remember the report
name now

--
Tony Sayer



 




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