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Free Book :-)



 
 
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  #31  
Old February 24th 18, 05:34 PM posted to uk.rec.audio,uk.tech.digital-tv
RJH[_3_]
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Posts: 16
Default Free Book :-)

On 24/02/2018 14:56, Jim Lesurf wrote:
In article , pamela
wrote:

I can imagine some students might sign up for this and find more maths
than they expected. Well, I suppose it's no bad thing to grind a bit
of rigourous thought into young minds.


FWIW One of the reasons I wrote the book was that most of the existing
alternative texts had far *more* maths per page, and less explanatory text!

The result was books which even *lecturers* failed to understand, but felt
"must be good" because it looked impressive. Example of the story of two
people coming out of a talk, one saying to the other: "He must be clever, I
didn't understand a word he said!" 8-]

Sadly, this also means that many of the textbooks I found on IT and also EM
contained erronious arguments or 'proofs' which had been duly copied from
one book to another. Presumably because generations of authors didn't
understand but assume it "must be correct".

However the maths I used should be quite within the grasp of an honours
student in physical science or engineering. Tools of the trade.


From a quick look, I'd have hoped so. I think (even) I can follow most
of the calculations, even if I don't understand the 'why' - say, the
basis of assumptions.

Incidentally, did many of your students enrol on non-honours degrees?

--
Cheers, Rob
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  #32  
Old February 24th 18, 05:36 PM posted to uk.rec.audio,uk.tech.digital-tv
RJH[_3_]
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Posts: 16
Default Free Book :-)

On 22/02/2018 16:34, Jim Lesurf wrote:
In article , Dave W
wrote:
It does indeed seem ungrateful, but if I'd written the book I would be
eager to know about any defects in case I could do something about them.
Now Jim has done that.


TBH It just nudged my conscience into getting me to do what I felt I should
have done in the first place. :-)


Actually, very minor thing - while the word search seems to work on
Acrobat on a Mac - it's very erratic using the native Mac pdf viewer
(Preview). Just saying :-)


--
Cheers, Rob
  #33  
Old February 24th 18, 06:30 PM posted to uk.rec.audio,uk.tech.digital-tv
Max Demian
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Posts: 3,970
Default Free Book :-)

On 24/02/2018 18:11, Mark Carver wrote:
On 21/02/2018 15:29, Max Demian wrote:
On 21/02/2018 00:22, Dave Plowman (News) wrote:


I rather liked MiniDisc. For a while before computer based systems
arrived. Far better than NAB carts, and much cheaper too.


I assume you mean 8-tracks - they aren't quite the same.


No, I suspect Dave meant the NAB carts that were used in broadcasting to
play jingles, adverts, and sound effects. Industry standard from the 60s
until MD based systems came along to replace them. Today of course HDD
based/servers are used


So they used MiniDisc for jingles and adverts &c.?

--
Max Demian
  #34  
Old February 24th 18, 07:37 PM posted to uk.rec.audio,uk.tech.digital-tv
Mike Fleming
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Posts: 1
Default Free Book :-)

In article , Jim Lesurf
writes:

However the maths I used should be quite within the grasp of an honours
student in physical science or engineering. Tools of the trade. Although I
do wonder if people now use computer programs without a clue how they work.


At a brief perusal, I'd say it looks like an ideal opportunity to
extend my maths knowledge beyond the O-levels I did 45 years ago. And,
as an applications programmer, I can assure you that not only do our
users use programs without having a clue how they work, programmers
who inherit dreadfully-written [1] systems also don't have a clue how
they work, they just know that they almost always do.

[1] ie. any system composed of programs not written by them

--
Mike Fleming
  #35  
Old February 24th 18, 08:49 PM posted to uk.rec.audio,uk.tech.digital-tv
Bill Wright[_3_]
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Posts: 2,448
Default Free Book :-)

On 24/02/2018 13:25, pamela wrote:

I can imagine some students might sign up for this and find more maths
than they expected. Well, I suppose it's no bad thing to grind a bit
of rigourous thought into young minds.


Rigorous thought? "Err, shall we go to the Black Bull tonight or the
King William IV?"

Students are just machines for converting parent's money into ****.

Bill
  #36  
Old February 24th 18, 09:35 PM posted to uk.rec.audio,uk.tech.digital-tv
Indy Jess John
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Posts: 1,307
Default Free Book :-)

On 24/02/2018 20:37, Mike Fleming wrote:

programmers
who inherit dreadfully-written [1] systems also don't have a clue how
they work, they just know that they almost always do.

[1] ie. any system composed of programs not written by them

Back in the 1960s, I inherited some of them, poorly documented and
almost impossible to follow the logic because various conditions in past
records had set markers which following records checked for and took
alternate paths depending on what was set and what wasn't.

On the day that the output was noticeably wrong, it proved impossible to
work out what records had set what conditions that screwed up the
processing.

After trying to dry run it for a couple of hours, I decided that it
would be quicker and easier to rewrite the program from scratch, which I
ended up doing.

Jim

  #37  
Old February 24th 18, 10:47 PM posted to uk.rec.audio,uk.tech.digital-tv
Dave Plowman (News)
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Posts: 5,342
Default Free Book :-)

In article ,
Max Demian wrote:
On 24/02/2018 18:11, Mark Carver wrote:
On 21/02/2018 15:29, Max Demian wrote:
On 21/02/2018 00:22, Dave Plowman (News) wrote:


I rather liked MiniDisc. For a while before computer based systems
arrived. Far better than NAB carts, and much cheaper too.

I assume you mean 8-tracks - they aren't quite the same.


No, I suspect Dave meant the NAB carts that were used in broadcasting to
play jingles, adverts, and sound effects. Industry standard from the 60s
until MD based systems came along to replace them. Today of course HDD
based/servers are used


So they used MiniDisc for jingles and adverts &c.?


I dunno. I certainly used them in place of carts. But not really for
jingles or adverts.

There were a few oddball systems around for a few years before servers
took over.

--
*There are two sides to every divorce: Yours and **** head's*

Dave Plowman London SW
To e-mail, change noise into sound.
  #39  
Old February 25th 18, 07:18 AM posted to uk.rec.audio,uk.tech.digital-tv
Mark Carver[_2_]
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Posts: 439
Default Free Book :-)

On 24/02/2018 19:30, Max Demian wrote:


So they used MiniDisc for jingles and adverts &c.?


Yep

https://rapmag.com/a/1990s/286-94/aug94/1164-test-drive-denon-dn-990r-and-dn-980f-minidisc-cart-recorder-and-player

--
Mark
Please replace invalid and invalid with gmx and net to reply.
  #40  
Old February 25th 18, 08:12 AM posted to uk.rec.audio,uk.tech.digital-tv
Jim Lesurf[_2_]
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Posts: 4,326
Default Free Book :-)

In article , Huge
wrote:
On 2018-02-24, Jim Lesurf wrote:


Although I do wonder if people now use computer programs without a
clue how they work.


O


You wonder? Wow. 99.99% of computer users haven't the faintest idea how
the programs they use work!


I was wondering how many professional engineers or scientists do so. e.g.
use tools like MathCad, etc, whilst having no real idea how they work or of
the commands they gave are the correct/relevant ones and can be expected to
give an appropriate 'answer'. More than once I've found (professional)
people engaging in GIGO.

Jim

--
Please use the address on the audiomisc page if you wish to email me.
Electronics https://www.st-andrews.ac.uk/~www_pa...o/electron.htm
biog http://jcgl.orpheusweb.co.uk/history/ups_and_downs.html
Audio Misc http://www.audiomisc.co.uk/index.html

 




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