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uk.tech.digital-tv (Digital TV - General) (uk.tech.digital-tv) Discussion of all matters technical in origin related to the reception of digital television transmissions, be they via satellite, terrestrial or cable. Advertising is forbidden, with no exceptions.

New technologies?



 
 
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  #1  
Old February 9th 18, 09:01 AM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
pinnerite
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Posts: 104
Default New technologies?

Right now we have a mix of standard definition (SD) and high definition
(HD). Currently marketed are 4K televisions with amazing images.

We can stream 4K from commercial sources provided we are prepared to pay for
the fibre-optic connection and streaming source.

Is that it for broadcast TV or is there currently any research currently
seeking to squeeze more out of the available bands?

(Just contemplating upgrading my ancient Hauppauge SD card. Knowing my luck
it will be obsolete the next day)


--
Mageia 5.1 for x86_64, Kernel:4.4.114-desktop-1.mga5
KDE version 4.14.5 on an AMD Phenom II X4 Black edition.

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  #2  
Old February 9th 18, 11:50 AM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
Andy Burns[_12_]
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Posts: 573
Default New technologies?

Pinnerite wrote:

Right now we have a mix of standard definition (SD) and high definition
(HD). Currently marketed are 4K televisions with amazing images.

We can stream 4K from commercial sources provided we are prepared to pay for
the fibre-optic connection and streaming source.

Is that it for broadcast TV or is there currently any research currently
seeking to squeeze more out of the available bands?


The BBC did a UHD trial (4K) for the previous world cup, including
DVB-T2 transmission borrowing the COM8 muxes from Crystal Palace and
Winter(?) Hill before they were live.

There are a couple of UHD test channels on Astra 28.2E, and presumably
Sky has commercial channels, my DVB-S2 PCIe tuner found them OK

Also (for certain TVs) They tested a 4K stream of Blue Planet 2 on iPlayer.

Given the number of muxes will be shrinking over the next few years as
phones grab more and more spectrum, I suppose it's unlikely there'll be
any terrestrial UHD services ...


http://www.bbc.co.uk/rd/blog/2014-07-how-to-get-uhd-back-from-brazil

http://www.bbc.co.uk/rd/blog/2017-12-uhd-hdr-trial-blue-planet-bbc-iplayer
  #3  
Old February 9th 18, 03:24 PM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
Brian Gaff
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 7,250
Default New technologies?

Is there really a call for this sort of definition outside of very large
screen public use?
Brian

--
----- -
This newsgroup posting comes to you directly from...
The Sofa of Brian Gaff...

Blind user, so no pictures please!
"Andy Burns" wrote in message
...
Pinnerite wrote:

Right now we have a mix of standard definition (SD) and high definition
(HD). Currently marketed are 4K televisions with amazing images.

We can stream 4K from commercial sources provided we are prepared to pay
for
the fibre-optic connection and streaming source.

Is that it for broadcast TV or is there currently any research currently
seeking to squeeze more out of the available bands?


The BBC did a UHD trial (4K) for the previous world cup, including DVB-T2
transmission borrowing the COM8 muxes from Crystal Palace and Winter(?)
Hill before they were live.

There are a couple of UHD test channels on Astra 28.2E, and presumably Sky
has commercial channels, my DVB-S2 PCIe tuner found them OK

Also (for certain TVs) They tested a 4K stream of Blue Planet 2 on
iPlayer.

Given the number of muxes will be shrinking over the next few years as
phones grab more and more spectrum, I suppose it's unlikely there'll be
any terrestrial UHD services ...


http://www.bbc.co.uk/rd/blog/2014-07-how-to-get-uhd-back-from-brazil

http://www.bbc.co.uk/rd/blog/2017-12-uhd-hdr-trial-blue-planet-bbc-iplayer



  #4  
Old February 9th 18, 10:39 PM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
Michael Chare[_5_]
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Posts: 64
Default New technologies?

On 09/02/2018 16:24, Brian Gaff wrote:
Is there really a call for this sort of definition outside of very large
screen public use?
Brian

Yes, even on a 40" screen which was the smallest UHD TV I could buy
about a year ago, the picture does look better. I would like to see more
UHD channels on satellite.

--
Michael Chare
  #5  
Old February 10th 18, 07:49 AM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
Brian Gaff
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Posts: 7,250
Default New technologies?

Hmm, well I guess in my position it all seems a little like snake oil to me
these days.
Brian

--
----- -
This newsgroup posting comes to you directly from...
The Sofa of Brian Gaff...

Blind user, so no pictures please!
"Michael Chare" wrote in message
news
On 09/02/2018 16:24, Brian Gaff wrote:
Is there really a call for this sort of definition outside of very large
screen public use?
Brian

Yes, even on a 40" screen which was the smallest UHD TV I could buy about
a year ago, the picture does look better. I would like to see more UHD
channels on satellite.

--
Michael Chare



  #6  
Old February 10th 18, 08:19 AM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
Jeff Layman[_2_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 723
Default New technologies?

On 09/02/18 23:39, Michael Chare wrote:
On 09/02/2018 16:24, Brian Gaff wrote:
Is there really a call for this sort of definition outside of very large
screen public use?
Brian

Yes, even on a 40" screen which was the smallest UHD TV I could buy
about a year ago, the picture does look better. I would like to see more
UHD channels on satellite.


The problem is that most people don't sit near enough to benefit from a
4K picture. I doubt that many sit close enough to really benefit from HD!

--

Jeff
  #7  
Old February 10th 18, 08:23 AM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
Jeff Layman[_2_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 723
Default New technologies?

On 09/02/18 10:01, Pinnerite wrote:
Right now we have a mix of standard definition (SD) and high definition
(HD). Currently marketed are 4K televisions with amazing images.

We can stream 4K from commercial sources provided we are prepared to pay for
the fibre-optic connection and streaming source.


I have a 10MB wire download and can stream 4K without buffering from
YouTube. Just in case it was not 4K I tried it with the Blue Planet
trial the BBC ran. Same thing - no buffering. So do we really need these
high-speed links, or was I really not viewing 4K both times?

--

Jeff
  #8  
Old February 10th 18, 09:04 AM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
Robin[_8_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 506
Default New technologies?

On 10/02/2018 09:23, Jeff Layman wrote:
On 09/02/18 10:01, Pinnerite wrote:
Right now we have a mix of standard definition (SD) and high definition
(HD). Currently marketed are 4K televisions with amazing images.

We can stream 4K from commercial sources provided we are prepared to
pay for
the fibre-optic connection and streaming source.


I have a 10MB wire download and can stream 4K without buffering from
YouTube. Just in case it was not 4K I tried it with the Blue Planet
trial the BBC ran. Same thing - no buffering. So do we really need these
high-speed links, or was I really not viewing 4K both times?


May I ask if you definitely have 10 Megabytes/s rather than 10
Megabits/s? I ask because connection speeds are usually quoted in
bits/s. And when I trialled Netflix the UHD usually required much more
than 10 Megabits/s. IIRC they recommend a minimum 25. And the
resolution started off low and then increased (much like BBC iPlayer).
So if you are on 10 Megabits/s my answer to your question is a definite
maybe

--
Robin
reply-to address is (intended to be) valid
  #10  
Old February 10th 18, 09:45 AM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
Tweed[_3_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 36
Default New technologies?

Jeff Layman wrote:
On 09/02/18 10:01, Pinnerite wrote:
Right now we have a mix of standard definition (SD) and high definition
(HD). Currently marketed are 4K televisions with amazing images.

We can stream 4K from commercial sources provided we are prepared to pay for
the fibre-optic connection and streaming source.


I have a 10MB wire download and can stream 4K without buffering from
YouTube. Just in case it was not 4K I tried it with the Blue Planet
trial the BBC ran. Same thing - no buffering. So do we really need these
high-speed links, or was I really not viewing 4K both times?


If *all* you are doing at one moment is this, then no. But a household can
have multiple simultaneous demands on their Internet connection. Not all
the time I grant you, but it is useful to have the high speed capacity
available. The other thing with pure fibre delivery is it is a whole lot
more reliable than relying on a bit of twisted pair for the last bit.
Higher upload speeds are also handy, and will become increasingly important
as the use (reliance upon) cloud storage increases. At work I have 1
Gbit/sec up and down to my desktop, and 10 Gbit/sec connecting work to the
outside world. It makes a big difference to what you can do, and I notice
the difference at home, where I’m lucky enough to have 200 down and 12
MBit/sec up. The up link is a bottleneck.

 




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