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Always check the cables.....



 
 
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  #11  
Old January 31st 18, 10:22 AM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
Brian Gaff
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 7,250
Default Always check the cables.....

Yes the centre pin clearance was tiny so a little flexing or looseness and
it was intermittent. I have one here which looks like its all plastic, but
it has this method and in the end I nicked a bit of that blue transparent
film often used inside old fashioned eht transformers shoved down the gap
and its been fine since.
Brian

--
----- -
This newsgroup posting comes to you directly from...
The Sofa of Brian Gaff...

Blind user, so no pictures please!
"Bill Wright" wrote in message
news
On 30/01/2018 21:29, Ian Field wrote:

In the end I examined the aerial lead anyway - the tiny clamp screw for
the inner conductor had worked loose and was shorting to the plug shell.


There was a rash of these about ten years ago. Well, similar anyway. If
there was a 1mm coaxial inner present for the screw to tighten to the
screw head rubbed on the barrel. These plugs caused utter chaos!

Bill



Ads
  #12  
Old January 31st 18, 03:03 PM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
Graham.[_12_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 472
Default Always check the cables.....

Yes the centre pin clearance was tiny so a little flexing or looseness and
it was intermittent. I have one here which looks like its all plastic, but
it has this method and in the end I nicked a bit of that blue transparent
film often used inside old fashioned eht transformers shoved down the gap
and its been fine since.
Brian



Kapton Tape.
--

Graham.
%Profound_observation%
  #13  
Old January 31st 18, 08:16 PM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
Ian Field
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 170
Default Always check the cables.....



"Bill Wright" wrote in message
news
On 30/01/2018 21:29, Ian Field wrote:

In the end I examined the aerial lead anyway - the tiny clamp screw for
the inner conductor had worked loose and was shorting to the plug shell.


There was a rash of these about ten years ago. Well, similar anyway. If
there was a 1mm coaxial inner present for the screw to tighten to the
screw head rubbed on the barrel. These plugs caused utter chaos!


Most dodgy items I repair don't do it again.

Small electrolytics were another plague - where possible, I shoehorned a
foil type in. The rise of multilayer ceramic chip capacitors made the
upgrades easy.

  #14  
Old February 1st 18, 08:30 AM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
Brian Gaff
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 7,250
Default Always check the cables.....

I often wonder why people re invent the wheel in these ways. Nobody is ever
happy with good design, and proven reliability, they have to go back to the
start and in doing so ignore all the lessons of the past.
I'm waiting for a spate of fried smart phones with the sudden popularity of
mains outlets with built in USB connections any day now. There have to be
always on and as such would seem to be at odds with the energy saving ethos
we are all being exposed to yet I see them everywhere, and as they are
obviously based on switch mode psus, which can be easily zapped by mains
spikes, I foresee a lot of trouble down the line.
Of course they do cause interference on radios as well, and one wonders if
perhaps we will next see mains outlets with built in network powerline
adaptors too for networking the computers, telly and all the other bits of
kit like the kettle that suddenly need an internet connection.
sigh.
Brian

--
----- -
This newsgroup posting comes to you directly from...
The Sofa of Brian Gaff...

Blind user, so no pictures please!
"Ian Field" wrote in message
...


"Bill Wright" wrote in message
news
On 30/01/2018 21:29, Ian Field wrote:

In the end I examined the aerial lead anyway - the tiny clamp screw for
the inner conductor had worked loose and was shorting to the plug shell.


There was a rash of these about ten years ago. Well, similar anyway. If
there was a 1mm coaxial inner present for the screw to tighten to the
screw head rubbed on the barrel. These plugs caused utter chaos!


Most dodgy items I repair don't do it again.

Small electrolytics were another plague - where possible, I shoehorned a
foil type in. The rise of multilayer ceramic chip capacitors made the
upgrades easy.



  #15  
Old February 1st 18, 09:10 AM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
Roderick Stewart[_3_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 2,246
Default Always check the cables.....

On Thu, 1 Feb 2018 09:30:52 -0000, "Brian Gaff"
wrote:

I'm waiting for a spate of fried smart phones with the sudden popularity of
mains outlets with built in USB connections any day now.


Hardly worth the bother anyway if your phone can do quick charging, as
these wall sockets will almost certainly just be bog standard 5V
outlets with a current capability of 0.5A, or maybe 1A at the most, so
no advantage over using a proper charger, and probably worse.

It appears there are two different methods of quick charging phones,
so it will only work if you get the correct one for your phone,
otherwise it will only work like an ordinary slow charger.

The Qualcom Quickcharge ones start off at 5V, then after a few seconds
if they detect a suitable phone will raise the voltage, in theory up
to 20V, though with my Samsung phone I've only seen about 9V, so it
probably depends on the device.

The iQ system favoured by Apple holds the voltage constant at 5V, and
allows the phone to draw more current, up to about 2.5A I think,
though I haven't got a suitalbe Apple phone to test this.

Some chargers claim to be "dual-standard" in that they can cope with
both systems, so they must have a means of detecting which brand of
phone or tablet you plug in, but I'd be surprised if any of the ones
built into 13A sockets are as clever as this. Best avoided IMHO.

Rod.
  #16  
Old February 1st 18, 10:06 AM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
Brian Gaff
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 7,250
Default Always check the cables.....

Well sadly that seems not to be being heeded. Just waiting for one to burst
into flames or something. could be the next thing for watchdog.

This wireless charging is also a joke. the current system looks to me like a
high frequency power oscillator connected to a coil with a resonant coil in
the device, which has to be with a thin insulated back and be placed exactly
in the right spot to charge up. This looks wasteful once again. Really, what
is the point?
Brian

--
----- -
This newsgroup posting comes to you directly from...
The Sofa of Brian Gaff...

Blind user, so no pictures please!
"Roderick Stewart" wrote in message
...
On Thu, 1 Feb 2018 09:30:52 -0000, "Brian Gaff"
wrote:

I'm waiting for a spate of fried smart phones with the sudden popularity
of
mains outlets with built in USB connections any day now.


Hardly worth the bother anyway if your phone can do quick charging, as
these wall sockets will almost certainly just be bog standard 5V
outlets with a current capability of 0.5A, or maybe 1A at the most, so
no advantage over using a proper charger, and probably worse.

It appears there are two different methods of quick charging phones,
so it will only work if you get the correct one for your phone,
otherwise it will only work like an ordinary slow charger.

The Qualcom Quickcharge ones start off at 5V, then after a few seconds
if they detect a suitable phone will raise the voltage, in theory up
to 20V, though with my Samsung phone I've only seen about 9V, so it
probably depends on the device.

The iQ system favoured by Apple holds the voltage constant at 5V, and
allows the phone to draw more current, up to about 2.5A I think,
though I haven't got a suitalbe Apple phone to test this.

Some chargers claim to be "dual-standard" in that they can cope with
both systems, so they must have a means of detecting which brand of
phone or tablet you plug in, but I'd be surprised if any of the ones
built into 13A sockets are as clever as this. Best avoided IMHO.

Rod.



  #17  
Old February 1st 18, 11:31 AM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
Chris Green
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 178
Default Always check the cables.....

Roderick Stewart wrote:
On Thu, 1 Feb 2018 09:30:52 -0000, "Brian Gaff"
wrote:

I'm waiting for a spate of fried smart phones with the sudden popularity of
mains outlets with built in USB connections any day now.


Hardly worth the bother anyway if your phone can do quick charging, as
these wall sockets will almost certainly just be bog standard 5V
outlets with a current capability of 0.5A, or maybe 1A at the most, so
no advantage over using a proper charger, and probably worse.

No, there are lots that can do 2.1A and I've seen higher outputs on
some.

--
Chris Green
·
  #18  
Old February 1st 18, 04:00 PM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
charles[_2_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 699
Default Always check the cables.....

In article , Brian Gaff
wrote:
Well sadly that seems not to be being heeded. Just waiting for one to
burst into flames or something. could be the next thing for watchdog.


This wireless charging is also a joke. the current system looks to me
like a high frequency power oscillator connected to a coil with a
resonant coil in the device, which has to be with a thin insulated back
and be placed exactly in the right spot to charge up. This looks wasteful
once again. Really, what is the point? Brian


saves the real probability of damaging the socket or pcb on the phone by
contant plugging/unplugging. I had one for my previous phone, a Nokia,
worked well and didn't need very accurate placing.

--
from KT24 in Surrey, England
  #19  
Old February 1st 18, 07:22 PM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
Ian Field
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 170
Default Always check the cables.....



"Brian Gaff" wrote in message
news
I often wonder why people re invent the wheel in these ways. Nobody is
ever happy with good design, and proven reliability, they have to go back
to the start and in doing so ignore all the lessons of the past.
I'm waiting for a spate of fried smart phones with the sudden popularity
of mains outlets with built in USB connections any day now. There have to
be always on and as such would seem to be at odds with the energy saving
ethos we are all being exposed to yet I see them everywhere, and as they
are obviously based on switch mode psus, which can be easily zapped by
mains spikes, I foresee a lot of trouble down the line.
Of course they do cause interference on radios as well, and one wonders if
perhaps we will next see mains outlets with built in network powerline
adaptors too for networking the computers, telly and all the other bits
of kit like the kettle that suddenly need an internet connection.


There's already such thing as IoT dildos.

  #20  
Old February 1st 18, 07:23 PM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
Ian Field
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 170
Default Always check the cables.....



"Roderick Stewart" wrote in message
...
On Thu, 1 Feb 2018 09:30:52 -0000, "Brian Gaff"
wrote:

I'm waiting for a spate of fried smart phones with the sudden popularity
of
mains outlets with built in USB connections any day now.


Hardly worth the bother anyway if your phone can do quick charging, as
these wall sockets will almost certainly just be bog standard 5V
outlets with a current capability of 0.5A, or maybe 1A at the most, so
no advantage over using a proper charger, and probably worse.


2.1A USB wall warts are fairly common.

 




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