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Freeview swizzling sound tracks



 
 
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  #21  
Old January 30th 18, 09:42 AM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
Unsteadyken
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Posts: 11
Default Freeview swizzling sound tracks

In article ,
says...
some people seem
to be shooting themselves in the foot by using powerline internet networking

Awful things. I was asked to sort out a couple of things in a chums
flat. The BT home hub was at one end of the sofa, the youview box at the
other and the BT engineer had used powerlines to connect them. Less than
5 bloody feet! Both were much too hot to touch comfortably, what a waste
of electricity.
Ads
  #22  
Old January 30th 18, 10:24 AM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
Max Demian
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Posts: 3,970
Default Freeview swizzling sound tracks

On 30/01/2018 07:08, Roderick Stewart wrote:
On Mon, 29 Jan 2018 19:26:08 GMT, Johnny B Good
wrote:

Can I assume that you are referring to commercially pressed CDs which,
when played on another CD player, *doesn't* duck the sound at the track
boundaries[...]?


I think that is what he's referring to, and I can confirm I've
observed the same effect.

A typical pop album will be a collection of separate songs with brief
pauses between them, and a great many classical works will also be
divided into different "movements", usually intended to be played with
pauses between them, but occasionally not. Even when movements of a
symphony or concerto are played without breaks, as their composers
intended, it's usual for CD recordings to include the same metadata
markers as for separate tracks, and when a player handles this
correctly you will see the indicated track number change but without
hearing any interruption to the music.


I think "index markers" (subdivisions of a track) were originally
intended to be used to mark movements, so the track markers could be
used for multiple works on the same CD.

The first CD player I bought (in 1987) supported indexes, but I've never
seen a CD that used them, and manufacturers stopped making players with
them.

Even the Wikipedia entry doesn't mention them:
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Compact_disc#Audio_CD

--
Max Demian
  #23  
Old January 30th 18, 11:08 AM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
Jim Lesurf[_2_]
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Posts: 4,326
Default Freeview swizzling sound tracks

In article , Max
Demian
wrote:

I think "index markers" (subdivisions of a track) were originally
intended to be used to mark movements, so the track markers could be
used for multiple works on the same CD.


The first CD player I bought (in 1987) supported indexes, but I've never
seen a CD that used them, and manufacturers stopped making players with
them.


I have a few Audio CDs that have 'index' points. Alas, as you say, most
players don't detect these. Usually this doesn't matter. But it is
irritating for one CD I have - early Japanese CD of "Wish you where here"
which uses index points *instead* of tracks.

It is part of the spec for a Red Book CD to include an indication in the
data stream for two seconds before a track start. This was meant to aid the
player locate the track and have a 'run up' before unmuting to play a
selected track. *Not* to add breaks. But as time has passed and the
requirement to pay Philips/Sony lapsed, I guess some makers get careless.

There is meant to be a similar 'run up' section at the start of the data on
the disc. And I recall that some discs omitted this. e.g. I recall an early
CD of "Sheherazade" which my first CD player tended to unmute just *after*
the music began if started from a static disc. To deal with it I had to
start play, then quickly press pause and play again. By then the disc was
spinning and the head was near to being where it needed to be to track and
focus and thus unmute.

No later players have showed the problem with the same disc. The hardware
was more nimble. :-)

Jim

--
Please use the address on the audiomisc page if you wish to email me.
Electronics https://www.st-andrews.ac.uk/~www_pa...o/electron.htm
biog http://jcgl.orpheusweb.co.uk/history/ups_and_downs.html
Audio Misc http://www.audiomisc.co.uk/index.html

  #24  
Old January 30th 18, 02:00 PM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
Indy Jess John
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Posts: 1,307
Default Freeview swizzling sound tracks

On 30/01/2018 01:13, Johnny B Good wrote:

two seconds of silence (this was the case with, air, Nero5 - it
might be a little different with other CD Burning software)


I use Nero7. It has a yes/no tick box on the Burn Audio CD screen,
where I can choose whether or not I want the silence.

Jim
  #25  
Old January 30th 18, 02:09 PM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
JNugent[_4_]
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Posts: 241
Default Freeview swizzling sound tracks

On 29/01/2018 20:00, Brian Gaff wrote:

Nobody interested in commenting on the original point then.
Its about time also that tv makers put decent speakers in their sets.
brian


I have a 40" Bravia whose sound is acceptable, but the lower part of the
frame is wide enough to house reasonable speakers. The updated smart TV
Bravia, with a very narrow "picture-frame" surround, sounded like a
tin-can until I got a Denon soundbar.

The world has moved on. The visual aesthetics of modern TVs no longer
allow forward facing speakers. Rear-facing speakers would not sound good
(and the stereo effect would be compromised). The soundbar (or the
connection into a hi-fi ststem) looks as though it's here to stay.



  #26  
Old January 30th 18, 05:09 PM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
Paul Ratcliffe
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Posts: 2,486
Default Freeview swizzling sound tracks

On Mon, 29 Jan 2018 19:26:08 GMT, Johnny B Good
wrote:

It's been well over a decade since I last burnt any audio CDs but I do
remember the problem I had creating CDs from ripped tape and vinyl where
the audio CD burning software (Nero5 in my case) kept introducing
unwanted two second gaps between the seperate tracks very much against my
wishes.


That's why anyone who wanted total control used to use something like
Cdrecord and write the cuesheets themselves. I certainly did.
  #27  
Old January 30th 18, 05:58 PM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
Max Demian
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Posts: 3,970
Default Freeview swizzling sound tracks

On 30/01/2018 15:09, JNugent wrote:
On 29/01/2018 20:00, Brian Gaff wrote:

Nobody interested in commenting on the original point then.
* Its about time also that tv makers put decent speakers in their sets.
* brian


I have a 40" Bravia whose sound is acceptable, but the lower part of the
frame is wide enough to house reasonable speakers. The updated smart TV
Bravia, with a very narrow "picture-frame" surround, sounded like a
tin-can until I got a Denon soundbar.

The world has moved on. The visual aesthetics of modern TVs no longer
allow forward facing speakers. Rear-facing speakers would not sound good
(and the stereo effect would be compromised). The soundbar (or the
connection into a hi-fi ststem) looks as though it's here to stay.


A soundbar-like device could be part of the installation that the TV
slots into instead of a table stand. Why should we have to pay extra for
decent sound?

--
Max Demian
  #28  
Old January 30th 18, 06:25 PM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
JNugent[_4_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 241
Default Freeview swizzling sound tracks

On 30/01/2018 11:24, Max Demian wrote:
On 30/01/2018 07:08, Roderick Stewart wrote:
On Mon, 29 Jan 2018 19:26:08 GMT, Johnny B Good
wrote:

Can I assume that you are referring to commercially pressed CDs which,
when played on another CD player, *doesn't* duck the sound at the track
boundaries[...]?


I think that is what he's referring to, and I can confirm I've
observed the same effect.

A typical pop album will be a collection of separate songs with brief
pauses between them, and a great many classical works will also be
divided into different "movements", usually intended to be played with
pauses between them, but occasionally not. Even when movements of a
symphony or concerto are played without breaks, as their composers
intended, it's usual for CD recordings to include the same metadata
markers as for separate tracks, and when a player handles this
correctly you will see the indicated track number change but without
hearing any interruption to the music.


I think "index markers" (subdivisions of a track) were originally
intended to be used to mark movements, so the track markers could be
used for multiple works on the same CD.

The first CD player I bought (in 1987) supported indexes, but I've never
seen a CD that used them, and manufacturers stopped making players with
them.

Even the Wikipedia entry doesn't mention them:
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Compact_disc#Audio_CD


I have one CD which has subordinate track markers within a track
(indicated in the format, eg, 1:1, 1:2) - but I can't remember which one
it is.
 




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