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uk.tech.digital-tv (Digital TV - General) (uk.tech.digital-tv) Discussion of all matters technical in origin related to the reception of digital television transmissions, be they via satellite, terrestrial or cable. Advertising is forbidden, with no exceptions.

Aerial cables (other than the goat aspect)



 
 
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  #1  
Old January 20th 18, 03:36 PM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
Bill Wright[_3_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 2,448
Default Aerial cables (other than the goat aspect)

In the fifties and sixties people often had the wireless next to the
telly. In fact usually the wireless had been in place for many years,
and so when they got a telly they naturally put it adjacent. Often when
we installed the telly we'd notice that the wireless aerial was notheing
more than a bit of wire staples up a door frame and along the picture
rail. Standard practice (as a good turn for the customer) was to connect
a short bit of single core wire to the sheath of the new TV aerial coax
and connect it to the wireless. This usually gave a dramatic improvement
in wireless reception.

Bill
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  #2  
Old January 20th 18, 05:38 PM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
Graham.[_12_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 472
Default Aerial cables (other than the goat aspect)

In the fifties and sixties people often had the wireless next to the
telly. In fact usually the wireless had been in place for many years,
and so when they got a telly they naturally put it adjacent. Often when
we installed the telly we'd notice that the wireless aerial was notheing
more than a bit of wire staples up a door frame and along the picture
rail. Standard practice (as a good turn for the customer) was to connect
a short bit of single core wire to the sheath of the new TV aerial coax
and connect it to the wireless. This usually gave a dramatic improvement
in wireless reception.

Bill



I can announce some Good News for people who like to listen to the
Home Service with their wireless set on top of their television.

As we all undoubtedly know, this traditionally was plagued by a
deafening 2.5Khz whistle or heterodyne caused by the 20th harmonic of
the 405 line horizontal sweep, beating with the Droitwich carrier
thus:

10.125Khz*20 = 202.5

202.5-200 = 2.5Khz

The Good News is since Feb 1st 1988 and the change to 198Khz the
situation is most improved, now the lowest whistle is 4.5Khz

10.125Khz*20 = 202.5

202.5-198 = 4.5Khz

"But", I hear you say, "That's three years after the cessation of the
405 line service"

That's not my fault is it? The point is we could have enjoyed thirty
years of whistle-free reception had we kept it going, and to celabrate
I give you this:

https://youtu.be/LrfjJvG430A
--

Graham.
%Profound_observation%
  #3  
Old January 20th 18, 06:33 PM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
Max Demian
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 3,970
Default Aerial cables (other than the goat aspect)

On 20/01/2018 18:38, Graham. wrote:

I can announce some Good News for people who like to listen to the
Home Service with their wireless set on top of their television.

As we all undoubtedly know, this traditionally was plagued by a
deafening 2.5Khz whistle or heterodyne caused by the 20th harmonic of
the 405 line horizontal sweep, beating with the Droitwich carrier
thus:

10.125Khz*20 = 202.5

202.5-200 = 2.5Khz

The Good News is since Feb 1st 1988 and the change to 198Khz the
situation is most improved, now the lowest whistle is 4.5Khz

10.125Khz*20 = 202.5

202.5-198 = 4.5Khz

"But", I hear you say, "That's three years after the cessation of the
405 line service"

That's not my fault is it? The point is we could have enjoyed thirty
years of whistle-free reception had we kept it going, and to celabrate
I give you this:

https://youtu.be/LrfjJvG430A


I remember the interference to the Droitwich 200 kHz signal - actually
Light Programme, not Home Service - and we didn't have a TV in the
house, and the nearest house with TV was fifty yards away.

It was mains borne interference, and I cured it with a capacitor across
the mains transformer secondary winding - until the cap fused and
destroyed the transformer; fortunately I had a replacement.

How is 4.5 kHz any better than 2.5? I think I can still hear 4.5 even now.

--
Max Demian
  #4  
Old January 20th 18, 09:18 PM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
Graham.[_12_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 472
Default Aerial cables (other than the goat aspect)


https://youtu.be/LrfjJvG430A


I remember the interference to the Droitwich 200 kHz signal - actually
Light Programme, not Home Service - and we didn't have a TV in the
house, and the nearest house with TV was fifty yards away.

It was mains borne interference, and I cured it with a capacitor across
the mains transformer secondary winding - until the cap fused and
destroyed the transformer; fortunately I had a replacement.

How is 4.5 kHz any better than 2.5? I think I can still hear 4.5 even now.


Well both network names had become numerical (if not digital) by the
time in question. Longwave carried Radio 4 and dropped Radio 2 from
23rd November 1978.

In theory the recivers passband should sharply roll off at 9Khz (it
dosn't of course) just as the transmitter has a 9Khz roofing filter
gving rise to a maximum posible audio frequency of half of that,
4.5Khz

Yes, you can hear it on the video, but trust me, it was subjectivly
worse when R4 was on 200Khz back then.
--

Graham.
%Profound_observation%
  #5  
Old January 21st 18, 07:17 AM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
Brian Gaff
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 7,250
Default Aerial cables (other than the goat aspect)

Yes that was what I was talking about, but sadly the problem occurred that
if one put the tv on the whole of the bands were full of buzzes and
whistles. You really needed the radio aerial a long way away from the tv.

Of course my father and I being in the TV trade tended to have tvs in
various states of nudity, and this did not do much for interference levels
either.
Brian

--
----- -
This newsgroup posting comes to you directly from...
The Sofa of Brian Gaff...

Blind user, so no pictures please!
"Bill Wright" wrote in message
news
In the fifties and sixties people often had the wireless next to the
telly. In fact usually the wireless had been in place for many years, and
so when they got a telly they naturally put it adjacent. Often when we
installed the telly we'd notice that the wireless aerial was notheing more
than a bit of wire staples up a door frame and along the picture rail.
Standard practice (as a good turn for the customer) was to connect a short
bit of single core wire to the sheath of the new TV aerial coax and
connect it to the wireless. This usually gave a dramatic improvement in
wireless reception.

Bill



  #6  
Old January 21st 18, 07:23 AM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
Brian Gaff
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 7,250
Default Aerial cables (other than the goat aspect)

Yes but since not many sets now actually generate scans any more, the
problem now is one of digital noise instead, not to mention switch mode
power supplies with very poor filtering.

Talking of long wave somebody has managed to put a station other than the
RTE one on 252Khz, making listening to the Hurling very bad apparently. She
is Irish of course. I suggested she should get with the program and get the
internet.
Brian

--
----- -
This newsgroup posting comes to you directly from...
The Sofa of Brian Gaff...

Blind user, so no pictures please!
"Max Demian" wrote in message
o.uk...
On 20/01/2018 18:38, Graham. wrote:

I can announce some Good News for people who like to listen to the
Home Service with their wireless set on top of their television.

As we all undoubtedly know, this traditionally was plagued by a
deafening 2.5Khz whistle or heterodyne caused by the 20th harmonic of
the 405 line horizontal sweep, beating with the Droitwich carrier
thus:

10.125Khz*20 = 202.5

202.5-200 = 2.5Khz

The Good News is since Feb 1st 1988 and the change to 198Khz the
situation is most improved, now the lowest whistle is 4.5Khz

10.125Khz*20 = 202.5

202.5-198 = 4.5Khz

"But", I hear you say, "That's three years after the cessation of the
405 line service"

That's not my fault is it? The point is we could have enjoyed thirty
years of whistle-free reception had we kept it going, and to celabrate
I give you this:

https://youtu.be/LrfjJvG430A

I remember the interference to the Droitwich 200 kHz signal - actually
Light Programme, not Home Service - and we didn't have a TV in the house,
and the nearest house with TV was fifty yards away.

It was mains borne interference, and I cured it with a capacitor across
the mains transformer secondary winding - until the cap fused and
destroyed the transformer; fortunately I had a replacement.

How is 4.5 kHz any better than 2.5? I think I can still hear 4.5 even now.

--
Max Demian



  #7  
Old January 21st 18, 02:11 PM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
Graham.[_12_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 472
Default Aerial cables (other than the goat aspect)

Yes but since not many sets now actually generate scans any more, the
problem now is one of digital noise instead, not to mention switch mode
power supplies with very poor filtering.


Brian my post was supposed to be academic, in the sense of having
little practical use.

I should perhaps explain that the video I shot and posted in responce
to Bills OP shows a working 405 line TV on my desk showing Test Card
C, and what you can hear is a modern radio sat on top tuned to 198kHz

https://youtu.be/LrfjJvG430A
--

Graham.
%Profound_observation%
  #8  
Old January 22nd 18, 03:52 PM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
MR
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 31
Default Aerial cables (other than the goat aspect)

On Saturday, 20 January 2018 16:36:08 UTC, wrote:
In the fifties and sixties people often had the wireless next to the
telly. In fact usually the wireless had been in place for many years,
and so when they got a telly they naturally put it adjacent. Often when
we installed the telly we'd notice that the wireless aerial was notheing
more than a bit of wire staples up a door frame and along the picture
rail. Standard practice (as a good turn for the customer) was to connect
a short bit of single core wire to the sheath of the new TV aerial coax
and connect it to the wireless. This usually gave a dramatic improvement
in wireless reception.

Bill


I used my iron bedstead as an aerial on my crystal set, used to work fine.

  #9  
Old January 22nd 18, 08:30 PM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
Bill Wright[_3_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 2,448
Default Aerial cables (other than the goat aspect)

On 22/01/2018 16:52, MR wrote:
On Saturday, 20 January 2018 16:36:08 UTC, wrote:
In the fifties and sixties people often had the wireless next to the
telly. In fact usually the wireless had been in place for many years,
and so when they got a telly they naturally put it adjacent. Often when
we installed the telly we'd notice that the wireless aerial was notheing
more than a bit of wire staples up a door frame and along the picture
rail. Standard practice (as a good turn for the customer) was to connect
a short bit of single core wire to the sheath of the new TV aerial coax
and connect it to the wireless. This usually gave a dramatic improvement
in wireless reception.

Bill


I used my iron bedstead as an aerial on my crystal set, used to work fine.


When I was a labourer on the roads I sometimes got the Stop-Go sign job.
I used to set up near a bridge when I could so I could connect my radio
to the steel rail, so I could hear Caroline South.
I had several turns of wire around the portable radio in the correct
orientation to transfer signal to the ferrite aerial.

Bill
  #10  
Old January 24th 18, 12:41 AM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
Graham.[_12_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 472
Default Aerial cables (other than the goat aspect)

On 22/01/2018 16:52, MR wrote:
On Saturday, 20 January 2018 16:36:08 UTC, wrote:
In the fifties and sixties people often had the wireless next to the
telly. In fact usually the wireless had been in place for many years,
and so when they got a telly they naturally put it adjacent. Often when
we installed the telly we'd notice that the wireless aerial was notheing
more than a bit of wire staples up a door frame and along the picture
rail. Standard practice (as a good turn for the customer) was to connect
a short bit of single core wire to the sheath of the new TV aerial coax
and connect it to the wireless. This usually gave a dramatic improvement
in wireless reception.

Bill


I used my iron bedstead as an aerial on my crystal set, used to work fine.


When I was a labourer on the roads I sometimes got the Stop-Go sign job.
I used to set up near a bridge when I could so I could connect my radio
to the steel rail, so I could hear Caroline South.
I had several turns of wire around the portable radio in the correct
orientation to transfer signal to the ferrite aerial.

Bill


When I was a kid I lived near the Manchester & Bury railway line (now
part of Metrolink). The station approach to the local station formed a
shortcut to the main road, and there was a wire fence ether side, the
kind with galvanised wire and ratchet tentioners at intervals. Me and
my friend attached our crystal set aerial to the wire with a croc-clip
to see if we could pick up anything, the station-master came running
up to us convinced we were electrifying the fence.


--

Graham.
%Profound_observation%
 




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