A Sky, cable and digital tv forum. Digital TV Banter

If this is your first visit, be sure to check out the FAQ by clicking the link above. You may have to register before you can post: click the register link above to proceed. To start viewing messages, select the forum that you want to visit from the selection below.

Go Back   Home » Digital TV Banter forum » Digital TV Newsgroups » uk.tech.digital-tv (Digital TV - General)
Site Map Home Register Authors List Search Today's Posts Mark Forums Read Web Partners

uk.tech.digital-tv (Digital TV - General) (uk.tech.digital-tv) Discussion of all matters technical in origin related to the reception of digital television transmissions, be they via satellite, terrestrial or cable. Advertising is forbidden, with no exceptions.

BBC Scotland - scope for confusion?



 
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
  #41  
Old December 14th 17, 08:33 PM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
Andy Burns[_12_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 573
Default BBC Scotland - scope for confusion?

Woody wrote:

Don't think the term mi-fi is being correctly applied here - or have I
missed summat?


You're quite right, I blame being semi-awake at stupid o'clock.
Ads
  #42  
Old December 15th 17, 09:34 AM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
Roderick Stewart[_3_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 2,246
Default BBC Scotland - scope for confusion?

On Thu, 14 Dec 2017 20:33:48 +0000, Andy Burns
wrote:

Don't think the term mi-fi is being correctly applied here - or have I
missed summat?


You're quite right, I blame being semi-awake at stupid o'clock.


How did wireless get to be called "wi-fi" anyway? Can anybody explain?

Once upon a time it was called wireless, or wireless telegraphy, then
when I was young it was called radio, then after the personal computer
was invented and we started using it for connecting them, it was
called wireless again, and then for some reason completely unclear to
me, it seems to have subsequently acquired the term "wi-fi".

The only similar term I can think of is "hi-fi", which I understand is
derived from "high fidelity", which makes sense, but unless I'm
missing something vital, "wi-fi" makes none at all.

Rod.
  #43  
Old December 15th 17, 10:23 AM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
Andy Burns[_12_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 573
Default BBC Scotland - scope for confusion?

Roderick Stewart wrote:

How did wireless get to be called "wi-fi" anyway? Can anybody explain?


Obviously it's the IEEE that creates the wireless ethernet standards via
its 802.11 committee, in the bad old days interoperability between
different manufacturers wasn't all it should be, so they formed the WECA
as a manufacturers alliance, presumably having something that's
pronounced like "weaker' is bad for business, so it renamed itself to
something trendier sounding, I suppose "WiFi" as a brand isn't a bad
name, and is eminently [TM]able.

  #44  
Old December 15th 17, 10:33 AM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
Roderick Stewart[_3_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 2,246
Default BBC Scotland - scope for confusion?

On Fri, 15 Dec 2017 10:23:22 +0000, Andy Burns
wrote:

How did wireless get to be called "wi-fi" anyway? Can anybody explain?


Obviously it's the IEEE that creates the wireless ethernet standards via
its 802.11 committee, in the bad old days interoperability between
different manufacturers wasn't all it should be, so they formed the WECA
as a manufacturers alliance, presumably having something that's
pronounced like "weaker' is bad for business, so it renamed itself to
something trendier sounding, I suppose "WiFi" as a brand isn't a bad
name, and is eminently [TM]able.


Yes, I can see the value of having a universally recognised term
that's unlikely to be confused with anything else. It's just the
etymology that baffles me. If it really was invented by branding
consultants, I daresay it makes sense, or as much sense as anything
else they come up with.

The pronunciation isn't universal though. Most English speakers
pronounce it like "wyefye", but some, particularly foreigners, seem to
favour something like "wiffi". Still, at least we know what they mean.

Rod.
  #45  
Old December 15th 17, 02:00 PM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
Indy Jess John
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 1,307
Default BBC Scotland - scope for confusion?

On 15/12/2017 09:34, Roderick Stewart wrote:

How did wireless get to be called "wi-fi" anyway? Can anybody explain?

Apparently it was thought of as a pun on hi-fi.
This documents refers to it as Wireless Fidelity
https://www.ieee.org/about/technolog...rging/wifi.pdf

Jim

  #46  
Old December 15th 17, 02:11 PM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
Max Demian
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 3,970
Default BBC Scotland - scope for confusion?

On 15/12/2017 10:33, Roderick Stewart wrote:
On Fri, 15 Dec 2017 10:23:22 +0000, Andy Burns
wrote:

How did wireless get to be called "wi-fi" anyway? Can anybody explain?


Obviously it's the IEEE that creates the wireless ethernet standards via
its 802.11 committee, in the bad old days interoperability between
different manufacturers wasn't all it should be, so they formed the WECA
as a manufacturers alliance, presumably having something that's
pronounced like "weaker' is bad for business, so it renamed itself to
something trendier sounding, I suppose "WiFi" as a brand isn't a bad
name, and is eminently [TM]able.


Yes, I can see the value of having a universally recognised term
that's unlikely to be confused with anything else. It's just the
etymology that baffles me. If it really was invented by branding
consultants, I daresay it makes sense, or as much sense as anything
else they come up with.


No worse than naming a communication protocol after a tenth century
Danish king with a logo the runic representation of his initials.

--
Max Demian
  #47  
Old December 15th 17, 03:50 PM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
Roderick Stewart[_3_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 2,246
Default BBC Scotland - scope for confusion?

On Fri, 15 Dec 2017 14:00:42 +0000, Indy Jess John
wrote:

How did wireless get to be called "wi-fi" anyway? Can anybody explain?

Apparently it was thought of as a pun on hi-fi.
This documents refers to it as Wireless Fidelity
https://www.ieee.org/about/technolog...rging/wifi.pdf

Jim


Well, I guess you can learn something every day. If that's the history
of the terminology then that's its history, but it still makes no
sense. What on earth has "fidelity" got to do with wireless
networking. My understanding of "high fidelity" is that it refers to
audio signals or equipment where the fidelity, or "faithfulness" to
the original sound is better than that of any old bog-standard sound
system, which is what makes it deserving of this special term.

But what's more faithful about something called "wireless fidelity",
and more faithful than what anyway? As far as I can see wireless
computer connections don't have anything to do with high quality
sound just because the words rhyme.

Rod.
 




Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

vB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Forum Jump


All times are GMT. The time now is 07:59 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.6.4
Copyright ©2000 - 2018, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.SEO by vBSEO 2.4.0
Copyright 2004-2018 Digital TV Banter.
The comments are property of their posters.