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How does closing BBC Three save any money?



 
 
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  #1  
Old September 27th 15, 11:37 AM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
Scott[_2_]
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Posts: 1,344
Default How does closing BBC Three save any money?

I see the 'closure' of BBC Three has not been postponed until after
Christmas. I still don't see how this move will save any money at
all. If BBC Three continues on-line then the production costs are
still there. The multiplex is still there, apparently with BBC One+1
so so savings in transmission costs. Is it maybe that rights cost
less if the audience is smaller?

On a related theme, is BBC One+1 still going ahead? I thought Ofcom
thought it was unfair competition?
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  #2  
Old September 27th 15, 12:36 PM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
NY
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Posts: 1,329
Default How does closing BBC Three save any money?

"Scott" wrote in message
...
I see the 'closure' of BBC Three has not been postponed until after
Christmas. I still don't see how this move will save any money at
all. If BBC Three continues on-line then the production costs are
still there. The multiplex is still there, apparently with BBC One+1
so so savings in transmission costs. Is it maybe that rights cost
less if the audience is smaller?

On a related theme, is BBC One+1 still going ahead? I thought Ofcom
thought it was unfair competition?


How can Ofcom quibble about BBC One+1 when they allow ITV1+1, ITV3+1 etc?

Is the BBC Three HD slot on BBC B going to BBC One HD+1 as well? Or will
they bring BBC Four HD into BBC B so you don't need to be able to get Com7
to receive this channel? It seems odd that BBC B also carries ITV and
Channel 4 (non BBC) whereas Com7 carries BBC Four HD and BBC News HD - not a
very clear BBC vs non-BBC (Commercial) demarcation!

I wonder what other channels will go on Com8 -
http://www.digitaluk.co.uk/industry/...annel_listings only shows QVC
Beauty HD and QVC+1 HD, so there's loads of space capacity - probably for
similar dross :-(

  #3  
Old September 27th 15, 03:57 PM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
John Hall[_2_]
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Posts: 265
Default How does closing BBC Three save any money?

In message , Scott
writes
I see the 'closure' of BBC Three has not been postponed until after
Christmas.


Guessing that "not" should be "now".

It's been noticeable over recent months how one or two of the most
popular BBC Three programmes, such as "Family Guy", have started turning
up on BBC 1.

I still don't see how this move will save any money at
all. If BBC Three continues on-line then the production costs are
still there. The multiplex is still there, apparently with BBC One+1
so so savings in transmission costs. Is it maybe that rights cost
less if the audience is smaller?

On a related theme, is BBC One+1 still going ahead? I thought Ofcom
thought it was unfair competition?


How could they say that, when just about every non-BBC channel has a +1
option?
--
John Hall
"Honest criticism is hard to take,
particularly from a relative, a friend,
an acquaintance, or a stranger." Franklin P Jones
  #4  
Old September 27th 15, 04:30 PM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
Scott[_2_]
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Posts: 1,344
Default How does closing BBC Three save any money?

On Sun, 27 Sep 2015 16:57:44 +0100, John Hall
wrote:

In message , Scott
writes
I see the 'closure' of BBC Three has not been postponed until after
Christmas.


Guessing that "not" should be "now".


Yes, for some reason I keep making that mistake!

It's been noticeable over recent months how one or two of the most
popular BBC Three programmes, such as "Family Guy", have started turning
up on BBC 1.

I still don't see how this move will save any money at
all. If BBC Three continues on-line then the production costs are
still there. The multiplex is still there, apparently with BBC One+1
so so savings in transmission costs. Is it maybe that rights cost
less if the audience is smaller?

On a related theme, is BBC One+1 still going ahead? I thought Ofcom
thought it was unfair competition?


How could they say that, when just about every non-BBC channel has a +1
option?


http://www.radiotimes.com/news/2015-...posal-rejected
  #5  
Old September 27th 15, 04:58 PM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
Peter Duncanson
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Posts: 4,272
Default How does closing BBC Three save any money?

On Sun, 27 Sep 2015 12:37:56 +0100, Scott
wrote:

I see the 'closure' of BBC Three has not been postponed until after
Christmas. I still don't see how this move will save any money at
all. If BBC Three continues on-line then the production costs are
still there. The multiplex is still there, apparently with BBC One+1
so so savings in transmission costs. Is it maybe that rights cost
less if the audience is smaller?


I can't point to anything authoritative, but the impression I got when
this was first announced was that only some BBC Three programs would
continue and they be available on-demand online. It would be BBC Three
"Lite" providing the equivalent of 1, 2 or maybe 3 hours a day.


--
Peter Duncanson
(in uk.tech.digital-tv)
  #6  
Old September 27th 15, 10:45 PM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
Johnny B Good[_2_]
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Posts: 513
Default How does closing BBC Three save any money?

On Sun, 27 Sep 2015 16:57:44 +0100, John Hall wrote:

In message , Scott
writes
I see the 'closure' of BBC Three has not been postponed until after
Christmas.


Guessing that "not" should be "now".

It's been noticeable over recent months how one or two of the most
popular BBC Three programmes, such as "Family Guy", have started turning
up on BBC 1.

Correction, BBC TWO. Also (checking recording dates) they've been
broadcasting episodes of FG on BBC2 since at least the 5th of July of
this year (I'm not sure I managed to capture the very first episodes of
this latest BBC2 series of FG).

So far I have a total of 33 episodes (from three different series)
tucked away on the NAS box with the last of tonight's trio of episodes
just about to finish airing which I'll top and tail and re-title before
moving them to the NAS box later on tonight.

Getting back to the business of the BBC ditching their BBC Three (now)
waste of bandwidth 'experiment gone wrong' channel (it was once a useful
platform for refreshingly funny comedy series in its early years), its
final demise on this 'platform' can't come soon enough afaiac.

The last BBC3 programmes I programmed into the recording schedule were
"Murder in Successville" and "Nick Helm's Heavy Entertainment" which both
finished airing in mid June this year. My bothering to record these
programmes at all was motivated more from the "Car Crash in Slow Motion"
factor than due to any comedic content.

In fact, a week or two after these shows finished, I stopped wasting
time even checking out the EPG for any more BBC3 'content'. As far as I'm
concerned BBC3 is already dead. That its corpse is still twitching is
merely on account of the BBC's endeavour to keep it on 'Life Support' way
beyond its BB date.

Perhaps their experiment is only a few short months away from completing
yet another full year of operational service and they have a desire that
the plug is pulled at exactly its next anniversary simply for the sake of
'Posterity'.


--
Johnny B Good
  #7  
Old September 28th 15, 09:09 AM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
Scott[_2_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 1,344
Default How does closing BBC Three save any money?

On Sun, 27 Sep 2015 23:36:44 +0200, Martin wrote:

On Sun, 27 Sep 2015 12:37:56 +0100, Scott wrote:

I see the 'closure' of BBC Three has not been postponed until after
Christmas. I still don't see how this move will save any money at
all. If BBC Three continues on-line then the production costs are
still there. The multiplex is still there, apparently with BBC One+1
so so savings in transmission costs. Is it maybe that rights cost
less if the audience is smaller?

On a related theme, is BBC One+1 still going ahead? I thought Ofcom
thought it was unfair competition?


BBC1+1 is not going ahead. How on earth can it be unfair competition?


Found it:
http://www.radiotimes.com/news/2015-...posal-rejected
  #8  
Old September 28th 15, 09:17 AM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
Brian-Gaff
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Posts: 576
Default How does closing BBC Three save any money?

I think a plus 24 might be better. One assumes though that it will only be
available when the kiddies channel is off.
To me with two third party kiddie channels now on for all day and night
should not the bbc up its kiddy channel game a bit?
Brian

--
From the Sofa of Brian Gaff Reply address is active
Remember, if you don't like where I post
or what I say, you don't have to
read my posts! :-)
"Scott" wrote in message
...
I see the 'closure' of BBC Three has not been postponed until after
Christmas. I still don't see how this move will save any money at
all. If BBC Three continues on-line then the production costs are
still there. The multiplex is still there, apparently with BBC One+1
so so savings in transmission costs. Is it maybe that rights cost
less if the audience is smaller?

On a related theme, is BBC One+1 still going ahead? I thought Ofcom
thought it was unfair competition?



  #9  
Old September 28th 15, 09:19 AM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
Brian-Gaff
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Posts: 576
Default How does closing BBC Three save any money?

Well anyway, at last Classic FM is now stereo on freeview.
Now just do the same for absolute, smooth and Magic and I'll throw this dab
radio in the skip.
Brian

--
From the Sofa of Brian Gaff Reply address is active
Remember, if you don't like where I post
or what I say, you don't have to
read my posts! :-)
"NY" wrote in message
o.uk...
"Scott" wrote in message
...
I see the 'closure' of BBC Three has not been postponed until after
Christmas. I still don't see how this move will save any money at
all. If BBC Three continues on-line then the production costs are
still there. The multiplex is still there, apparently with BBC One+1
so so savings in transmission costs. Is it maybe that rights cost
less if the audience is smaller?

On a related theme, is BBC One+1 still going ahead? I thought Ofcom
thought it was unfair competition?


How can Ofcom quibble about BBC One+1 when they allow ITV1+1, ITV3+1 etc?

Is the BBC Three HD slot on BBC B going to BBC One HD+1 as well? Or will
they bring BBC Four HD into BBC B so you don't need to be able to get Com7
to receive this channel? It seems odd that BBC B also carries ITV and
Channel 4 (non BBC) whereas Com7 carries BBC Four HD and BBC News HD - not
a very clear BBC vs non-BBC (Commercial) demarcation!

I wonder what other channels will go on Com8 -
http://www.digitaluk.co.uk/industry/...annel_listings only shows
QVC Beauty HD and QVC+1 HD, so there's loads of space capacity - probably
for similar dross :-(



  #10  
Old September 28th 15, 09:26 AM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
John Hall[_2_]
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Posts: 265
Default How does closing BBC Three save any money?

In message , Johnny B Good
writes
On Sun, 27 Sep 2015 16:57:44 +0100, John Hall wrote:

In message , Scott
writes
I see the 'closure' of BBC Three has not been postponed until after
Christmas.


Guessing that "not" should be "now".

It's been noticeable over recent months how one or two of the most
popular BBC Three programmes, such as "Family Guy", have started turning
up on BBC 1.

Correction, BBC TWO.


Sorry, my mistake.

Also (checking recording dates) they've been
broadcasting episodes of FG on BBC2 since at least the 5th of July of
this year


Yes, that sounds about right.

(I'm not sure I managed to capture the very first episodes of
this latest BBC2 series of FG).


After checking on Wikipedia, the first episode of the current series
seems to have been "The Simpsons Guy", a double-length episode that's a
crossover with The Simpsons (as you might have guessed).


So far I have a total of 33 episodes (from three different series)
tucked away on the NAS box with the last of tonight's trio of episodes
just about to finish airing which I'll top and tail and re-title before
moving them to the NAS box later on tonight.


The first of each Sunday's trio seems to be new, while the other two are
repeats from series previously aired on BBC 3, though not flagged up as
such.

Getting back to the business of the BBC ditching their BBC Three (now)
waste of bandwidth 'experiment gone wrong' channel (it was once a useful
platform for refreshingly funny comedy series in its early years), its
final demise on this 'platform' can't come soon enough afaiac.

snip

Apart from FG and American Dad, its "yoof" oriented programming has
contained nothing recently of interest to me either.
--
John Hall
"Honest criticism is hard to take,
particularly from a relative, a friend,
an acquaintance, or a stranger." Franklin P Jones
 




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