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Retuning the TV - naive question



 
 
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  #21  
Old September 24th 15, 10:19 PM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
Andy Furniss[_3_]
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Posts: 130
Default Retuning the TV - naive question

Paul Ratcliffe wrote:
On Thu, 24 Sep 2015 18:31:15 +0100, Andy Furniss [email protected] wrote:

The old/depreciated linux "scan"

It has now been depreciated by dvbv5-scan likewise the old tzap is


The word is DEPRECATED, without an I. Depreciated means something
completely different.


The word I wrote was the one I meant to in that depreciated meaning to
loose value over time.

I always think of the word deprecate in its English sense of disapproval
of, deplore, belittle not the modern software sense which I admit I
should have used here had I even thought to - it's one of those words I
never use. It sounds like some American invention, though I don't know
if it is or isn't.
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  #22  
Old September 25th 15, 08:06 AM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
Roderick Stewart[_3_]
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Posts: 2,246
Default Retuning the TV - naive question

On Thu, 24 Sep 2015 23:19:06 +0100, Andy Furniss [email protected] wrote:

The word is DEPRECATED, without an I. Depreciated means something
completely different.


The word I wrote was the one I meant to in that depreciated meaning to
loose value over time.

^

Oh dear!

If you're going to argue about words...

Rod.
  #23  
Old September 25th 15, 11:00 AM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
Bill Wright[_2_]
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Posts: 9,381
Default Retuning the TV - naive question

NY wrote:
"Bill Wright" wrote in message
...
NY wrote:

Where was that? Somewhere at the foot of the Dale right out towards
Leeming?

Higher up the dale near Leyburn on the hill that goes over to
Swaledale and Catterick.


Oh yes I can understand that, although it is rather surprising isn't it?

The last time I went in the Cross Keys at Bellerby was about thirty
years ago.


Ah yes, just down the road from our cottage in Barden. Well, not far
across the fields but quite a long way if you go round by the road.


I wish I lived somewhere nice like that.

Bill
  #24  
Old September 25th 15, 05:08 PM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
Paul Ratcliffe
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Posts: 2,486
Default Retuning the TV - naive question

On Thu, 24 Sep 2015 23:19:06 +0100, Andy Furniss [email protected] wrote:

The old/depreciated linux "scan"

It has now been depreciated by dvbv5-scan likewise the old tzap is


The word is DEPRECATED, without an I. Depreciated means something
completely different.


The word I wrote was the one I meant to in that depreciated meaning to
loose value over time.


It makes no sense as you used it, whether you intended it or not.

I always think of the word deprecate in its English sense of disapproval
of, deplore, belittle not the modern software sense which I admit I
should have used here had I even thought to - it's one of those words I
never use. It sounds like some American invention, though I don't know
if it is or isn't.


Your understanding is flawed.
  #25  
Old September 25th 15, 06:39 PM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
Andy Furniss[_3_]
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Posts: 130
Default Retuning the TV - naive question

Paul Ratcliffe wrote:
On Thu, 24 Sep 2015 23:19:06 +0100, Andy Furniss [email protected] wrote:

The old/depreciated linux "scan"

It has now been depreciated by dvbv5-scan likewise the old
tzap is

The word is DEPRECATED, without an I. Depreciated means something
completely different.


The word I wrote was the one I meant to in that depreciated
meaning to loose value over time.


It makes no sense as you used it, whether you intended it or not.

I always think of the word deprecate in its English sense of
disapproval of, deplore, belittle not the modern software sense
which I admit I should have used here had I even thought to - it's
one of those words I never use. It sounds like some American
invention, though I don't know if it is or isn't.


Your understanding is flawed.


Well it was just an explanation, I've never heard anyone say the word
deprecate in the software meaning. I have often heard the phrase "self
deprecating humor" or similar, so that's the meaning I attach to the word.
  #26  
Old September 25th 15, 06:42 PM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
Andy Furniss[_3_]
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Posts: 130
Default Retuning the TV - naive question

Roderick Stewart wrote:
On Thu, 24 Sep 2015 23:19:06 +0100, Andy Furniss [email protected] wrote:

The word is DEPRECATED, without an I. Depreciated means
something completely different.


The word I wrote was the one I meant to in that depreciated meaning
to loose value over time.

^

Oh dear!

If you're going to argue about words...


Oops, that was an unfortunately timed howler, I really should proof read
what I type.
  #27  
Old September 26th 15, 08:38 AM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
Jim Lesurf[_2_]
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Posts: 4,326
Default Retuning the TV - naive question

In article , Andy
Furniss [email protected] wrote:

Well it was just an explanation, I've never heard anyone say the word
deprecate in the software meaning. I have often heard the phrase "self
deprecating humor" or similar, so that's the meaning I attach to the
word.


Unlike Paul, I found your useage made sense. However if you'd ever tried to
learn to program using 'Java' in its early days you'd have rapidly learned
how programmers use the term 'deprecated'. They kept mucking the language
about all the time. Almost anything you wrote would duly turn out to have
used methods that then became 'deprecated' shortly afterwards. Real PITA.

I gave up and stuck with 'C'. ;-

Jim

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  #28  
Old September 26th 15, 10:57 AM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
Paul Ratcliffe
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Posts: 2,486
Default Retuning the TV - naive question

On Sat, 26 Sep 2015 09:38:52 +0100, Jim Lesurf wrote:

However if you'd ever tried to
learn to program using 'Java' in its early days you'd have rapidly learned
how programmers use the term 'deprecated'. They kept mucking the language
about all the time. Almost anything you wrote would duly turn out to have
used methods that then became 'deprecated' shortly afterwards. Real PITA.

I gave up and stuck with 'C'. ;-


Yes, Java was touted as "Write once, run anywhere" back then but in
reality it seems that you need the right JVM or Runtime or whatever and
if it isn't then you're dead in the water.
Updating to the latest as demanded (and I do mean demanded) by your OS
stops all your old stuff working. It's a right nuisance for legacy apps.
As one of my ex-colleagues once wrote... "Java is a donkey".

I gave up with C as well, as it's too hard having to manage the various
resources constantly, and use C++ now.
  #29  
Old September 26th 15, 11:40 AM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
NY
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Posts: 1,329
Default Retuning the TV - naive question

"Paul Ratcliffe" wrote in message
...
On Sat, 26 Sep 2015 09:38:52 +0100, Jim Lesurf
wrote:

However if you'd ever tried to
learn to program using 'Java' in its early days you'd have rapidly
learned
how programmers use the term 'deprecated'. They kept mucking the language
about all the time. Almost anything you wrote would duly turn out to have
used methods that then became 'deprecated' shortly afterwards. Real PITA.

I gave up and stuck with 'C'. ;-


Yes, Java was touted as "Write once, run anywhere" back then but in
reality it seems that you need the right JVM or Runtime or whatever and
if it isn't then you're dead in the water.
Updating to the latest as demanded (and I do mean demanded) by your OS
stops all your old stuff working. It's a right nuisance for legacy apps.
As one of my ex-colleagues once wrote... "Java is a donkey".

I gave up with C as well, as it's too hard having to manage the various
resources constantly, and use C++ now.


What really lets down C, compared with Pascal etc, is the pointer thing. I
spent more time sorting out problems with "does this function want a thing,
a pointer to the thing or a pointer to a pointer to the thing as an
argument" than with anything else when debugging why programs didn't work.

The other thing, and Kernighan and Ritchie's book is to blame for this, is
purely stylistic: why did they use the layout

if (a b) {
c =d;
e = f:
}
g = h;

rather than

if (a b)
{
c =d;
e = f:
}
g = h;

It is much easier (I find) to check for mismatched braces with the second
layout and it mirrors the Pascal case where { and } are replaced by begin
and end, conventionally indented equally to line up with the lines that they
enclose. At least many pretty-printer programs that reformat source code to
standard indentation, allow the equal indentation of braces style as an
alternative to the K&R style.

C is an excellent language, but it makes it far too easy for people to write
programs that are "write-only": that only make sense to the author and which
are almost indecipherable to anyone else. And a lot of that it due to "side
effects" being not just allowed but encouraged:

Suppose I'd written

if (a = b)

That would have had the side effect of assigning the value of b to variable
a, and would have switched depending on that value of b was 0 - not what was
probably intended by the line which should have been

if (a == b)


Loops constructed as

for (a=0; a 10; a++)
{
lines
}

are somehow less intuitive than Basic's

for a=0 to 10 step 1
lines
next a

or Pascal's equivalent, whose syntax escapes me for the moment but it's very
similar to Basic's IIRC.

  #30  
Old September 26th 15, 11:53 AM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
Andy Burns[_9_]
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Posts: 389
Default Retuning the TV - naive question

NY wrote:

if (a b)
{
c =d;
e = f:
}
g = h;

It is much easier (I find) to check for mismatched braces


Whitesmiths style; I've always used it for C/java/jscript even though I
know it's not very popular.


 




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