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-   -   What units? (https://www.digitaltvbanter.co.uk/showthread.php?t=34392)

Davey July 20th 15 11:36 PM

What units?
 
There is one of those 'Destroyed in Seconds' programmes on Quest right
now. The first item I saw showed a dragster crash. The subtitles gave
distances, speeds etc in Imperial units, but the commentary used metric
units. Most confusing.

Soon after Canada changed to metric, I was at the Hope Slide, a place
in British Columbia where some years before there had been a terrible
landslide. There was a descriptive board, with all distances quoted in
Imperial units. But the Metricators had come along, and made a small
block of wood to fit over each written measurement, with the new metric
values instead.
'Amateurish' only begins to describe the effect.

For everyone's education:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hope_Slide

http://www.penmachine.com/photoessay...hopeslide.html

--
Davey.

Brian-Gaff July 21st 15 07:39 AM

What units?
 
I can remember back when we went to metric, some tourist sites which had ye
olde shops to attract Japanese tourists etc, which had been hastilly
converted with what looked like post it notes and felt tip pen. Kind of
destroyed the whole idea of the retro look of the joint. I mean the whole
idea was for it to look old for goodness sake.
Brian

--
From the Sofa of Brian Gaff Reply address is active
"Davey" wrote in message
...
There is one of those 'Destroyed in Seconds' programmes on Quest right
now. The first item I saw showed a dragster crash. The subtitles gave
distances, speeds etc in Imperial units, but the commentary used metric
units. Most confusing.

Soon after Canada changed to metric, I was at the Hope Slide, a place
in British Columbia where some years before there had been a terrible
landslide. There was a descriptive board, with all distances quoted in
Imperial units. But the Metricators had come along, and made a small
block of wood to fit over each written measurement, with the new metric
values instead.
'Amateurish' only begins to describe the effect.

For everyone's education:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hope_Slide

http://www.penmachine.com/photoessay...hopeslide.html

--
Davey.




Paul Cummins[_5_] July 21st 15 08:18 AM

What units?
 
In article ,
(Chris Hogg) wrote:

It really irritates me when text written with imperial units has then
been metricated, and says things like 'the two points were roughly a
yard (0.914 metres) apart', or 'we had to drive about a mile (1.609
kilometres) further'. If it's approximately an imperial unit then
give an approximate metric unit, not an exact conversion,


I'm of a generation that grew up with Metric in the schoolroom and
Imperial in the home. This included money - my parents would still think
of things in terms of shillings and blame inflation on the Decimal system.
Even now my mother states that in 1971, Unleaded petrol was only a couple
of shillings a gallon, and diesel was tuppence ha'penny cheaper... until
I point out that Unleaded was only introduced in the 1980's, and Diesel
didn't make it to the common people much earlier.

Anyway, this means that if I am thrown a figure in one system I can
normally convert in my head to a reasonable approximation of the other in
real time. I am sure this is not unique - but have the younger (35)
generation not learned both?

--
Paul Cummins - Always a NetHead
Wasting Bandwidth since 1981
Please Help us dispose of unwanted virtual currency:
Bitcoin: 1LzAJBqzoaEudhsZ14W7YrdYSmLZ5m1seZ


Indy Jess John July 21st 15 08:21 AM

What units?
 
On 21/07/2015 08:42, Chris Hogg wrote:

It really irritates me when text written with imperial units has then
been metricated, and says things like 'the two points were roughly a
yard (0.914 metres) apart', or 'we had to drive about a mile (1.609
kilometres) further'. If it's approximately an imperial unit then give
an approximate metric unit, not an exact conversion, FFS!

Then some wag will convert what is essentially a description, so that a
cowboy wearing a ten-gallon hat will describe it as a 45.46 litre hat.
The thing that annoys me most is that all UK road signs are in miles and
yet the BBC will insist on giving distances in Kilometres. I did start
calculating Km to miles in my head to give me a sense of scale, but now
don't bother. I just ignore them as meaningless distances, since they
are not going to directly affect me.

When coinage was decimalised, I was working for a while near the
Barbican in London, and down the road was a jeweller's shop that didn't
decimalise, just rounded all prices to the nearest shilling. I never
bought anything there so I don't know if he would accept a 5p coin as a
shilling, though at the time they were the same size and metal as the
old shilling coins still in circulation, so he probably did.

So while everybody was repricing things in pounds and "new pence", he
didn't bother and left prices in his window in the format 5/18/-. If
the gossip in the local pub was true the jeweller had a year to go
before retirement and wasn't going to mess around with this new-fangled
money.

Jim


Paul Cummins[_5_] July 21st 15 08:27 AM

What units?
 
In article ,
(Indy Jess John) wrote:

I don't know if he would accept a 5p coin as a
shilling, though at the time they were the same size and metal as
the old shilling coins still in circulation, so he probably did.


I certainly accepted shillings and florins as 5p and 10p coins growing up,
until about 1990.

Still regret them being changed.

--
Paul Cummins - Always a NetHead
Wasting Bandwidth since 1981
Please Help us dispose of unwanted virtual currency:
Bitcoin: 1LzAJBqzoaEudhsZ14W7YrdYSmLZ5m1seZ


John Hall[_2_] July 21st 15 10:04 AM

What units?
 
In message , Chris Hogg
writes
It really irritates me when text written with imperial units has then
been metricated, and says things like 'the two points were roughly a
yard (0.914 metres) apart', or 'we had to drive about a mile (1.609
kilometres) further'. If it's approximately an imperial unit then give
an approximate metric unit, not an exact conversion, FFS!


It annoys me too. The Telegraph, which seems to think that its readers
can't cope with degrees Celsius, is a frequent offender. You often see
things like "forecasters said that temperatures could fall as low as
17.6F (-8C)".
--
I'm not paid to implement the recognition of irony.
(Taken, with the author's permission, from a LiveJournal post)


Roderick Stewart[_3_] July 21st 15 10:14 AM

What units?
 
On Tue, 21 Jul 2015 09:21:30 +0100, Indy Jess John
wrote:

It really irritates me when text written with imperial units has then
been metricated, and says things like 'the two points were roughly a
yard (0.914 metres) apart', or 'we had to drive about a mile (1.609
kilometres) further'. If it's approximately an imperial unit then give
an approximate metric unit, not an exact conversion, FFS!

Then some wag will convert what is essentially a description, so that a
cowboy wearing a ten-gallon hat will describe it as a 45.46 litre hat.
The thing that annoys me most is that all UK road signs are in miles and
yet the BBC will insist on giving distances in Kilometres. I did start
calculating Km to miles in my head to give me a sense of scale, but now
don't bother. I just ignore them as meaningless distances, since they
are not going to directly affect me.


I remember a magazine (Studio Sound I think) that had to make
frequent reference to quarter inch tape, but insisted on calling it
6.25mm tape. I don't know it they were not very good at calculations,
or if they thought for some reason that 6.25 looked nicer than 6.35.
Approximation by truncating unnecessary digits is perfectly
reasonable, but including digits with wrong values is something else.

Rod.

Davey July 21st 15 10:28 AM

What units?
 
On Tue, 21 Jul 2015 09:21:30 +0100
Indy Jess John wrote:

So while everybody was repricing things in pounds and "new pence", he
didn't bother and left prices in his window in the format £5/18/-.
If the gossip in the local pub was true the jeweller had a year to go
before retirement and wasn't going to mess around with this
new-fangled money.


An old-school engineer I worked with described the process as
'metrifuction'. (Spelling optional).

--
Davey.


Charles Hope July 21st 15 10:31 AM

What units?
 
In article ,
Paul Cummins wrote:
In article ,
(Chris Hogg) wrote:


It really irritates me when text written with imperial units has then
been metricated, and says things like 'the two points were roughly a
yard (0.914 metres) apart', or 'we had to drive about a mile (1.609
kilometres) further'. If it's approximately an imperial unit then
give an approximate metric unit, not an exact conversion,


I'm of a generation that grew up with Metric in the schoolroom and
Imperial in the home. This included money - my parents would still think
of things in terms of shillings and blame inflation on the Decimal system.
Even now my mother states that in 1971, Unleaded petrol was only a couple
of shillings a gallon,


Well, she is wrong. Even in 1965 (when I bought my Anglia Estate) it was
4/11 a gallon, if you were lucky. A couple of shillings a gallon was back
in the 40s.


Davey July 21st 15 10:35 AM

What units?
 
On Tue, 21 Jul 2015 11:31:03 +0100
Charles Hope wrote:

In article ,
Paul Cummins wrote:
In article ,
(Chris Hogg) wrote:


It really irritates me when text written with imperial units has
then been metricated, and says things like 'the two points were
roughly a yard (0.914 metres) apart', or 'we had to drive about a
mile (1.609 kilometres) further'. If it's approximately an
imperial unit then give an approximate metric unit, not an exact
conversion,


I'm of a generation that grew up with Metric in the schoolroom and
Imperial in the home. This included money - my parents would still
think of things in terms of shillings and blame inflation on the
Decimal system. Even now my mother states that in 1971, Unleaded
petrol was only a couple of shillings a gallon,


Well, she is wrong. Even in 1965 (when I bought my Anglia Estate) it
was 4/11 a gallon, if you were lucky. A couple of shillings a gallon
was back in the 40s.


Yup. When I was driving my 3-wheeler, which defines the year as 1966-67,
two gallons of petrol (a tankful) cost 10 bob, with thruppence change.
That was at a Jet station, cheaper than others locally.
Any concept of two-shilling per gallon petrol in 1971 is a non-starter.
Unleaded? 1, 2, 3 or 4-Star, maybe.

--
Davey.


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