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What units?



 
 
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  #51  
Old July 24th 15, 11:35 AM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
Charles Hope
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 49
Default What units?

In article ,
Davey wrote:
On Fri, 24 Jul 2015 12:07:17 +0100
"Geoff Pearson" wrote:


When I started driving in 1966 my father would give me 1 "to fill
her up". That paid for 4 gallons.


That matches my memory of 10s for two gallons, with change.


but not in the '70s, as was originally suggested

-


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  #52  
Old July 24th 15, 11:40 AM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
Peter Duncanson
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 4,272
Default What units?

On Fri, 24 Jul 2015 12:10:22 +0100, "Geoff Pearson"
wrote:

"NY" wrote in message
news:[email protected] co.uk...

wrote in message
.. .
On Tue, 21 Jul 2015 09:27 +0100 (BST),
(Paul Cummins) wrote:

In article ,

(Indy Jess John) wrote:

I don't know if he would accept a 5p coin as a
shilling, though at the time they were the same size and metal as
the old shilling coins still in circulation, so he probably did.

I certainly accepted shillings and florins as 5p and 10p coins growing up,
until about 1990.

Still regret them being changed.


The Florin was a really a decimal coin leftover from the previous
abortive attempt to introduce decimal currency in Victorian times.
There wasn't really a need for a two shilling coin when the half crown
at two shillings and sixpence was already in use but a coin that was
one tenth of a pound at two shillings was introduced as an experiment,
the coin that was to be one hundredth of a pound never got beyond the
discussion stage.


So the half-crown actually predates the florin (2 shilling) coin? I never
knew that. I always thought that the 2/6 (half-crown) was the odd one out
because it was not a whole number of shillings, even if it was 1/4 of a
pound.

Can I make a plea in this thread: spare a pity for the poor sods like me who
aren't too familiar with the name of the coins and refer to them as
sixpence, shilling, two-shilling, 2/6, rather than tanner, bob, florin, etc.
Likewise for nickel, dime etc in American coins.

I experienced the standard problem with US coins that the 10c coin is
smaller than the 5c coin even though it is made of the same metal and is the
same shape (ie not distinguished by being 7-sided or whatever): I was
forever handing over 5c coins thinking they were 10c. Most shops etc were
very understanding and a few shopkeepers confessed that they still got
confused and thought the sizes were the wrong way round.


We still have crowns - 5 shillings. I have Churchill, and Queen's Jubilee
examples. Dividing a pound of 240 pence into 8 was quite convenient.
Decimal is not so good for fractions - look at 60 minutes.


The crown coin is now 5 pounds.
http://www.royalmint.com/discover/uk...ive-pound-coin


Five Pound Coin

United Kingdom £5 Coin (Commemorative Crown)

First Issued 4 August 1990 (previously crowns had a face
value of 25 pence)

The Winston Churchill Memorial crown (1965) was Five Shillings.
The Queen's Golden and Diamond Jubilee crowns were £5.

--
Peter Duncanson
(in uk.tech.digital-tv)
  #53  
Old July 24th 15, 11:44 AM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
Peter Duncanson
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 4,272
Default What units?

On Fri, 24 Jul 2015 12:40:54 +0100, Peter Duncanson
wrote:

On Fri, 24 Jul 2015 12:10:22 +0100, "Geoff Pearson"
wrote:

"NY" wrote in message
news:[email protected] .co.uk...

wrote in message
. ..
On Tue, 21 Jul 2015 09:27 +0100 (BST),
(Paul Cummins) wrote:

In article ,

(Indy Jess John) wrote:

I don't know if he would accept a 5p coin as a
shilling, though at the time they were the same size and metal as
the old shilling coins still in circulation, so he probably did.

I certainly accepted shillings and florins as 5p and 10p coins growing up,
until about 1990.

Still regret them being changed.

The Florin was a really a decimal coin leftover from the previous
abortive attempt to introduce decimal currency in Victorian times.
There wasn't really a need for a two shilling coin when the half crown
at two shillings and sixpence was already in use but a coin that was
one tenth of a pound at two shillings was introduced as an experiment,
the coin that was to be one hundredth of a pound never got beyond the
discussion stage.


So the half-crown actually predates the florin (2 shilling) coin? I never
knew that. I always thought that the 2/6 (half-crown) was the odd one out
because it was not a whole number of shillings, even if it was 1/4 of a
pound.

Can I make a plea in this thread: spare a pity for the poor sods like me who
aren't too familiar with the name of the coins and refer to them as
sixpence, shilling, two-shilling, 2/6, rather than tanner, bob, florin, etc.
Likewise for nickel, dime etc in American coins.

I experienced the standard problem with US coins that the 10c coin is
smaller than the 5c coin even though it is made of the same metal and is the
same shape (ie not distinguished by being 7-sided or whatever): I was
forever handing over 5c coins thinking they were 10c. Most shops etc were
very understanding and a few shopkeepers confessed that they still got
confused and thought the sizes were the wrong way round.


We still have crowns - 5 shillings. I have Churchill, and Queen's Jubilee
examples. Dividing a pound of 240 pence into 8 was quite convenient.
Decimal is not so good for fractions - look at 60 minutes.


The crown coin is now 5 pounds.
http://www.royalmint.com/discover/uk...ive-pound-coin


Five Pound Coin

United Kingdom £5 Coin (Commemorative Crown)

First Issued 4 August 1990 (previously crowns had a face
value of 25 pence)

The Winston Churchill Memorial crown (1965) was Five Shillings.
The Queen's Golden and Diamond Jubilee crowns were £5.


The Queen's Silver Jubilee crown was 25p.

--
Peter Duncanson
(in uk.tech.digital-tv)
  #54  
Old July 24th 15, 01:03 PM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
Davey
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 2,310
Default What units?

On Fri, 24 Jul 2015 12:35:40 +0100
Charles Hope wrote:

In article ,
Davey wrote:
On Fri, 24 Jul 2015 12:07:17 +0100
"Geoff Pearson" wrote:


When I started driving in 1966 my father would give me £1 "to fill
her up". That paid for 4 gallons.


That matches my memory of 10s for two gallons, with change.


but not in the '70s, as was originally suggested

-



Agreed. I was merely corroborating the 1966 price from my own
experience.

--
Davey.

  #55  
Old July 24th 15, 01:08 PM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
Peter Duncanson
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 4,272
Default What units?

On Fri, 24 Jul 2015 14:06:39 +0100, wrote:

On Fri, 24 Jul 2015 12:44:34 +0100, Peter Duncanson
wrote:


We still have crowns - 5 shillings. I have Churchill, and Queen's Jubilee
examples. Dividing a pound of 240 pence into 8 was quite convenient.
Decimal is not so good for fractions - look at 60 minutes.

The crown coin is now 5 pounds.
http://www.royalmint.com/discover/uk...ive-pound-coin



The Winston Churchill Memorial crown (1965) was Five Shillings.
The Queen's Golden and Diamond Jubilee crowns were £5.


The Queen's Silver Jubilee crown was 25p.


Which just happened to be the Bus fare for a frequent journey on the
outskirts of Southampton to Romsey I was making at the time,
one of the drivers sarcastically remarked to me that having the
correct fare available would be useful which was unfortunate for him
as Romsey Post Office had stacks of the Jubilee crown in stock and I
obtained twenty Pounds worth. For the next month or so when that
driver was on duty I handed him a crown for the fare,which caused him
a bit of bother as my exact fare Crown coin had no where to go as all
normal coins had there own chute they were slid into so he had to faff
around putting into a small bag.

A nice example of "Be careful what you wish for".

--
Peter Duncanson
(in uk.tech.digital-tv)
  #59  
Old July 24th 15, 05:27 PM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
John Hall[_2_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 265
Default What units?

In message , Paul
Cummins writes
In article ,
(Peter Duncanson) wrote:

A nice example of "Be careful what you wish for".


I wish that they'd produce both a 99p coin and a 95p coin.


Then the shops will no doubt change their prices to end in 98p and 94p.
--
I'm not paid to implement the recognition of irony.
(Taken, with the author's permission, from a LiveJournal post)

  #60  
Old July 24th 15, 10:41 PM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
Phi
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 318
Default What units?


"Martin" wrote in message
news
On Fri, 24 Jul 2015 12:07:17 +0100, "Geoff Pearson"

wrote:

"Charles Hope" wrote in message
.. .

In article ,
Johnny B Good wrote:
On Tue, 21 Jul 2015 16:27:49 +0100, Jeff Layman wrote:


On 21/07/15 11:35, Davey wrote:
On Tue, 21 Jul 2015 11:31:03 +0100 Charles Hope
wrote:

In article ,
Paul Cummins wrote:
In article ,
(Chris Hogg) wrote:

It really irritates me when text written with imperial units has
then been metricated, and says things like 'the two points were
roughly a yard (0.914 metres) apart', or 'we had to drive about a
mile (1.609 kilometres) further'. If it's approximately an
imperial
unit then give an approximate metric unit, not an exact
conversion,

I'm of a generation that grew up with Metric in the schoolroom and
Imperial in the home. This included money - my parents would still
think of things in terms of shillings and blame inflation on the
Decimal system. Even now my mother states that in 1971, Unleaded
petrol was only a couple of shillings a gallon,

Well, she is wrong. Even in 1965 (when I bought my Anglia Estate) it
was 4/11 a gallon, if you were lucky. A couple of shillings a
gallon
was back in the 40s.


Yup. When I was driving my 3-wheeler, which defines the year as
1966-67,
two gallons of petrol (a tankful) cost 10 bob, with thruppence
change.
That was at a Jet station, cheaper than others locally.
Any concept of two-shilling per gallon petrol in 1971 is a
non-starter.
Unleaded? 1, 2, 3 or 4-Star, maybe.

https://www.theaa.com/public_affairs/reports/
Petrol_Prices_1896_todate_gallons.pdf


My abiding memory of pre-decimilasation petroleum pricing was also 4/11
a gallon. I may be wrong but ISTR that decimilasation was used as an
excuse to apply a price hike to take it up to the full "Five Bob", i.e.
a
full 25 pence for a gallon (BTW, a price of only 5.5p a litre!).


I'm sure that 4/11 in the mid 60s was only for Mobil 3 star (as it was
later called). I'm certain the regular price was over 5/- by the time
decimal curreny appeared.

When I started driving in 1966 my father would give me 1 "to fill her
up".
That paid for 4 gallons.


I paid 2/6 for half a gallon of petrol for my BSA Bantam around 1961.
--

Martin in Zuid Holland



Petrol plus oil

 




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