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Churchill funeral



 
 
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  #1  
Old January 31st 15, 07:53 PM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
Bill Wright[_2_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 9,381
Default Churchill funeral

Here's a snippet from Another Place:

I’ve just finished watching Winston Churchill’s funeral (as shown on BBC
Parliament yesterday), and a few thoughts spring to mind…

– Bearing in mind the technology (or lack of) the BBC had back then,
they did a fantastic job of covering the occasion.

– Richard Dimbleby was a master of his craft, particularly when he had
nothing to say because he would say nothing. It is a shame that his
successors are too fond of their own voices and just don’t know when to
STFU.

– At no point did I think “What we need now is Fearne Cotton to
interrupt proceedings with something completely irrelevant”.

– Members of the public were not asked to “tell us what you think” or
“give us your view”. I don’t care what they thought then, and I still
don’t now.

– Churchill was often referred to as “the dead man”, because that is
what he was. No fannying around in a worry trying not to offend anybody,
just telling it like it was.

– And at no point was the phrase “… and Labour says …” used.

Bill
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  #2  
Old January 31st 15, 09:07 PM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
Woody[_5_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 1,865
Default Churchill funeral


"Bill Wright" wrote in message
...
Here's a snippet from Another Place:

I’ve just finished watching Winston Churchill’s funeral (as shown on
BBC Parliament yesterday), and a few thoughts spring to mind…

– Bearing in mind the technology (or lack of) the BBC had back then,
they did a fantastic job of covering the occasion.

– Richard Dimbleby was a master of his craft, particularly when he
had nothing to say because he would say nothing. It is a shame that
his successors are too fond of their own voices and just don’t know
when to STFU.

– At no point did I think “What we need now is Fearne Cotton to
interrupt proceedings with something completely irrelevant”.

– Members of the public were not asked to “tell us what you think”
or “give us your view”. I don’t care what they thought then, and I
still don’t now.

– Churchill was often referred to as “the dead man”, because that is
what he was. No fannying around in a worry trying not to offend
anybody, just telling it like it was.

– And at no point was the phrase “… and Labour says …” used.



I remember watching that, not helped by the fact that my paternal
grandmother did exactly a week before WC. What does stick in my mind
was, not only did I see my father cry for the first time in my life at
his mother's funeral, but that both my father and mother were openly
weeping whilst watching the TV coverage - especailly the bit where the
crane jibs were lowered.

I read somewhere fairly recently that British Rail (as it was then)
had cleared the tracks for the whole route so that it could get
through without even having to pause but also so that people along the
line - and many indeed did stand at trackside - would have an
uninterupted view of the train passing. They couldn't do that today I
suspect.

http://svsfilm.com/nineelms/wcf.htm
This is an interesting read of the details of that train journey told
by the Fireman.


--
Woody

harrogate3 at ntlworld dot com


  #3  
Old January 31st 15, 11:23 PM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
Davey
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 2,310
Default Churchill funeral

On Sat, 31 Jan 2015 22:07:29 -0000
"Woody" wrote:


"Bill Wright" wrote in message
...
Here's a snippet from Another Place:

I’ve just finished watching Winston Churchill’s funeral (as shown
on BBC Parliament yesterday), and a few thoughts spring to mind…

– Bearing in mind the technology (or lack of) the BBC had back
then, they did a fantastic job of covering the occasion.

– Richard Dimbleby was a master of his craft, particularly when he
had nothing to say because he would say nothing. It is a shame that
his successors are too fond of their own voices and just don’t know
when to STFU.

– At no point did I think “What we need now is Fearne Cotton to
interrupt proceedings with something completely irrelevant”.

– Members of the public were not asked to “tell us what you think”
or “give us your view”. I don’t care what they thought then, and I
still don’t now.

– Churchill was often referred to as “the dead man”, because that
is what he was. No fannying around in a worry trying not to offend
anybody, just telling it like it was.

– And at no point was the phrase “… and Labour says …” used.



I remember watching that, not helped by the fact that my paternal
grandmother did exactly a week before WC. What does stick in my mind
was, not only did I see my father cry for the first time in my life
at his mother's funeral, but that both my father and mother were
openly weeping whilst watching the TV coverage - especailly the bit
where the crane jibs were lowered.

I read somewhere fairly recently that British Rail (as it was then)
had cleared the tracks for the whole route so that it could get
through without even having to pause but also so that people along
the line - and many indeed did stand at trackside - would have an
uninterupted view of the train passing. They couldn't do that today I
suspect.

http://svsfilm.com/nineelms/wcf.htm
This is an interesting read of the details of that train journey told
by the Fireman.



One of the things I remember especially of the coverage of the journey
was the superb smooth take-off of the train with the coffin on board.

--
Davey.

  #4  
Old February 1st 15, 04:10 AM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
Geoff Pearson
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 570
Default Churchill funeral


"Bill Wright" wrote in message
...
Here's a snippet from Another Place:

I’ve just finished watching Winston Churchill’s funeral (as shown on BBC
Parliament yesterday), and a few thoughts spring to mind…

– Bearing in mind the technology (or lack of) the BBC had back then, they
did a fantastic job of covering the occasion.

– Richard Dimbleby was a master of his craft, particularly when he had
nothing to say because he would say nothing. It is a shame that his
successors are too fond of their own voices and just don’t know when to
STFU.

– At no point did I think “What we need now is Fearne Cotton to interrupt
proceedings with something completely irrelevant”.

– Members of the public were not asked to “tell us what you think” or
“give us your view”. I don’t care what they thought then, and I still don’t
now.

– Churchill was often referred to as “the dead man”, because that is what
he was. No fannying around in a worry trying not to offend anybody, just
telling it like it was.

– And at no point was the phrase “… and Labour says …” used.

Bill


I'm halfway through watching it - and it revives memories - the relentless
drumming of all kinds. Really good quality pictures for such a dark day and,
of course Dimbleby- brilliant. The opening 10 minutes of setting the scene
is a documentary of the lost London skyline.

  #5  
Old February 1st 15, 08:11 AM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
Jeff Layman[_2_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 723
Default Churchill funeral

On 31/01/15 20:53, Bill Wright wrote:
Here's a snippet from Another Place:

I’ve just finished watching Winston Churchill’s funeral (as shown on BBC
Parliament yesterday), and a few thoughts spring to mind…

– Bearing in mind the technology (or lack of) the BBC had back then,
they did a fantastic job of covering the occasion.


What impressed me was seeing it in colour for the first time. I remember
watching it on TV at the time, and it was, of course, just black and
white.

I don't remember the credits at the end, but was it only BBC film? If
so, why were the BBC filming it in colour?

--

Jeff
  #6  
Old February 1st 15, 08:28 AM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
John Hall[_2_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 265
Default Churchill funeral

In message , Jeff Layman
writes
What impressed me was seeing it in colour for the first time. I
remember watching it on TV at the time, and it was, of course, just
black and white.

I don't remember the credits at the end, but was it only BBC film? If
so, why were the BBC filming it in colour?


Thinking of posterity? Or maybe they'd managed to sell their coverage to
a US network?
--
I'm not paid to implement the recognition of irony.
(Taken, with the author's permission, from a LiveJournal post)

  #7  
Old February 1st 15, 09:02 AM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
Woody[_5_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 1,865
Default Churchill funeral


"Davey" wrote in message
...
On Sat, 31 Jan 2015 22:07:29 -0000
"Woody" wrote:


"Bill Wright" wrote in message
...
Here's a snippet from Another Place:

I've just finished watching Winston Churchill's funeral (as shown
on BBC Parliament yesterday), and a few thoughts spring to mind.

- Bearing in mind the technology (or lack of) the BBC had back
then, they did a fantastic job of covering the occasion.

- Richard Dimbleby was a master of his craft, particularly when he
had nothing to say because he would say nothing. It is a shame
that
his successors are too fond of their own voices and just don't
know
when to STFU.

- At no point did I think "What we need now is Fearne Cotton to
interrupt proceedings with something completely irrelevant".

- Members of the public were not asked to "tell us what you think"
or "give us your view". I don't care what they thought then, and I
still don't now.

- Churchill was often referred to as "the dead man", because that
is what he was. No fannying around in a worry trying not to offend
anybody, just telling it like it was.

- And at no point was the phrase ". and Labour says ." used.



I remember watching that, not helped by the fact that my paternal
grandmother did exactly a week before WC. What does stick in my mind
was, not only did I see my father cry for the first time in my life
at his mother's funeral, but that both my father and mother were
openly weeping whilst watching the TV coverage - especailly the bit
where the crane jibs were lowered.

I read somewhere fairly recently that British Rail (as it was then)
had cleared the tracks for the whole route so that it could get
through without even having to pause but also so that people along
the line - and many indeed did stand at trackside - would have an
uninterupted view of the train passing. They couldn't do that today
I
suspect.

http://svsfilm.com/nineelms/wcf.htm
This is an interesting read of the details of that train journey
told
by the Fireman.



One of the things I remember especially of the coverage of the
journey
was the superb smooth take-off of the train with the coffin on board.




Read the link above and you'll find out why,


--
Woody

harrogate3 at ntlworld dot com


  #8  
Old February 1st 15, 09:19 AM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
Alan White[_2_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 447
Default Churchill funeral

On Sun, 1 Feb 2015 09:28:29 +0000, John Hall
wrote:

Thinking of posterity?


I reckoned that too. It was in the days when the BBC actually thought
about things like that.

--
Alan White
Mozilla Firefox and Forte Agent.
By Loch Long, twenty-eight miles NW of Glasgow, Scotland.
Webcam and weather:- http://windycroft.co.uk/weather
  #9  
Old February 1st 15, 09:43 AM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
Davey
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 2,310
Default Churchill funeral

On Sun, 1 Feb 2015 10:02:52 -0000
"Woody" wrote:

One of the things I remember especially of the coverage of the
journey
was the superb smooth take-off of the train with the coffin on
board.




Read the link above and you'll find out why,


I had already read it, thanks. Just recounting my personal memory.

--
Davey.
  #10  
Old February 1st 15, 09:46 AM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
Davey
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 2,310
Default Churchill funeral

On Sat, 31 Jan 2015 20:53:23 +0000
Bill Wright wrote:

snip

– At no point did I think “What we need now is Fearne Cotton to
interrupt proceedings with something completely irrelevant”.

– Members of the public were not asked to “tell us what you think” or
“give us your view”. I don’t care what they thought then, and I still
don’t now.

– Churchill was often referred to as “the dead man”, because that is
what he was. No fannying around in a worry trying not to offend
anybody, just telling it like it was.

– And at no point was the phrase “… and Labour says …” used.

Bill


When I lived in Michigan, this was a continuing problem with US
broadcast of solemn events, somebody had to always be saying
something, and it was often incorrect. In contrast, Canadian coverage
was much more like the old BBC method, only talk when there is
something to say that will help. It was a huge contrast in styles.

--
Davey.

 




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