A Sky, cable and digital tv forum. Digital TV Banter

If this is your first visit, be sure to check out the FAQ by clicking the link above. You may have to register before you can post: click the register link above to proceed. To start viewing messages, select the forum that you want to visit from the selection below.

Go Back   Home » Digital TV Banter forum » Digital TV Newsgroups » uk.tech.digital-tv (Digital TV - General)
Site Map Home Register Authors List Search Today's Posts Mark Forums Read Web Partners

uk.tech.digital-tv (Digital TV - General) (uk.tech.digital-tv) Discussion of all matters technical in origin related to the reception of digital television transmissions, be they via satellite, terrestrial or cable. Advertising is forbidden, with no exceptions.

TOT Those new light bulbs.



 
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
  #1  
Old January 21st 14, 02:02 PM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
[email protected]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 61
Default TOT Those new light bulbs.

Apologies for raising this here, but I don't know
another forum where the topic might get taken seriously.

These new light bulbs - the ones with the little
bulb inside an old style casing - seem to blow
very quickly. They don't seem to last anything
like the promised coulple of years.

Or have I just been unlucky?

PS You can get previous Euromillions
results on TVE Internacional text page 472.
Ads
  #2  
Old January 21st 14, 02:05 PM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
James Harris[_2_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 5
Default TOT Those new light bulbs.

wrote in message
...
Apologies for raising this here, but I don't know
another forum where the topic might get taken seriously.

These new light bulbs - the ones with the little
bulb inside an old style casing - seem to blow
very quickly. They don't seem to last anything
like the promised coulple of years.


You could try uk.d-i-y.

James


  #3  
Old January 21st 14, 05:03 PM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
Woody[_5_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 1,865
Default TOT Those new light bulbs.

wrote in message
...
Apologies for raising this here, but I don't know
another forum where the topic might get taken seriously.

These new light bulbs - the ones with the little
bulb inside an old style casing - seem to blow
very quickly. They don't seem to last anything
like the promised coulple of years.

Or have I just been unlucky?

PS You can get previous Euromillions
results on TVE Internacional text page 472.



Presuming you mean halogens - usually rated about 20% less
than the GLS equivalent, i.e 48W halogen for a 60W GLS? They
should last better and longer than a conventional bulb.

It is unlikely you have been unlucky assuming you are buying
a decent brand, so there are two options: either you have
very spikey mains, or you have poor quality light switches.

In terms of the latter, a halogen bulb has a relatively high
inrush current when first switched on. If your switch
contacts are old and/or bouncing (and possibly arcing) it
can easily blow such a bulb. Try changing one switch where
bulbs regularly fail for a good brand such as Crabtree or MK
and see what happens.


--
Woody

harrogate three at ntlworld dot com


  #4  
Old January 21st 14, 07:13 PM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
Brian Gaff
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 7,250
Default TOT Those new light bulbs.

Which new light bulbs. Not much to go on here.
Brian

--
From the Sofa of Brian Gaff Reply address is active
wrote in message
...
Apologies for raising this here, but I don't know
another forum where the topic might get taken seriously.

These new light bulbs - the ones with the little
bulb inside an old style casing - seem to blow
very quickly. They don't seem to last anything
like the promised coulple of years.

Or have I just been unlucky?

PS You can get previous Euromillions
results on TVE Internacional text page 472.



  #5  
Old January 21st 14, 08:59 PM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
Graham.[_2_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 1,500
Default TOT Those new light bulbs.

On Tue, 21 Jan 2014 19:13:38 -0000, "Brian Gaff"
wrote:

Which new light bulbs. Not much to go on here.
Brian



I know what he means Brian. Since the light bulb "ban" the trend had
been for a quartz halogen capsule enclosed in a GLS style envelope.


--
Graham.


%Profound_observation%
  #6  
Old January 21st 14, 11:25 PM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
[email protected]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 61
Default TOT Those new light bulbs.

On Tuesday, 21 January 2014 17:03:49 UTC, Woody wrote:
semiretired wrote


Apologies for raising this here, but I don't know
another forum where the topic might get taken seriously.
These new light bulbs - the ones with the little
bulb inside an old style casing - seem to blow
very quickly. They don't seem to last anything
like the promised coulple of years.
Or have I just been unlucky?


Presuming you mean halogens - usually rated about 20% less
than the GLS equivalent, i.e 48W halogen for a 60W GLS?
They should last better and longer than a conventional bulb.
It is unlikely you have been unlucky assuming you are buying
a decent brand, so there are two options: either you have
very spikey mains, or you have poor quality light switches.
In terms of the latter, a halogen bulb has a relatively high
inrush current when first switched on. If your switch contacts
are old and/or bouncing (and possibly arcing) it can easily
blow such a bulb. Try changing one switch where bulbs regularly
fail for a good brand such as Crabtree or MK and see what happens.

-- Woody harrogate three at ntlworld dot com

Many thanks. That makes sense. The bulbs are in table lamps which
have been in use for ages.

It looks like I should get new lamps - or else go back to the spiral
flourescents.

Thanks again.
  #7  
Old January 21st 14, 11:47 PM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
Steve Thackery[_2_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 2,552
Default TOT Those new light bulbs.

Woody wrote:

It is unlikely you have been unlucky assuming you are buying a decent
brand, so there are two options: either you have very spikey mains,
or you have poor quality light switches.


Actually they are famously fragile, those halogens. Because the
filament is so short compared with the filament in a normal bulb, it
has to be ultra-thin to get the right resistance. That's why they are
so delicate.

For 12V applications the filaments are really tough because they are
thick. For 240V it's a different story.

I've read somewhere that it's mostly subtle vibrations from the floor
or ceiling that does them in, although I don't know for sure whether
that is correct.

The energy saving is so minimal it isn't worth using them, in my
opinion. LED lamps are becoming available now (B&Q, IKEA, online) and
I've got them in my table lamps and uplighters. Wonderful, so long as
you make sure they're "warm white" or 2700K.

--
SteveT
  #8  
Old January 22nd 14, 01:01 AM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
Michael Chare[_3_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 194
Default TOT Those new light bulbs.

On 21/01/2014 23:25, wrote:
On Tuesday, 21 January 2014 17:03:49 UTC, Woody wrote:
semiretired wrote


Apologies for raising this here, but I don't know
another forum where the topic might get taken seriously.
These new light bulbs - the ones with the little
bulb inside an old style casing - seem to blow
very quickly. They don't seem to last anything
like the promised coulple of years.
Or have I just been unlucky?


Presuming you mean halogens - usually rated about 20% less
than the GLS equivalent, i.e 48W halogen for a 60W GLS?
They should last better and longer than a conventional bulb.
It is unlikely you have been unlucky assuming you are buying
a decent brand, so there are two options: either you have
very spikey mains, or you have poor quality light switches.
In terms of the latter, a halogen bulb has a relatively high
inrush current when first switched on. If your switch contacts
are old and/or bouncing (and possibly arcing) it can easily
blow such a bulb. Try changing one switch where bulbs regularly
fail for a good brand such as Crabtree or MK and see what happens.

-- Woody harrogate three at ntlworld dot com

Many thanks. That makes sense. The bulbs are in table lamps which
have been in use for ages.

It looks like I should get new lamps - or else go back to the spiral
flourescents.

Thanks again.


I just bought an Integral LED mains light bulb from Amazon. It comes
with a 5 year warranty. If the table lamps have shades you won't see the
bulbs.

--
Michael Chare
  #9  
Old January 22nd 14, 09:17 AM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
Woody[_5_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 1,865
Default TOT Those new light bulbs.

"Steve Thackery" wrote in message
...
Woody wrote:

It is unlikely you have been unlucky assuming you are
buying a decent
brand, so there are two options: either you have very
spikey mains,
or you have poor quality light switches.


Actually they are famously fragile, those halogens.
Because the
filament is so short compared with the filament in a
normal bulb, it
has to be ultra-thin to get the right resistance. That's
why they are
so delicate.

For 12V applications the filaments are really tough
because they are
thick. For 240V it's a different story.

I've read somewhere that it's mostly subtle vibrations
from the floor
or ceiling that does them in, although I don't know for
sure whether
that is correct.

The energy saving is so minimal it isn't worth using them,
in my
opinion. LED lamps are becoming available now (B&Q, IKEA,
online) and
I've got them in my table lamps and uplighters.
Wonderful, so long as
you make sure they're "warm white" or 2700K.




Just hope that you have no AM listeners or radio amateurs
nearby as they create horrendous RFI and are known to
flicker in the presence of RF (they are diodes after all.)


--
Woody

harrogate three at ntlworld dot com


  #10  
Old January 22nd 14, 09:26 AM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
Steve Thackery[_2_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 2,552
Default TOT Those new light bulbs.

Woody wrote:

Just hope that you have no AM listeners or radio amateurs nearby as
they create horrendous RFI


Evidence? Or hearsay?

and are known to flicker in the presence
of RF (they are diodes after all.)


Don't understand that. Why would RF make them flicker? These things
run at 240V and several watts - what kind of RF would be required to
make one flicker? Naaah - doesn't sound realistic. Especially when I
tell you the next bit.....

I was reading an article about them in a techie mag recently (Elektor,
EPE? - can't remember). The power supply circuitry is unbelievably
simple: a capacitor and a full-wave rectifier, basically; little or
nothing else. So, nothing to produce any RF. This is completely
different from CFLs, which have a tiny SMPS inside them, so surely
*they* are the ones which will produce RF.

--
SteveT
 




Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

vB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Forum Jump


All times are GMT. The time now is 08:53 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.6.4
Copyright ©2000 - 2018, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.SEO by vBSEO 2.4.0
Copyright 2004-2018 Digital TV Banter.
The comments are property of their posters.