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uk.tech.digital-tv (Digital TV - General) (uk.tech.digital-tv) Discussion of all matters technical in origin related to the reception of digital television transmissions, be they via satellite, terrestrial or cable. Advertising is forbidden, with no exceptions.

TOT Those new light bulbs.



 
 
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  #31  
Old January 22nd 14, 05:11 PM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
Dave Saville[_2_]
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Posts: 143
Default TOT Those new light bulbs.

On Wed, 22 Jan 2014 11:45:39 UTC, "Steve Thackery"
wrote:

Roderick Stewart wrote:

This explains why they can now make the GU10 fitting LED lamps the
same physical size as the 50W filament ones, and thus suitable as
direct replacements, at last.


Yes. Apparently the biggest challenge has been managing the heat from
the LEDs so they don't exceed their rated temperature. Light output
per LED, efficiency and heat management are the main technical
challenges, I believe.


Does this mean it's a problem putting them in enclosed fittings? We
have several ceiling lights that are totally enclosed with 40W
tungsten in them. I seem to remember seeing a "Don't use in enclosed"
on some low energy buld but there does not seem to be anything on the
boxes of "40W" LEDs.

--
Regards
Dave Saville
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  #32  
Old January 22nd 14, 05:21 PM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
NY
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Posts: 1,329
Default TOT Those new light bulbs.

"Johny B Good" wrote in message
...
The lamps that do seem to have a very poor life are the larger spotlight
bulbs used as downlighters in a kitchen - the sort that have a standard
size
bayonet or Edison screw and are about 5" long by 3" diameter. Those seem
to
have a life of only a month or so - a lot shorter than conventional bulbs
of
the same power and similar size (ie not miniature halogens with very short
filiaments).


You didn't mention it but I'd guess you're talking about 240v
filament lamps.


Sorry, yes: the 240V 60W filament spotlights.

  #33  
Old January 22nd 14, 06:29 PM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
Roderick Stewart[_3_]
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Posts: 2,246
Default TOT Those new light bulbs.

On Wed, 22 Jan 2014 18:11:17 +0000 (UTC), "Dave Saville"
wrote:


Roderick Stewart wrote:

This explains why they can now make the GU10 fitting LED lamps the
same physical size as the 50W filament ones, and thus suitable as
direct replacements, at last.


Yes. Apparently the biggest challenge has been managing the heat from
the LEDs so they don't exceed their rated temperature. Light output
per LED, efficiency and heat management are the main technical
challenges, I believe.


Does this mean it's a problem putting them in enclosed fittings? We
have several ceiling lights that are totally enclosed with 40W
tungsten in them. I seem to remember seeing a "Don't use in enclosed"
on some low energy buld but there does not seem to be anything on the
boxes of "40W" LEDs.


I would guess that if an LED bulb is marked as "40W", what it really
means is "equivalent light output to a conventional 40W bulb", and the
bulb actually consumes not much more than a tenth of that. Therefore
it won't get anywhere near as hot. This, and the fact that these bulbs
are made in the same physical shapes and sizes as conventional
filament bulbs, and with the same electrical connections, suggests
they are intended to be used as direct replacements.

I've recently replaced ten 50W GU10 quartz halogens set into a kitchen
ceiling with LED equivalents, with no other modifications, so in about
five years time I'll be able to tell you if I'm right.

Rod.
  #34  
Old January 22nd 14, 08:24 PM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
Steve Thackery[_2_]
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Posts: 2,552
Default TOT Those new light bulbs.

Johny B Good wrote:

For anyone who can appreciate the aesthetics of 'function decides
form', a linear tubed fluorescent fitting wins the day every time.
CFLs and LED lamps simply can't compete on luminous output and
electrical efficiency.


And, just as importantly, they don't cast shadows. Thus they are
perfect for kitchens and workrooms.

--
SteveT
  #35  
Old January 22nd 14, 08:26 PM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
Steve Thackery[_2_]
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Posts: 2,552
Default TOT Those new light bulbs.

Roderick Stewart wrote:

I would guess that if an LED bulb is marked as "40W", what it really
means is "equivalent light output to a conventional 40W bulb", and the
bulb actually consumes not much more than a tenth of that.


Exactly. You can't buy 40 "real" watts LED lamps - not for domestic
use, I mean.

--
SteveT
  #36  
Old January 22nd 14, 09:58 PM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
Max Demian
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Posts: 3,970
Default TOT Those new light bulbs.

"Scion" wrote in message
...
Steve Thackery put finger to keyboard:

snip

All of the fluorescent strip lights in my house are now high
frequency electronic with instant start


Do you ever have a problem with them failing to start first time? I've got
4ft and 5ft twin tube HF fluoros in my kitchen and quite often one or both
of the 5ft ones don't light. When I switch it off the non-lit one will
give a bright flash about a second later. Really odd. Sometimes I'll need
to switch off and on six or seven times to get them both lit. As far as I
can tell it's not temperature or humidity related.


The CFL in my bathroom sometimes flashes when the fan switches off after
five minutes which is odd. I suppose it's due to some kind of inductive
surge.

And my bedroom has some kind of weird switch with a dial under a cover - I
think it may be an anti-burglary device - which doesn't like CFLs at all.
Most just flicker continuously when they're turned off.

--
Max Demian


  #37  
Old January 23rd 14, 07:17 AM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
PeterC
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Posts: 812
Default TOT Those new light bulbs.

On Wed, 22 Jan 2014 15:24:52 -0600, Steve Thackery wrote:

Johny B Good wrote:

For anyone who can appreciate the aesthetics of 'function decides
form', a linear tubed fluorescent fitting wins the day every time.
CFLs and LED lamps simply can't compete on luminous output and
electrical efficiency.


And, just as importantly, they don't cast shadows. Thus they are
perfect for kitchens and workrooms.


Indeed. A couple of years ago I replaced a single 20W CFL in the middle of a
small kitchen with 2 14W HF T5 tubes with diffusers (controllers, in the
lingo), switched independently and carefully sited to be of most use. They
come on instantly at full brightness and give a well-dispersed light of
about 2600 lumens.
At the far end of the kitchen there's a 3W, 250 lu LED golfball in a
batten-holder that is very good for some cupboards, the 'pantry' and the
back door. It stays on for about 7h per evening atm and is just luke warm.
It's enough for walking through, setting the microwave, filling the kettle
etc. and seems better than the 60W GLS (about 800+ lu) that was in there
before.
--
Peter.
The gods will stay away
whilst religions hold sway
  #38  
Old January 23rd 14, 01:21 PM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
Roderick Stewart[_3_]
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Posts: 2,246
Default TOT Those new light bulbs.

On Thu, 23 Jan 2014 09:35:12 +0000 (GMT), Bob Latham
wrote:

I've recently replaced ten 50W GU10 quartz halogens set into a kitchen
ceiling with LED equivalents, with no other modifications, so in about
five years time I'll be able to tell you if I'm right.


I have a '4 spotlights on a bar' type thing in my kitchen. Each light is a
GU10 50watt. I assume you found the replacement LEDS acceptable in
brightness, colour and beam angle. May I ask what they are and where from?


The lamps in the "4 spotlights on a bar" thing in my living room are
still the CFL type, because I managed to find a bar with adjustable
fittings that could take them, despite the fact that they're longer
than the quartz halogen type. (At the time I couldn't find a suitable
bar with 6 fittings).

The kitchen has ten GU10 lamps in flush fittings set into the ceiling.
CFL ones might have fitted the sockets but would have stuck out and
looked stupid. This is what I ended up buying, but there are lots of
others to choose from-

http://www.amazon.co.uk/gp/product/B...?ie=UTF8&psc=1

I'd suggest you make sure to get the ones described as "warm white",
or with a colour temperature around 3000K, because if not so described
they're likely to be the daylight ones around 6000K, which will look
very cold compared with traditional interior lighting.

Rod.
  #40  
Old January 26th 14, 07:04 AM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
[email protected]
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Posts: 61
Default TOT Those new light bulbs.

On Tuesday, 21 January 2014 14:05:50 UTC, James Harris wrote:
semiretired wrote


Apologies for raising this here, but I don't know
another forum where the topic might get taken seriously.
These new light bulbs - the ones with the little
bulb inside an old style casing - seem to blow
very quickly. They don't seem to last anything
like the promised coulple of years.


You could try uk.d-i-y. James


Thanks to you and to all posters on this thread.






 




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