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Pro's and cons of different tv types



 
 
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  #11  
Old April 21st 12, 11:22 AM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
Andy Burns[_7_]
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Default Pro's and cons of different tv types

David Woolley wrote:

Edge lit is orthogonal to the main screen technology.


Only orthogonal to the extent that some technologies (OLED) don't
require edge lighting.
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  #12  
Old April 21st 12, 11:30 AM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
David Woolley[_2_]
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Default Pro's and cons of different tv types

Andy Burns wrote:
David Woolley wrote:

Edge lit is orthogonal to the main screen technology.


Only orthogonal to the extent that some technologies (OLED) don't
require edge lighting.


If some technology naturally produces edge lighting, it is, to some
extent NOT orthogonal. However I would be rather surprised if that were
the case; it may be the case that all current OLED technology displays
also use edge lighting. If OLED is really the backlighting technology,
for an LCD screen, it may also the the case that the most efficient way
of operating it does.
  #13  
Old April 21st 12, 12:23 PM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
Java Jive[_2_]
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Default Pro's and cons of different tv types

On Sat, 21 Apr 2012 08:53:49 +0100, Hugh Newbury
wrote:

I'm thinking of getting a new tv, but I know nothing of the advantages
or otherwise of the various types: OLED, edge lit, plasma, etc.


It's perhaps getting a bit out of date, but is still a good starting
point:
http://www.macfh.co.uk/JavaJive/Audi.../ChooseTV.html

I have
googled, but can't find a site that explains the basics.


My site rankings are only just getting back to normal after my web
host forget to renew my domain a few months ago. Before Christmas the
above would probably have been on the first page, even though it is
about time I updated it (too busy with other things right now).
--
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Please always reply to ng as the email in this post's
header does not exist. Or use a contact address at:
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  #14  
Old April 21st 12, 12:28 PM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
tony sayer
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Default Pro's and cons of different tv types

In article , David
scribeth thus
Bet that gets some confusing answers.
For what its worth my brother who is very fussy about picture quality got
this deal from John Lewis this week.
http://www.johnlewis.com/231589058/Product.aspx
Regards
David


Good advice. We got a Bravia around a year ago does all we want and very
well to. Makes the best of the signals transmitted to it in HD as well.
None of the usual problems of grass "blocking" or backlight
breakthrough.


Very useful to connect direct to the web, has built in iplayer and
Youtube and more.

Sound like most all flat screen TV's is useless so allow a few bob for a
decent amp and speakers well worth doing or connect to your hi-fi

Only real grievance is the on screen keyboard for Youtube etc is very
slow to operate bit like sending a Text message.

Plasma is now going it out of date it could be good but its very power
hungry.



"Hugh Newbury" wrote in message ...

I'm thinking of getting a new tv, but I know nothing of the advantages
or otherwise of the various types: OLED, edge lit, plasma, etc. I have
googled, but can't find a site that explains the basics.

Any advice from you knowledgeable lot?

TIA

Hugh


--
Tony Sayer




  #15  
Old April 21st 12, 01:25 PM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
Steve Thackery[_2_]
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Posts: 2,552
Default Pro's and cons of different tv types

I've spent thousands trying to get a TV picture that was just right for
me.

Here's what I have found:


PLASMA SCREENS
===============

All plasma screens flicker (some more visibly than others - my Panny
was terrible). Most people can't see it. If you can't, then it's no
problem. I can see it, and it renders plasma TVs useless for me. Make
quite sure before you buy.

Taken on average across the TVs you can buy, plasma screens aren't as
bright as LCD screens.

Plasma screens are said to be more colour-accurate than LCDs.

Plasma screens are said to be better at handling fast-moving pictures,
as they don't suffer from the "smearing" LCDs are alleged to show.
Again, I haven't noticed that myself but I don't watch much sports.

If you don't mind the flicker and the slight dullness (compared with
LCD) then most would agree that plasma gives the better picture.


LCD SCREENS
===========

Backlight bleed is a major issue for every LCD screen you can buy (but
see the following paragraphs). If you like watching in the dark, you
WILL see it in the dark areas of the picture - a grey glow rather than
a rich black.

Dynamic backlighting is of little help - if a picture has a large
amount of dark in it, the overall backlighting intensity is lowered to
reduce visible bleed in the dark areas. It's hopeless because it also
dims the remaining bright bits. Also, you can often see the backlight
"pumping" as the picture content changes. It drove me mad.

Zoned backlighting is the only way to go for LCD if you're fussy. I do
not recommend the crude zoning offered by some manufacturers, whereby
the lights are around the edge of the screen and they can control (to
some extent) the brightness where the vertical and horizontal lights
intersect (typically eight zones, I seem to recall). I've watched it
carefully and it looks crap.

The best results come from "array" backlighting, whereby there is an
array of hundreds (or thousands) of LEDs behind the LCD screen. This
gives far tighter control over which parts of the screen are lit, and
eliminates bleed in the dark areas because those LEDs are switched off.

Almost. My 3.5k Sony has 128 backlight zones, which means some minor
"blooming" of the backlight is visible around small bright objects,
because the zones are much bigger than the individual pixels. However,
this is a tiny problem compared with the alternatives.

Until we get a backlight LED for every pixel, zoned backlighting will
not be perfect, but it is MILES better than any other approach for LCD
screens.


OLED
====

Not availabe in the size range I want (at least not unless I sell my
house to raise the cash).


OVERALL SUMMARY
===============

Choose plasma if:

a/ You want the most colour-perfect and nuanced picture, AND you don't
care about:

b/ the flicker;

c/ the slight dullness (compared with LCD);

d/ the weight;

e/ the power consumption.


Choose LCD if:

a/ You want a bright, engaging picture which is good for daytime
viewing, AND you don't care about:

b/ backlight bleed (noticeable when viewing in the dark)

c/ alleged smearing on fast moving sports programs (not visible to me)


Choose zoned backlit LCD if:

a/ You want a bright, engaging picture which has little or no bleed in
dark areas (thus is fine for both daylight and dark viewing), AND...

b/ you've got loads of money, AND you don't care about:

c/ alleged smearing on fast motion (not visible to me)


Choose OLED if:

a/ You want the ultimate picture quality regardless of price, AND...

b/ You've got shed loads of money; AND...

c/ you can live with a smallish screen.


Sorry for the length of this. Hopefully it will provide some food for
thought.

Other contributors have dealt with the other issues, such as cost,
weight, power consumption, etc.

--
SteveT


  #16  
Old April 21st 12, 01:36 PM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
Adrian
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Default Pro's and cons of different tv types

David wrote:
You mention Plasma using more power, but aren't they heavier as well,
maybe a 2 man lift ?
Regards
David


I have a 50" Plasma and can lift it easily. Why have you started top
posting?


--
Adrian
  #17  
Old April 21st 12, 02:41 PM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
John Legon
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Posts: 919
Default Pro's and cons of different tv types

Steve Thackery wrote:
LCD SCREENS
===========

Backlight bleed is a major issue for every LCD screen you can buy (but
see the following paragraphs). If you like watching in the dark, you
WILL see it in the dark areas of the picture - a grey glow rather than a
rich black.


I am not at all sure that this is still the case - at least with the
Samsung super-PVA LCD panel in my new 40" TV, I've been amazed by the
inky blackness of the blacks even with low ambient lighting. I don't
watch TV in total darkness, and I suppose if I did I might notice a hint
of grey, but in general the blacks appear to be as black as the piano
black surround. This is with a conventional back-lit display.

Of course the brightness control has to be set correctly so that the
black level is (just) fully black - and this wasn't the case with the
default setting for the HDMI inputs - but with proper adjustment I don't
see the need for elaborate zoned LED backlighting. A decent black makes
a huge difference to the perception of picture quality, and IMO it's not
something that really costs - not any more.

  #18  
Old April 21st 12, 02:45 PM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
David
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Default Pro's and cons of different tv types

I'm on MicroSoft Windows Live Mail and people complain that it not show the
marks.

Regards
David


"Adrian" wrote in message
om...

David wrote:
You mention Plasma using more power, but aren't they heavier as well,
maybe a 2 man lift ?
Regards
David


I have a 50" Plasma and can lift it easily. Why have you started top
posting?


--
Adrian

  #19  
Old April 21st 12, 03:35 PM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
David WE Roberts[_3_]
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Default Pro's and cons of different tv types


"Hugh Newbury" wrote in message
...
On 21/04/12 10:26, David WE Roberts wrote:

...


Where is it going?

Sittingroom
How big do you want it to be?

19"

snip
How many connections and what type?

SCART x 2

snip

Two things are immediately obvious:

(1) You are likely to be very limited in your choice of TVs if you insist on
a 19" size.
Has to be LCD because Plasma doesn't come that small.
A quick Google then search through Amazon brought up a load of "HD Ready"
TVs which are ones which do not do the full 1080p HD but fake it at a lower
resolution.
With these you also have to be very careful that they include a Freeview HD
tuner - TVs can be described as HD Ready if they can handle an HD signal
through the HDMI port.
Generally previous generation almost obsolete kit.
See
http://www.amazon.co.uk/Samsung-LE19.../ref=de_a_smtd
for one which looks quite reasonable.
Note however that it only has a single SCART socket and you want two.
"Resolution:HD Ready (1366 x 768)"

(2) Probably the only way to get a modern high resolution 19" screen is to
go for a PC monitor with HDMI input and use a Set Top Box as a TV tuner.
However that doesn't solve your requirement for two SCART inputs.

I read today in Which? (so it must be true) that manufacturers are stopping
making 32" screens and going for larger formats.
So you will either have to rethink your requirements or go for a
significantly larger screen.

Remember that 19" widescreen is significantly smaller than an old 19" 4:3
aspect ratio CRT TV because the corners are relatively further apart
compared to the height so a 19" corner to corner does not give you anywhere
near 19" high. I think thet the height will be somewhere around half.
Just measured my 42" TV and it is about 20" high - so your 19" screen will
be 9" or less vertically (which is a good size for a male member but not for
a TV unless you are really up close and personal).

Remeber also that the bottom end in price range and size will have limited
connectivity because they are built to a budget and also because there isn't
that much space on the case. Finding something small with two SCART sockets
may be a bit of a challenge.
My relatively old HD Ready Panasonic TX-32LMD70A has 2 SCART sockets but now
most AV kit is using HDMI manufacturers are cutting back on SCART support.

If you intend to wall mount, check where the connectors are!
My 42" plasma Panasonic P42G10B has most of the connectors on the back which
makes adding or reorganising leads quite interesting unless your eyes are on
long stalks.

Cheers

Dave R

--
No plan survives contact with the enemy.
[Not even bunny]

Helmuth von Moltke the Elder

(\__/)
(='.'=)
(")_(")

  #20  
Old April 21st 12, 03:55 PM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
Adrian
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Posts: 2,022
Default Pro's and cons of different tv types

David wrote:
I'm on MicroSoft Windows Live Mail and people complain that it not show
the marks.
Regards
David


So get a popper newsreader or end up in lots of killfiles.
--
Adrian
 




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