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OT Low Energy Light Bulb



 
 
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  #231  
Old March 25th 08, 01:30 PM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
Bill Wright
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Posts: 8,408
Default OT Low Energy Light Bulb


"Max Demian" wrote in message
...
"Bill Wright" wrote in message
...

"Max Demian" wrote in message
...
"Lord Turkey Cough" wrote in message
...
"Bill Wright" wrote in message
...
The only garments that are *only* likely to be exposed indoors are
undies


Don't you ever go dogging then?


Not in broad daylight. Call me old-fashioned.


Ah we,, it's when you're dogging under one of these modern sodium lights
that you're likely to suffer embarrassment. It can make your undies look a
very peculiar colour.

By the way, I was talking to a mate of mine the other day, and the
conversation turned to schooldays. We went to the same junior school but
different secondary schools until the 6th form, when we were together again.
He said that one thing that seemed odd about the secondary school when he
started was that there was a strict rule: no underpants under gym shorts. At
my secondary school however, there was strict rule: underpants must be worn
under gym shorts. At that point someone else arrived in the bar and he said
that at his school it was 'no underpants'. But the barman said 'compulsory
underpants'. Schoolteachers eh?


Bill


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  #232  
Old March 25th 08, 05:12 PM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
Max Demian
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Posts: 3,970
Default OT Low Energy Light Bulb

"Bill Wright" wrote in message
...

By the way, I was talking to a mate of mine the other day, and the
conversation turned to schooldays. We went to the same junior school but
different secondary schools until the 6th form, when we were together
again. He said that one thing that seemed odd about the secondary school
when he started was that there was a strict rule: no underpants under gym
shorts. At my secondary school however, there was strict rule: underpants
must be worn under gym shorts.


So you had to take them off to shower, then put them on again? Might you not
be tempted not to bother?

At that point someone else arrived in the bar and he said that at his
school it was 'no underpants'. But the barman said 'compulsory
underpants'. Schoolteachers eh?


We had to wear swimming trunks or a jockstrap under gym shorts at mine.

--
Max Demian


  #233  
Old March 25th 08, 06:18 PM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
Bill Wright
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 8,408
Default OT Low Energy Light Bulb


"Max Demian" wrote in message
...
"Bill Wright" wrote in message
...

By the way, I was talking to a mate of mine the other day, and the
conversation turned to schooldays. We went to the same junior school but
different secondary schools until the 6th form, when we were together
again. He said that one thing that seemed odd about the secondary school
when he started was that there was a strict rule: no underpants under gym
shorts. At my secondary school however, there was strict rule: underpants
must be worn under gym shorts.


So you had to take them off to shower, then put them on again? Might you
not be tempted not to bother?


We only showered at the end, and in fact we only showered after games, not
PE. And there were no showers at all for the first two years I was there.
The toilets were outdoor.

I think the underpants thing was because there was a girls' school next door
and they thought the lasses might get an eyeful if anyone had loose shorts!

Bill


  #234  
Old March 25th 08, 06:34 PM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
Low Life #3
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Posts: 99
Default OT Low Energy Light Bulb

"Bill Wright" wrote in message
...
:
: Ah we,, it's when you're dogging under one of these modern sodium lights
: that you're likely to suffer embarrassment. It can make your undies look a
: very peculiar colour.

in the mid-1960's, General Motors Corporation sold some of their premium
budged cars with a paint that looked quite odd under sodium lights. There
were just a few colors that reacted poorly with the sodium lights, but they
were spectacular.


  #235  
Old March 25th 08, 11:23 PM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
Dave Plowman (News)
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Posts: 5,342
Default OT Low Energy Light Bulb

In article ,
Low Life #3 wrote:
: Ah we,, it's when you're dogging under one of these modern sodium
: lights that you're likely to suffer embarrassment. It can make your
: undies look a very peculiar colour.


in the mid-1960's, General Motors Corporation sold some of their premium
budged cars with a paint that looked quite odd under sodium lights.
There were just a few colors that reacted poorly with the sodium
lights, but they were spectacular.


I had a Philips bike at school - deep red metallic and white. Very smart.
The red became black under those old sodium lights. Or rather it did to
me. It seems we all see different colours under narrow spectrum lighting.
As anyone who did a BBC engineering training course will probably remember.

--
*Never test the depth of the water with both feet.*

Dave Plowman London SW
To e-mail, change noise into sound.
  #236  
Old March 26th 08, 11:17 AM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
Java Jive
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Posts: 1,294
Default OT Low Energy Light Bulb

This is a well known physiological phenomenon, but while the colour of the
light may have had some effect in this particular situation, it was just
as, probably more, likely to be the *levels* of light.

Day time vision is largely achieved through the cone cells in your retina,
while night-time vision relies solely on the rods. Cones are more
sensitive to red light, and require a higher lighting threshold to work,
while rods are more sensitive to blue light and require a much lower
threshold.

Thus it is possible to choose something coloured both blue and red - for
me it was the cover of a book called, IMS, 'Essentials Of Astronomy' -
where under daylight or artifical light the red seems clearly brighter than
the blue, and you wonder how it could ever appear otherwise, but under
moonlight or starlight the situation is just as clearly reversed, and the
red is, indeed, black.

"Dave Plowman (News)" wrote in
:

I had a Philips bike at school - deep red metallic and white.
The red became black under those old sodium lights.


  #237  
Old March 26th 08, 03:30 PM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
Dave Plowman (News)
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 5,342
Default OT Low Energy Light Bulb

In article ,
Java Jive wrote:
This is a well known physiological phenomenon, but while the colour of
the light may have had some effect in this particular situation, it was
just as, probably more, likely to be the *levels* of light.


Not so with low pressure sodium. Paint shows its colour by reflecting
light of *that* colour. If the light source doesn't contain that 'colour'
the paint can't reflect it. It's a physical property.

--
*It doesn't take a genius to spot a goat in a flock of sheep *

Dave Plowman London SW
To e-mail, change noise into sound.
  #238  
Old March 26th 08, 03:51 PM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
charles
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Posts: 4,016
Default OT Low Energy Light Bulb

In article ,
Dave Plowman (News) wrote:
In article ,
Java Jive wrote:
This is a well known physiological phenomenon, but while the colour of
the light may have had some effect in this particular situation, it was
just as, probably more, likely to be the *levels* of light.


Not so with low pressure sodium. Paint shows its colour by reflecting
light of *that* colour. If the light source doesn't contain that 'colour'
the paint can't reflect it. It's a physical property.


as typified by red cars - so visible in daylight - going black under sodium
lighting. That's why, in the early '70s, I bought a yellow car.

--
From KT24 - in "Leafy Surrey"

Using a RISC OS computer running v5.11

  #239  
Old March 26th 08, 04:13 PM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
Java Jive
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 1,294
Default OT Low Energy Light Bulb

"Dave Plowman (News)" wrote in
:

In article ,
Java Jive wrote:
This is a well known physiological phenomenon, but while the colour of
the light may have had some effect in this particular situation, it was
just as, probably more, likely to be the *levels* of light.


Not so with low pressure sodium.


I have a 1st Class Hons in this sort of stuff. Indeed when at uni I even
did an experiment on the Sodium spectrum. Sodium lamps contain red
emission lines as well as yellow, less bright maybe, but they're there
alright - take a look at the spectra photos he

http://ioannis.virtualcomposer2000.c...mici.html#1nap

The phenomenom you saw has the explanation I gave. If you don't believe
me, you could at least try the experiment I suggested before dismissing it
as untrue.
 




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