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New Television



 
 
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  #1  
Old December 31st 07, 03:33 AM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
John[_6_]
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Posts: 8
Default New Television

I'm thinking of getting an LCD television in the sales. I just have a
couple of questions for those more in the know than me.

Full 1080 HD Televisions is there a certain size of screen that you
have to get or above for full HD, or can you get full HD in most
screen sizes? I didn't want to get something too big, maybe only a 26
or 32" screen size.

If I was to get a full HD screen, would I still be able to watch or
change the screen format to 720? Its just I watch a lot of sports and
I've heard that 720 HD is better for sports than full HD? I also watch
quite a lot of wildlife programs as well though were full HD would be
better for picture quality instead of motion.

Another question I have is regarding the connectors for TVs. What's
the difference between HDMI and DVI?

Do any televisions accept DV in from a miniDV camcorder? Or do you
have to connect via analogue audio/video inputs the yellow, red and
white cables?

Can most modern televisions work with NTSC input as well? E.g. NTSC
games console or NTSC camcorder?

For Brightness and Contrast values am I generally looking for higher
values as being better? So Contrast 3500:1 and Brightness 500 cd/m2
would be pretty good? Better than 1500:1 and 250 cd/m2?

When I am out looking at televisions, are there any types of labels so
you know whether it is full hd or 720 hd or not? And the television
that just say HD ready, what is this supposed to mean? That its a hd
tv or just that its a standard tv that can accept hd signals?!#

What television makes do you consider to be pretty good at the moment
for picture quality that don't cost too much? I don't think I could
afford a Loewe or a Sony as much as I would like one of them
Anything else worth considering or looking at?

Cheers and thanks for your advice

John


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  #2  
Old December 31st 07, 04:18 AM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
Ian[_2_]
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Posts: 8
Default New Television


"John" wrote in message
...
I'm thinking of getting an LCD television in the sales. I just have a
couple of questions for those more in the know than me.


You're best going to see the TVs in action, but ignore pushy sales people
and do not buy insurance policies or guarantees as they are ot worth it.
The TV is guaranteed for 12months so if it goes wrong it will be fixed.
Sales people will lie to get a bonus too.

If you want to watch sport then don't bother with LCD. Out of all the TVs I
looked at, the SAMSUNG range seemed best for showing moving objects without
"LCD smearing". Avoid anything featuring "XD engine" as they were rubbish,
the refresh rates were too slow for things like rivers, tennis, backgrounds
in moving shots etc.

Make sure the shop is not feeding the TV with a weak analogue signal to try
and hide LCD smearing.
The other trick is to turn the colour and contrast up a bit and show a slow
moving brightly coloured cartoon. People look and think, "oh that's good"
then go wild when they get home realising they have paid hundreds for a TV
that is miles behind CRT in terms of quality.

You might want to wait for the "OLED" and "SED" TVs coming out this year.
Think of them like a flat CRT. The quality is far superior to LCD and there
is no smearing or slow refresh rates. LCDs have come right down in price to
shift the stockpiles. TVs people are buying now were made years ago!
Prices will be high to start with to rip people off, but the wait will be
worth it.

Google for reviews on the TVs but make sure you're not reading shop reviews.
Some will be rating the quality of the box it arrived in or the time it
took!


  #3  
Old December 31st 07, 10:15 AM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
tony sayer
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Posts: 5,001
Default New Television

What television makes do you consider to be pretty good at the moment
for picture quality that don't cost too much?


Yep find a good second-hand CRT set;!...

I don't think I could
afford a Loewe or a Sony as much as I would like one of them


Well FWIW the transmitted picture quality doesn't justify spending that
much...


--
Tony Sayer

  #4  
Old December 31st 07, 10:39 AM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
Alan White
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Posts: 681
Default New Television

On Mon, 31 Dec 2007 03:33:01 +0000, John wrote:

...
Cheers and thanks for your advice


Whatever you get, make sure that you set it up properly.

1.Ensure that the set has been switched on for at least twenty
minutes.

2. Set all the 'fancy' picture options to 'Off' or 'Neutral'.

3. Reduce 'Colour', 'Contrast' and 'Brightness' to zero.
This should give a blank, black screen.

4. Slowly increase 'Brightness' until their is a just perceptible
lightening of the screen.

5. Slowly increase 'Contrast' until you have an acceptable black and
white picture. Some further small adjustment of 'Brightness' may be
necessary to achieve this.

6. If you have a 'Gamma' control slowly increase 'Gamma' until you
have sufficient amount of detail in the 'blacks'.

7. Make further small adjustments of 'Brightness' and 'Contrast' to
optimize the black and white picture.

8. Increase 'Colour' to achieve realistic flesh tones.

The important thing is to get a decent black and white picture and to
use a reliable(?) programme source.

--
Alan White
Mozilla Firefox and Forte Agent.
Twenty-eight miles NW of Glasgow, overlooking Lochs Long and Goil in Argyll, Scotland.
Webcam and weather:- http://windycroft.gt-britain.co.uk/weather
  #5  
Old December 31st 07, 11:01 AM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
Andy Burns[_2_]
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Posts: 138
Default New Television

On 31/12/2007 03:33, John wrote:

I'm thinking of getting an LCD television in the sales.


Do listen to the other comments about LCD picture quality.

Full 1080 HD Televisions is there a certain size of screen that you
have to get or above for full HD, or can you get full HD in most
screen sizes? I didn't want to get something too big, maybe only a 26
or 32" screen size.


You're very unlikely to get a Full HD under 32" screen.

If I was to get a full HD screen, would I still be able to watch or
change the screen format to 720?


Yes the 1080i/p sets will also display 720p, with relevant scaling.

Will you be paying Sky (or Virgin?) to receive HD sports programmes?
anything else will just be scaling up current programmes to fit HD, with
all the extra problems that brings.

Another question I have is regarding the connectors for TVs. What's
the difference between HDMI and DVI?


DVI is an older connection that does video only, HDMI incorporates sound
too and usually copy protection, you can get DVI-HDMI connectors.

And the television
that just say HD ready, what is this supposed to mean? That its a hd
tv or just that its a standard tv that can accept hd signals?!#


It can't receive HD programmes but it can display them when connected to
e.g. a HD satellite receiver, HD games console or HD-DVD/BluRay player.

  #6  
Old December 31st 07, 11:43 AM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
tony sayer
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Posts: 5,001
Default New Television

In article , Alan White
scribeth thus
On Mon, 31 Dec 2007 03:33:01 +0000, John wrote:

...
Cheers and thanks for your advice


Whatever you get, make sure that you set it up properly.

1.Ensure that the set has been switched on for at least twenty
minutes.

2. Set all the 'fancy' picture options to 'Off' or 'Neutral'.

3. Reduce 'Colour', 'Contrast' and 'Brightness' to zero.
This should give a blank, black screen.

4. Slowly increase 'Brightness' until their is a just perceptible
lightening of the screen.

5. Slowly increase 'Contrast' until you have an acceptable black and
white picture. Some further small adjustment of 'Brightness' may be
necessary to achieve this.

6. If you have a 'Gamma' control slowly increase 'Gamma' until you
have sufficient amount of detail in the 'blacks'.


Well sort of black more dirty grey..

7. Make further small adjustments of 'Brightness' and 'Contrast' to
optimize the black and white picture.

8. Increase 'Colour' to achieve realistic flesh tones.


What on digital?, theres only three at best;!..


The important thing is to get a decent black and white picture and to
use a reliable(?) programme source.

And then cringe at all the MPEG artefacts;!...
--
Tony Sayer


  #7  
Old December 31st 07, 12:37 PM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
Alan White
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Posts: 681
Default New Television

On Mon, 31 Dec 2007 11:43:46 +0000, tony sayer
wrote:

...
6. If you have a 'Gamma' control slowly increase 'Gamma' until you
have sufficient amount of detail in the 'blacks'.


Well sort of black more dirty grey..

7. Make further small adjustments of 'Brightness' and 'Contrast' to
optimize the black and white picture.

8. Increase 'Colour' to achieve realistic flesh tones.


What on digital?, theres only three at best;!..


The important thing is to get a decent black and white picture and to
use a reliable(?) programme source.

And then cringe at all the MPEG artefacts;!...


I don't see any of the things you describe. Is there something wrong
with my set ;-) ?

--
Alan White
Mozilla Firefox and Forte Agent.
Twenty-eight miles NW of Glasgow, overlooking Lochs Long and Goil in Argyll, Scotland.
Webcam and weather:- http://windycroft.gt-britain.co.uk/weather
  #8  
Old December 31st 07, 12:55 PM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
John[_6_]
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Posts: 8
Default New Television

On Mon, 31 Dec 2007 11:01:45 +0000, Andy Burns
wrote:

On 31/12/2007 03:33, John wrote:

I'm thinking of getting an LCD television in the sales.


Do listen to the other comments about LCD picture quality.

Full 1080 HD Televisions is there a certain size of screen that you
have to get or above for full HD, or can you get full HD in most
screen sizes? I didn't want to get something too big, maybe only a 26
or 32" screen size.


You're very unlikely to get a Full HD under 32" screen.

If I was to get a full HD screen, would I still be able to watch or
change the screen format to 720?


Yes the 1080i/p sets will also display 720p, with relevant scaling.

Will you be paying Sky (or Virgin?) to receive HD sports programmes?
anything else will just be scaling up current programmes to fit HD, with
all the extra problems that brings.


I have Sky. I don't have HD though. I don't even have Sky+ yet but
will be getting it soon now that it doesn't cost anything extra, and I
should be able to pick up a second hand box. Will probably get Sky HD
eventually but not for a couple of years. Will more than probably have
a HD Camcorder then Blu Ray player/recorder before I get any other HD
source item for tv.

What issues are there with standard def signals being upscaled on a HD
television? Is the picture quality effected greatly?

John


  #9  
Old December 31st 07, 01:20 PM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
Mark Carver
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Posts: 7,633
Default New Television

John wrote:

What issues are there with standard def signals being upscaled on a HD
television? Is the picture quality effected greatly?


I've not seen enough personally to say. However, HD channels run at a higher
bit rate than SD channels, so you'd reasonably expect upconverted SD material
transmitted at that rate to look better than it does on SD channels. Unless of
course the broadcasters reduce the bit rate when upscalled SD material is
being shown ?


--
Mark
Please replace invalid and invalid with gmx and net to reply.
  #10  
Old December 31st 07, 01:37 PM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
Pyriform
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Posts: 1,223
Default New Television

Ian wrote:
You might want to wait for the "OLED" and "SED" TVs coming out this
year. Think of them like a flat CRT. The quality is far superior to
LCD and there is no smearing or slow refresh rates. LCDs have come
right down in price to shift the stockpiles. TVs people are buying
now were made years ago! Prices will be high to start with to rip
people off, but the wait will be worth it.


Delusional conspiracy theory nonsense. SED TVs aren't coming out "this year"
(today?), or next year. They may not come out at all. OLED TVs already
exist, as long as you don't mind paying 1000 or so for an 11 inch screen.
They aren't going to suddenly get cheaper and bigger.

LCD TV prices are not being reduced to shift some vast imagined stockpile.
The TVs people are buying now were not (on the whole!) made "years ago".


 




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