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House of Horrors



 
 
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  #81  
Old June 4th 07, 02:13 PM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
Peter Thomas
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Posts: 20
Default House of Horrors

On Sun, 3 Jun 2007 09:25:00 +0100, (Peter
Hayes) wrote:

Max Demian wrote:

"buddenbrooks" wrote in message

"Prometheus" wrote in message
...
a 'protection' that would allow about 700 W to be dissipated under a
fault condition is no protection at all.


However the purpose of the fuse is to protect the cable to the
device not the device.


I thought it was to protect the ring main.

Does anyone know why we don't have fused sockets, rather than fused plugs?


How is the wall socket to know what's plugged into it? Your table lamp
needs at most a 3A fuse, your electric fire needs a 13A fuse. Or do you
want to revert back to 5A sockets and 15A sockets?


I have 5A sockets - they're part of the lighting cct - I can switch
standard/table lamps on from the wall switch - great!
--
Cheers

Peter
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  #82  
Old June 4th 07, 06:02 PM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
Max Demian
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Posts: 3,970
Default House of Horrors

"Peter Hayes" wrote in message
m
Max Demian wrote:

"buddenbrooks" wrote in message

"Prometheus" wrote in message
...
a 'protection' that would allow about 700 W to be dissipated
under a fault condition is no protection at all.


However the purpose of the fuse is to protect the cable to the
device not the device.


I thought it was to protect the ring main.

Does anyone know why we don't have fused sockets, rather than fused
plugs?


How is the wall socket to know what's plugged into it? Your table lamp
needs at most a 3A fuse, your electric fire needs a 13A fuse.


I doubt that they care. ;-)

--
Max Demian


  #83  
Old June 9th 07, 04:47 PM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
Bob
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Posts: 10
Default House of Horrors

Prometheus wrote in message ...

However the purpose of the fuse is to protect the cable to the
device not the device.


I thought it was to protect the ring main.


The ring main is rated at over 30A, hence it has a 30A fuse.


What is the maximum simultaneous load in an all-electric home ?

I'm thinking of a frosty Christmas morning, heaters on in every room,
turkey in the oven, kids taking a power-shower etc etc

I do realise that ovens and showers usually have dedicated fused spurs,
but on mornings like that the main distribution box must come close
to meltdown.




  #85  
Old June 10th 07, 11:09 AM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
Brian McIlwrath
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Posts: 783
Default House of Horrors

Bob wrote:

: I do realise that ovens and showers usually have dedicated fused spurs,
: but on mornings like that the main distribution box must come close
: to meltdown.

Normal houses (with single phase) have an 80A fuse before the meter - so
I guess thats also the maximum load for the distrubution board
  #86  
Old June 10th 07, 03:29 PM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
Lurch
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Posts: 133
Default House of Horrors

On Sun, 10 Jun 2007 11:09:07 +0000 (UTC), Brian McIlwrath
mused:

Bob wrote:

: I do realise that ovens and showers usually have dedicated fused spurs,
: but on mornings like that the main distribution box must come close
: to meltdown.

Normal houses (with single phase) have an 80A fuse before the meter - so
I guess thats also the maximum load for the distrubution board


Define normal. Most round here are 100A as we are on a fairly new
estate, the older the house the smaller the fuse, usually a 60 or 80A.
If you have a large load, like all electric space and water heating,
electric cooking etc... then you'd likely be having a 3 phase supply
installed.
--
Regards,
Stuart.
 




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