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TV in the bedroom: LCD or not?



 
 
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  #11  
Old December 26th 06, 11:15 AM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
tony sayer
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Posts: 5,001
Default TV in the bedroom: LCD or not?

In article , charles
writes
In article ,
harrogate3 wrote:

"gort" wrote in message
...

What is more the TV/digibox will likely still be working long after
the LCD had gone so 'soft' as to be unusable.

What does that mean ' gone soft '? please explain.

Dave


My experience of LCD screens over the years that they have been
available (and I don't mean just TVs) is that with time the crystals
get lazy and don't turn as much as they should or (more importantly)
as quickly so the picture starts to lack contrast and can also seem
'blurry.'


Never happens per se with a CRT.


No, because they use different technology. CRTs go soft as well. I've had
to change tubes in the past for that reason.


Yes but they do take much longer...
--
Tony Sayer

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  #12  
Old December 26th 06, 11:18 AM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
tony sayer
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 5,001
Default TV in the bedroom: LCD or not?

In article , tony sayer
writes
In article , charles
writes
In article ,
harrogate3 wrote:

"gort" wrote in message
...

What is more the TV/digibox will likely still be working long after
the LCD had gone so 'soft' as to be unusable.

What does that mean ' gone soft '? please explain.

Dave


My experience of LCD screens over the years that they have been
available (and I don't mean just TVs) is that with time the crystals
get lazy and don't turn as much as they should or (more importantly)
as quickly so the picture starts to lack contrast and can also seem
'blurry.'


Never happens per se with a CRT.


No, because they use different technology. CRTs go soft as well. I've had
to change tubes in the past for that reason.


Yes but they do take much longer...


Lest much longer.....
--
Tony Sayer

  #13  
Old December 26th 06, 03:40 PM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
Sylvain Van der Walde
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Posts: 95
Default TV in the bedroom: LCD or not?


"harrogate3" wrote in message
...

"gort" wrote in message
...

What is more the TV/digibox will likely still be working long

after
the LCD had gone so 'soft' as to be unusable.


What does that mean ' gone soft '? please explain.

Dave


My experience of LCD screens over the years that they have been
available (and I don't mean just TVs) is that with time the crystals
get lazy and don't turn as much as they should or (more importantly)
as quickly so the picture starts to lack contrast and can also seem
'blurry.'

That's what they used to say about LCD's several decades ago, and yet
they've gone from strength to strength. I've never experienced the problems
you mention with LCD watches and clocks. Many _expensive_ instruments use
such displays, and they wouldn't be used if they were unreliable. My blood
pressure monitor (for example) uses a LCD display, and I expect it to
display a sharp image for a _very_ long time. The same applies to my digital
cameras; they all have LCD displays. The best cameras (Canon, Nikon, etc...)
use such displays.

Sylvain.

Never happens per se with a CRT.




  #14  
Old December 26th 06, 04:26 PM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
Bill Wright
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Posts: 8,408
Default TV in the bedroom: LCD or not?


"harrogate3" wrote in message
news

It might have snob value to have a big modern telly in the lounge
where visitors can see it, but does it matter in the bedroom?


The boy might be eager to impress his bedroom visitors as well.

Bill


  #15  
Old December 26th 06, 05:20 PM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
harrogate3
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 219
Default TV in the bedroom: LCD or not?


"Bill Wright" wrote in message
...

"harrogate3" wrote in message
news

It might have snob value to have a big modern telly in the lounge
where visitors can see it, but does it matter in the bedroom?


The boy might be eager to impress his bedroom visitors as well.

Bill




Oops, missed that!


  #16  
Old December 26th 06, 08:47 PM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
Al Reynolds
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Posts: 9
Default TV in the bedroom: LCD or not?

"ian" wrote in message ...
SWMBO has declared that we need a new TV in the bedroom. Nothing flashy:
17"-ish flat screen, analog and built-in DTT, no cables, no recording.

Seems a straightforward requirement, but what about the screen? In the
back of my mind I have a notion that LCDs are prone to image burning. Is
this true? Should I avoid LCDs?

Any recommendations for a suitable set? Anything to avoid?


For my money the backlight is the big issue.

I had a Samsung SM940MW which apart from not being
16:9 had the problem that you couldn't turn the brightness
down properly. I now have a Samsung LE23T51B which
automatically lowers the backlight if the room is dark, and
raises it if the surroundings are bright. This is ideal for
bedroom use.

HTH, Al


  #17  
Old December 27th 06, 01:09 PM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
Gendy
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Posts: 56
Default TV in the bedroom: LCD or not?

The point about absolutely weedy sound from the thin-cased LCD/Plasma TV is
well made ..there is an undoubted advantage to the large-screen 28" +
LCD/Plamsa in that they are both considerably lighter and take up far less
room (in a modern micro-flat of today) ..the solution for bedrooms that I
have found to the sound problem is to purchase a computer - style 2:1
speaker system from PC World/Maplins and plug this into the audio-out RCA
type sockets on the back of the TV or the DTT converter box (Freeview).

There is usually a very healthy sound output up to 40watts RMS and the
woofer makes all the difference to the superb sound from digital sources.

Who misses the rear speakers anyway?This solution is certainly a fraction of
the cost of an over-priced Dolby 5:1 kit...and far more practical for the
boudoir!

Fortunately I do not any longer have a SWMBO and while I have to cook,clean
,wash & iron for myself the financial advantages are enormous and at past
60 ..the "other" is barely missed.Ho..ho..ho

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  #18  
Old December 27th 06, 02:08 PM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
John Porcella
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Posts: 1,632
Default TV in the bedroom: LCD or not?


"ian" wrote in message ...
SWMBO has declared that we need a new TV in the bedroom.


Surely she should be so occupied in bed with other activities not to have
time for TV!


--
MESSAGE ENDS.
John Porcella


  #19  
Old December 27th 06, 09:27 PM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
Simon Slavin
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Posts: 457
Default TV in the bedroom: LCD or not?

On 25/12/2006, ian wrote in message :

SWMBO has declared that we need a new TV in the bedroom. Nothing flashy:
17"-ish flat screen, analog and built-in DTT, no cables, no recording.

Seems a straightforward requirement, but what about the screen? In the
back of my mind I have a notion that LCDs are prone to image burning. Is
this true?


It's not like the old days. LCDs will get burn-in only if you leave them
showing the same picture for days on end. And even if that happens it
will burn back out again if you just use the TV as normal, showing
continuously varying pictures that don't look like the one that's burned
in. It's really not much of a problem any more, unlike the situation with
Plasma displays.

Should I avoid LCDs?


No. Given your requirements, an LCD TV seems to be a very good solution.

Simon.
--
http://www.hearsay.demon.co.uk
  #20  
Old December 28th 06, 11:44 AM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
Ian
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 59
Default TV in the bedroom: LCD or not?

In message , ian writes
SWMBO has declared that we need a new TV in the bedroom. Nothing
flashy: 17"-ish flat screen, analog and built-in DTT, no cables, no
recording.

Seems a straightforward requirement, but what about the screen? In the
back of my mind I have a notion that LCDs are prone to image burning.
Is this true? Should I avoid LCDs?

Any recommendations for a suitable set? Anything to avoid?


OP here. Thanks for all the suggestions.

Another question: I went to one of the sheds yesterday and saw all
shapes and sizes of LCD TVs. However, despite looking very carefully,
not one of them mentioned being "digital". How do I know if they have a
built-in digital decoder, or can I assume they all do nowadays?

--
Ian
 




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