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uk.tech.digital-tv (Digital TV - General) (uk.tech.digital-tv) Discussion of all matters technical in origin related to the reception of digital television transmissions, be they via satellite, terrestrial or cable. Advertising is forbidden, with no exceptions.

Early Colour Television



 
 
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  #21  
Old December 23rd 06, 08:13 AM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
charles
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Posts: 4,016
Default Early Colour Television

In article ,
Rob wrote:
No, the first programme on BBC2 was Jackanory at 10.30 in the morning.
************************************************** ******


Try Play School!


OK, I knew it was a children's programme - but I didn't come on shift that
day till 1pm.

The problem with the power failure was that the beer in the club was warm.
the chillers didn't work. (We had to wait somewhere for the power to come
back ;-) )

--
From KT24 - in "Leafy Surrey"

Using a RISC OS computer running v5.11

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  #22  
Old December 23rd 06, 08:15 AM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
charles
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Posts: 4,016
Default Early Colour Television

In article ,
Jim Lesurf wrote:
In article , charles
wrote:
In article , Stephen
Peterson wrote:
Can anyone remember the early colour TV tests that the BBC and ITV
did? The BBC used 405 line NTSC whilst ITV used 625 SECAM!


Not quite. The original BBC tests, from 1956 to 1962, used 405 NTSC
from an existing transmitter. From Sept 1962 they were on 625 uhf and
in 1963, they were on all 3 standards in conjunction with the IBA .


tests started after closedown in the afternoons, and usually had a
film (Shell or GPO as was! )


The after closedown ones were on 405. The 625 ones were normally during
the working day.


I have memories of watching 'colour test transmissions' on our old 405
line vhf TV during that late 50's or early 60's. These would have been
during the daytime - similar times to the schools and technical college
educational programmes. I think they were on the BBC. Would this have
been the 'NTSC' BBC tests you describe above? I lived in London at the
time.


Most likely. I caught a glimpse of the last one when I started at TV in
Nov '62. It was an OB from London Zoo's humming bird house.

--
From KT24 - in "Leafy Surrey"

Using a RISC OS computer running v5.11

  #23  
Old December 23rd 06, 08:17 AM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
charles
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Posts: 4,016
Default Early Colour Television

In article ,
Mark Carver wrote:
Bill Wright wrote:
This correspondence has cheered me up enormously. I reckon I'm one of
the youngest in this group.


Who's Benny Hill ?


the fastest milkman in the west? ;-)

--
From KT24 - in "Leafy Surrey"

Using a RISC OS computer running v5.11

  #24  
Old December 23rd 06, 08:26 AM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
Mark Carver
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Posts: 7,633
Default Early Colour Television

charles wrote:
In article ,
Mark Carver wrote:
Bill Wright wrote:
This correspondence has cheered me up enormously. I reckon I'm one of
the youngest in this group.


Who's Benny Hill ?


the fastest milkman in the west? ;-)


I spent a week in hospital in 1972. The children's ward I was in had a
radiogram and only one record; that one.


--
Mark
Please replace invalid and invalid with gmx and net to reply.
  #25  
Old December 23rd 06, 09:15 AM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
Max Demian
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Posts: 3,970
Default Early Colour Television

"Kennedy McEwen" wrote in message
news
In article , charles
writes
In article ,
Stephen Peterson wrote:


They even did the 53 Coronation on one colour camera as a test - he
should know - he operated it!


This is unlikely to have been on NTSC since the system wasn't
released until 3 months before the Coronation and it wasn't until
'54 that a 405 version existed.

The 1953 Coronation route were filmed in a prototype field sequential
colour system by The Marconi Company. This was a 405-line system and
broadcast by the BBC to a limited number of suitable receivers in the
Home Counties. The cameras were designed and built in Chelmsford -
Writtle Road, I believe - using RCA tubes, although the source of my
information (one of the system designers) died several years ago.

I wonder how they recorded the output? Video Tape didn't appear
until 1958

Marconi also had a system similar to "telecine in reverse", which
passed film in front of a CRT with only horizontal line drive and
this was used to "record" TV images. I cannot confirm if that was
used on the Coronation, however I have seen still colour photos of
the image on screen.


The normal b/w television broadcast was transferred to film and flown over
to Canada for broadcast (in time for their daytime). I don't know whether
the film still exists - I imagine when they show b/w film clips of the event
they take them from the colour cine film.

--
Max Demian


  #26  
Old December 23rd 06, 09:18 AM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
Dave Plowman (News)
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Posts: 5,342
Default Early Colour Television

In article ,
Mark Carver wrote:
Who's Benny Hill ?


the fastest milkman in the west? ;-)


I spent a week in hospital in 1972. The children's ward I was in had a
radiogram and only one record; that one.


Well, who would steal it?

--
*No hand signals. Driver on Viagra*

Dave Plowman London SW
To e-mail, change noise into sound.
  #27  
Old December 23rd 06, 09:19 AM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
Dave Farrance
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Posts: 1,551
Default Early Colour Television

Kennedy McEwen wrote:

Marconi also had a system similar to "telecine in reverse", which passed
film in front of a CRT with only horizontal line drive and this was used
to "record" TV images. I cannot confirm if that was used on the
Coronation, however I have seen still colour photos of the image on
screen.


Would it recorded to film at 50 fps, and be played back later at that
speed on TV? Or would it deinterlace? I can envisage a deinterlacing
system that had two horizontal lines on the CRT, one for each field,
positioned just right so that one filled in the gaps in the other as the
film passed up the screen.

--
Dave Farrance
  #28  
Old December 23rd 06, 09:26 AM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
mike
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Posts: 19
Default Early Colour Television

charles wrote in
:


(But we _did_ start BBC2!)



No, the first programme on BBC2 was Jackanory at 10.30 in the morning.
You're thinking of the power failure in West London in the evening.

No, that's the company line, but it's not the truth.

Shift 2 at AP was there.

We ran news bulletins, and brought in the OB's; the BBC2 network was on
air, and programme switching was done from AP CAR by Dave Millen and me,
and I think Julian using double enders.

The
bbc airbrushed that evening like a Communist state adjusting history -
nevertheless, it happened

mike
  #29  
Old December 23rd 06, 09:34 AM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
Dave Farrance
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 1,551
Default Early Colour Television

"Stephen" wrote:

I read somewhere on the net that there were some CBS colour TV cameras at
the 1953 Coronation, which had been brought over specially from America to
demonstrate the capabilities of the CBS colour system, although the pictures
were not broadcast. This would have been the CBS field sequential colour
system, with 405 lines but 144 fields per second, and a rotating colour
filter wheel in each camera and TV monitor.


Invented by Logie Baird, IIRC. A contraption with large spinning wheels
is the sort of thing that you might expect Baird to invent, of course.
You probably had to feed coal in the back to keep the steam up.

As for shadowmasks, it always seemed to me that they were an
"impossible" invention for that time period, with about a million
perfect little holes aligned just so with the phosphor dots.

--
Dave Farrance
  #30  
Old December 23rd 06, 10:38 AM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
charles
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 4,016
Default Early Colour Television

In article ,
mike wrote:
charles wrote in
:



(But we _did_ start BBC2!)



No, the first programme on BBC2 was Jackanory at 10.30 in the morning.
You're thinking of the power failure in West London in the evening.

No, that's the company line, but it's not the truth.


Shift 2 at AP was there.


We ran news bulletins, and brought in the OB's; the BBC2 network was on
air, and programme switching was done from AP CAR by Dave Millen and me,
and I think Julian using double enders.


The
bbc airbrushed that evening like a Communist state adjusting history -
nevertheless, it happened


I'm not denying something went out from AP in the evening, not that we
could see it at TC. However the opening programme was a childrens' one in
the morning before the blackout.

I'm pretty certain that the scheduled OB of fireworks from Southend was
postponed and Kiss Me Kate from VT was shown the next night. As for "BBC2
Network" - it was only CP! Panorama (BBC1) was moved (by taxi) from Lime
Grove to AP

I usually see Dave once a month at the "Network Meet".

--
From KT24 - in "Leafy Surrey"

Using a RISC OS computer running v5.11

 




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