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uk.tech.digital-tv (Digital TV - General) (uk.tech.digital-tv) Discussion of all matters technical in origin related to the reception of digital television transmissions, be they via satellite, terrestrial or cable. Advertising is forbidden, with no exceptions.

Television is dead!



 
 
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  #31  
Old December 24th 06, 02:55 PM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
Jim Lesurf
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Posts: 787
Default Television is dead!

In article , tony sayer



Not that there is anymore .. about the last indie TV repairer shuts up
shop on the 31st Dec as they can no longer make repairs pay people these
days will just go out and buy new while the scrap pile gets bigger at
the recycling site....


I am slightly surprised that there isn't already a EU directive compelling
manufacturers to ensure that what they sell has to be repairable at a
reasonable cost within a lifetime from sale of, say, five years. Or
alternatively, to show that the level of reliability would make this
unnecessary.

Although I suppose that might then mean 'repaired back at the factory'
rather than by a more local and independently competing person.

I'd also love to see an EU directive requiring that service manuals/data
*had* to be avaliable to any purchaser at reasonable cost. :-) My
impression is that one of the deterrents to general electronic repair is
the way modern makers tend to regard such data as being commercially
sensitive and a way of controlling repair work. I have wondered if this
might be a restraint of trade.

At present, my impression is that large companies make it difficult for
purchasers to contact them about repairs and assume that you will buy a
'new' item - presumably secure in the feeling that the responsibility is
nominally with the shop, not them, so far as the purchaser is concerned.
Thus sending one more item to the scrap pile rather than a possibly minor
repair or adjustment.

Be interesting to see what effects the rules requiring manufacturers to
dispose of old items will have on this area... :-)

Slainte,

Jim

--
Electronics http://www.st-and.ac.uk/~www_pa/Scot...o/electron.htm
Audio Misc http://www.st-and.demon.co.uk/AudioMisc/index.html
Armstrong Audio http://www.st-and.demon.co.uk/Audio/armstrong.html
Barbirolli Soc. http://www.st-and.demon.co.uk/JBSoc/JBSoc.html
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  #32  
Old December 24th 06, 03:12 PM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
Ivan
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Posts: 1,055
Default Television is dead!

kim wrote:
"Alan Pemberton" wrote in
message
erve.co.uk.invalid...
charles wrote:

In article ,
kim wrote:
"Rob" wrote in message
...
I am sad to report that Television Mag has closed! Unbelievable
but apparently true as I have now heard it from several different
sources. Subscribers will receive a proportional refund.

This mag started as a suplement to Practical Television in what
was it, 1929?

I think you mean "started as a suplement to Practical Wireless"?

I started reading it in the late 1960's. My school physics class
had a few copies from the 1950's lying around which I "borrowed".
They were in the smaller A5 format.

A5 didn't exist in the 50s. The size was nearer quarto.


trivia class="sad"

A5 = 148 x 210mm
Quarto = 162 x 203mm
PTV April 1969 = 155 x 230mm

The size increased to 184 x 246mm in April 1969 (Vol 19 no 7 issue
223) and to its present 212 x 296mm in July 1975 (Vol 25 no 9 issue
297). 'Practical' was dropped from the title in October 1970 (Vol 21
no 1 issue 241).


That's interesting. It means I started buying regularly just after the
change to the larger format. It was around the time colour was
impossibly expensive for most people. There was a series of articles
on converting a monochrome TV to colour using a mechanical flywheel
with coloured filters. I think it was wishful thinking on the part of
the author. I doubt whether it was actually built for real. Wireless
World carried a details of a similar project by a team or researchers
at a Polytechnic using a more sophisticated colour wheel which did
work but the end result was hardly worth the effort.


A friend took once took me to the Bristol home of a Polish technical wizard
he knew, who had built one of these contraptions (from the Wireless World).

The receiver in question was a converted 14 inch monochrome GEC,
unfortunately we couldn't view it for more than a few minutes at a time
because of the really annoying flicker it produced, however we've both had
to agree that the actual picture quality was superb.

If only we'd adopted a 150 fps system... ;o)


(kim)



  #33  
Old December 24th 06, 03:42 PM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
kim
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Posts: 637
Default Television is dead!

"Graham" wrote in message
...

I remember articles about CRT rejuvenation and converting 405-line sets
to
625-line operation. "Recycling" you could call it.

(kim)


I converted a Bush TV53 for BBC2 in the late 60's


I only ever read the articles, I never attempted it myself. The figures just
didn't add up. I had a few ex-rental "convertible" sets lying around but
they all needed major repairs. In the end I paid for them to be taken away.
You could rent a new 625-line receiver in those days for just ten bob a
week. There was just one guy in the street who had the conversion done. That
still left him with 17" tube which was so round it was like looking through
a ship's porthole. The women of the house used to pile into the front room
to watch Coronation Street on this tiny screen in the corner, standing room
only. You couldn't always see the character who was talking if they were
slightly off to one side or the other.

(kim)


  #34  
Old December 24th 06, 06:14 PM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
Max Demian
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Posts: 3,970
Default Television is dead!

"kim" wrote in message


That's interesting. It means I started buying regularly just after the
change to the larger format. It was around the time colour was
impossibly expensive for most people. There was a series of articles
on converting a monochrome TV to colour using a mechanical flywheel
with coloured filters. I think it was wishful thinking on the part of
the author. I doubt whether it was actually built for real. Wireless
World carried a details of a similar project by a team or researchers
at a Polytechnic using a more sophisticated colour wheel which did
work but the end result was hardly worth the effort.


What about the self adhesive "colour screens" you used to be able to buy,
that were blue at the top, green at the bottom, and merging into a kind of
orange in the middle?

--
Max Demian


  #35  
Old December 30th 06, 03:13 PM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
Laurence Taylor
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Posts: 67
Default Television is dead!

Rob wrote:
I am sad to report that Television Mag has closed! Unbelievable but
apparently true as I have now heard it from several different sources.
Subscribers will receive a proportional refund.

This mag started as a suplement to Practical Television in what was it,
1929?

Truly, as someone who has appeared on the front cover, a sad day!


What a pity. I hope someone can come up with a replacement.


--

rgds
LAurence

....If you see an onion ring - answer it!
---*TagZilla 0.059* http://tagzilla.mozdev.org
  #36  
Old December 30th 06, 03:51 PM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
charles
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Posts: 4,016
Default Television is dead!

In article ,
Laurence Taylor wrote:
Rob wrote:
I am sad to report that Television Mag has closed! Unbelievable but
apparently true as I have now heard it from several different sources.
Subscribers will receive a proportional refund.

This mag started as a suplement to Practical Television in what was it,
1929?

Truly, as someone who has appeared on the front cover, a sad day!


What a pity. I hope someone can come up with a replacement.


Surely PT was a sister publication to RW (both known as Camm's Comics).
Television was its new name after it changed ownership in ISTR late '80s.
It was an odd name to choose since the Royal Television Society's magazine
used the title already.

--
From KT24 - in "Leafy Surrey"

Using a RISC OS computer running v5.11

 




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