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A bit of a botch



 
 
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  #1  
Old November 21st 06, 02:30 AM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
Bill Wright
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 8,408
Default A bit of a botch

The following is an informal report send by me today to a property manager,
regarding an almost new TV distribution system. I think you'll agree that
the standards of the installer were nothing less than tragic.
----------------------
The faults I found today on the distribution system at xxxxxxxx were as
follows:
1. The TV aerial is a wideband type when it should be a Channel Group B
type. Wideband aerials are less sensitive and directional that grouped ones.
In view of the reception conditions at this location this is significant.
Analogue pictures have visible ghosting that would be greatly reduced by the
use of a better aerial.
2. The cable from the aerial is taped to the mast at intervals of approx
750mm. The maximum distance between tape fixings should be 300mm.
3. There is no terrestrial TV amplifier, either at the masthead or at the
head end. The signals from the aerial are weak; the cables are long; and the
polarity switcher reduces the strength of the signal a little. The end
result is that the signals available at each outlet are 10 to 15dB lower
than the minimum. This means that terrestrial analogue reception is very
snowy and terrestrial digital reception varies from highly unreliable to
non-existent.
4. The 70cm satellite dish is fixed to the mast of the TV aerial. The mast
is a 2" diameter, 1.6mm tube wall, aluminium one. This type of mast is
neither rigid nor strong enough for a satellite dish of this size when the
latter is mounted this far above the brackets that support the mast. The
mast is able to flex enough for satellite reception to be severely affected
when the wind blows. Left alone the installation will fail completely
because the mast will eventually bend in a gale.
5. The mast is fixed to the masonry using two 13" cradle-type chimney
brackets. The brackets are secured to the masonry by means of a proprietary
plastic strapping system. In my opinion this sort of fixing is not adequate
for an installation of this type, although I accept that the manufacturers
might differ. However, what is unarguable is the fact that the plastic
straps have frayed at the corners of the masonry structure to the extent
that their strength must be greatly reduced. There is a clear danger of
failure here.
6. At some places where the straps go round the corners of the masonry they
are in the mortar joint rather than on the brick. The mortar is in very poor
condition. This means that the strap can come loose by working its way
further into the joint. The abrasion from the bricks might rub through the
strap. The straps might force the masonry apart. The height of the mast and
the presence of the dish mean that in windy weather the tugging on the
strapping will be quite strong.
7. Each of the two cradle brackets is designed to hold a mast using two U
bolts. In this case each bracket only has one U bolt. The fact that two
brackets have been used does not make this alright, because with only one U
bolt the force of the wind translates into a twisting movement of the
bracket. The top bracket has already come loose and can be pulled from the
masonry surface about 15mm by the force of one hand.
8. The connections to the satellite LNB (dish electronics unit) have been
protected by rubber covers rather than self-amalgamating tape. These covers
are probably the wrong size for the plugs because they have slipped down to
varying extents, allowing moisture ingress.
9. The polarity offset adjustment was wrong by approximately 30 degrees.
10. The dish was not aligned correctly. It was loose in fact. The following
bolts were loose. The lower U bolt that holds the dish to the mast. The bolt
that sets the dish elevation. The lower bolt that hold the LNB arm. The dish
is an unbranded one and appears to be extremely flimsy. Even with everything
tightened up it does not inspire confidence.
11. The cables from the dish hung in a loop rather than being secured to the
dish mount and mast.
12.The cables from the dish and aerial to the head-end run down the side
wall of the building externally. The cable fixings are extremely scanty. The
cable are loose near the bottom of the run. It is very bad practice to run
cables externally when there is a convenient service duct inside the
building in the stairway.
13. The head end comprises nothing but a polarity switcher unit. See
http://www.triax.co.uk/Products/System%20Distribution%20Products/5%20Input%20TMS%20Multiswitch%20Range.aspx?product Id={5657F1A8-1232-4D60-B23D-300D3B97AC73}&Tab=0
There are no channel filters, amplifiers, etc. The cables are unsecured.
There is no earth bonding rail or earth bonding connection. There is no
earth connection via the power cord. The installation is electrically
dangerous.

In order to restore satellite reception we have taken the following
measures, which can only be regarded as temporary. We have re-aligned the
dish (and tightened all the bolts), fitted an extra U bolt, fixed the dish
cable to the dish mount, and re-set the polarity offset. It is not possible
to lower the dish on the mast (at its present location) because to do so
would allow part of the building to obstruct the signal.

The attached photographs show some of the defects as found. Bear in mind
when looking at them that the frayed plastic strapping is the only thing
holding this large installation aloft.

If you need a quotation for the work necessary to make the system reliable
and safe please let me know.

Regards

Bill
----------------------
Comments, anyone? Is it me? Or is my trade infested by thick stupid
couldn't-give-a-toss criminally incompetent halfwit ****bags?


Ads
  #2  
Old November 21st 06, 03:02 AM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
Bill
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 346
Default A bit of a botch

In message , Bill Wright
writes


my trade infested by thick stupid
couldn't-give-a-toss criminally incompetent halfwit ****bags?


If that is how you describe some one who does " A bit of a botch" how do
you describe someone who really mucks up?


NO Don't tell us here!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!






A bit like a PMR base that I went to look at in Slough a while back, N
type plugs at each end of a run of UR67 that did not have the pins
soldered and, Bill will understand this one only too well I'm sure, the
rawl bolts were ALL into the mortar rather than the brick. The pole was
already 10 degrees or so from the vertical as the top fixing was rapidly
leaving the wall behind.




--
Bill
  #3  
Old November 21st 06, 06:09 AM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
Ian
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 1,707
Default A bit of a botch

In message , Bill Wright
writes
The following is an informal report send by me today to a property manager,
regarding an almost new TV distribution system. I think you'll agree that
the standards of the installer were nothing less than tragic.
----------------------
The faults I found today on the distribution system at xxxxxxxx were as
follows:
1. The TV aerial is a wideband type when it should be a Channel Group B
type. Wideband aerials are less sensitive and directional that grouped ones.
In view of the reception conditions at this location this is significant.
Analogue pictures have visible ghosting that would be greatly reduced by the
use of a better aerial.
2. The cable from the aerial is taped to the mast at intervals of approx
750mm. The maximum distance between tape fixings should be 300mm.
3. There is no terrestrial TV amplifier, either at the masthead or at the
head end. The signals from the aerial are weak; the cables are long; and the
polarity switcher reduces the strength of the signal a little. The end
result is that the signals available at each outlet are 10 to 15dB lower
than the minimum. This means that terrestrial analogue reception is very
snowy and terrestrial digital reception varies from highly unreliable to
non-existent.
4. The 70cm satellite dish is fixed to the mast of the TV aerial. The mast
is a 2" diameter, 1.6mm tube wall, aluminium one. This type of mast is
neither rigid nor strong enough for a satellite dish of this size when the
latter is mounted this far above the brackets that support the mast. The
mast is able to flex enough for satellite reception to be severely affected
when the wind blows. Left alone the installation will fail completely
because the mast will eventually bend in a gale.
5. The mast is fixed to the masonry using two 13" cradle-type chimney
brackets. The brackets are secured to the masonry by means of a proprietary
plastic strapping system. In my opinion this sort of fixing is not adequate
for an installation of this type, although I accept that the manufacturers
might differ. However, what is unarguable is the fact that the plastic
straps have frayed at the corners of the masonry structure to the extent
that their strength must be greatly reduced. There is a clear danger of
failure here.
6. At some places where the straps go round the corners of the masonry they
are in the mortar joint rather than on the brick. The mortar is in very poor
condition. This means that the strap can come loose by working its way
further into the joint. The abrasion from the bricks might rub through the
strap. The straps might force the masonry apart. The height of the mast and
the presence of the dish mean that in windy weather the tugging on the
strapping will be quite strong.
7. Each of the two cradle brackets is designed to hold a mast using two U
bolts. In this case each bracket only has one U bolt. The fact that two
brackets have been used does not make this alright, because with only one U
bolt the force of the wind translates into a twisting movement of the
bracket. The top bracket has already come loose and can be pulled from the
masonry surface about 15mm by the force of one hand.
8. The connections to the satellite LNB (dish electronics unit) have been
protected by rubber covers rather than self-amalgamating tape. These covers
are probably the wrong size for the plugs because they have slipped down to
varying extents, allowing moisture ingress.
9. The polarity offset adjustment was wrong by approximately 30 degrees.
10. The dish was not aligned correctly. It was loose in fact. The following
bolts were loose. The lower U bolt that holds the dish to the mast. The bolt
that sets the dish elevation. The lower bolt that hold the LNB arm. The dish
is an unbranded one and appears to be extremely flimsy. Even with everything
tightened up it does not inspire confidence.
11. The cables from the dish hung in a loop rather than being secured to the
dish mount and mast.
12.The cables from the dish and aerial to the head-end run down the side
wall of the building externally. The cable fixings are extremely scanty. The
cable are loose near the bottom of the run. It is very bad practice to run
cables externally when there is a convenient service duct inside the
building in the stairway.
13. The head end comprises nothing but a polarity switcher unit. See
http://www.triax.co.uk/Products/Syst...roducts/5%20In
put%20TMS%20Multiswitch%20Range.aspx?productId={5 657F1A8-1232-4D60-B23D-
300D3B97AC73}&Tab=0
There are no channel filters, amplifiers, etc. The cables are unsecured.
There is no earth bonding rail or earth bonding connection. There is no
earth connection via the power cord. The installation is electrically
dangerous.

In order to restore satellite reception we have taken the following
measures, which can only be regarded as temporary. We have re-aligned the
dish (and tightened all the bolts), fitted an extra U bolt, fixed the dish
cable to the dish mount, and re-set the polarity offset. It is not possible
to lower the dish on the mast (at its present location) because to do so
would allow part of the building to obstruct the signal.

The attached photographs show some of the defects as found. Bear in mind
when looking at them that the frayed plastic strapping is the only thing
holding this large installation aloft.

If you need a quotation for the work necessary to make the system reliable
and safe please let me know.

Regards

Bill
----------------------
Comments, anyone? Is it me? Or is my trade infested by thick stupid
couldn't-give-a-toss criminally incompetent halfwit ****bags?


Erm, I think it's all trades.
--
Ian
  #4  
Old November 21st 06, 07:38 AM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
Dave Fawthrop
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 615
Default A bit of a botch

On Tue, 21 Nov 2006 02:30:25 -0000, "Bill Wright"
wrote:


|8. The connections to the satellite LNB (dish electronics unit) have been
|protected by rubber covers rather than self-amalgamating tape. These covers
|are probably the wrong size for the plugs because they have slipped down to
|varying extents, allowing moisture ingress.

Thanks for that I always considered them crap, on no evidence.

|9. The polarity offset adjustment was wrong by approximately 30 degrees.

So how does one align for polarity adjustment?
are LNBs pre adjusted or do they need to be fitted at an angle?

--
Dave Fawthrop dave hyphenologist co uk Google Groups is IME the *worst*
method of accessing usenet. GG subscribers would be well advised get a
newsreader, say Agent, and a newsserver, say news.individual.net. These
will allow them: to see only *new* posts, a killfile, and other goodies.
  #5  
Old November 21st 06, 07:41 AM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
Dave Fawthrop
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 615
Default A bit of a botch

On Tue, 21 Nov 2006 06:09:09 +0000, Ian wrote:

|In message , Bill Wright
writes

|----------------------
|Comments, anyone? Is it me? Or is my trade infested by thick stupid
|couldn't-give-a-toss criminally incompetent halfwit ****bags?
|
|
|Erm, I think it's all trades.

Bring back the old 4-5 year apprenticeships.
Good old English Electric taught me how to do things *right*
--
Dave Fawthrop dave hyphenologist co uk Google Groups is IME the *worst*
method of accessing usenet. GG subscribers would be well advised get a
newsreader, say Agent, and a newsserver, say news.individual.net. These
will allow them: to see only *new* posts, a killfile, and other goodies.
  #6  
Old November 21st 06, 08:35 AM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
Paul D.Smith
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 1,070
Default A bit of a botch

Bring back the old 4-5 year apprenticeships.

Communism may have a lot to answer for, but there's a reason that Polish
plumbers and builders typically do a very good job (the answer is in the
line above).

Paul DS


  #7  
Old November 21st 06, 08:48 AM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
Andy Burns
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 202
Default A bit of a botch

Bill Wright wrote:

The attached photographs show some of the defects as found. Bear in mind
when looking at them that the frayed plastic strapping is the only thing
holding this large installation aloft.


Can that one make it to rogue's gallery (or elsewhere) please?
  #8  
Old November 21st 06, 09:45 AM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
charles
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 4,016
Default A bit of a botch

In article ,
Bill wrote:
In message , Bill Wright
writes



my trade infested by thick stupid
couldn't-give-a-toss criminally incompetent halfwit ****bags?


If that is how you describe some one who does " A bit of a botch" how do
you describe someone who really mucks up?



NO Don't tell us here!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!







A bit like a PMR base that I went to look at in Slough a while back, N
type plugs at each end of a run of UR67 that did not have the pins
soldered and, Bill will understand this one only too well I'm sure, the
rawl bolts were ALL into the mortar rather than the brick.


but it's much easier to drill into mortar ;-(

--
From KT24 - in "Leafy Surrey"

Using a RISC OS computer running v5.11

  #9  
Old November 21st 06, 10:01 AM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
tony sayer
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 5,001
Default A bit of a botch

If you need a quotation for the work necessary to make the system reliable
and safe please let me know.

Regards

Bill
----------------------
Comments, anyone? Is it me? Or is my trade infested by thick stupid
couldn't-give-a-toss criminally incompetent halfwit ****bags?


Yes.. Mind you other trades are sometimes the same, its just that
aerials up where they are out of reach and sometimes unseen and the lack
of knowledge by the public and the lack of any sort of qualification
system ,and sometimes the need by the consumer to have something done as
cheap as possible...

Any wonder?......
--
Tony Sayer

  #10  
Old November 21st 06, 10:04 AM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
tony sayer
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 5,001
Default A bit of a botch

In article , Dave Fawthrop
writes
On Tue, 21 Nov 2006 06:09:09 +0000, Ian wrote:

|In message , Bill Wright
writes

|----------------------
|Comments, anyone? Is it me? Or is my trade infested by thick stupid
|couldn't-give-a-toss criminally incompetent halfwit ****bags?
|
|
|Erm, I think it's all trades.

Bring back the old 4-5 year apprenticeships.


Your right there. But it costs to teach someone and these days of
"competitive quotes" who would you go for if you wanted some building
work done?.

The firm that takes on apprentices or the self employed blokes who don't
have any "dependants" to support?...

Good old English Electric taught me how to do things *right*


--
Tony Sayer

 




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