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  #11  
Old October 10th 17, 06:48 PM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
Davey
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On Tue, 10 Oct 2017 17:37:52 +0100
"Brian Gaff" wrote:

I have heard that Subtitles appear on Sony Movies or can be selected
as the program guide tells me they can.
Brian


How is that supposed to work, then? How are they selectable other than
by the TV/PVR's normal option button?

--
Davey.
  #12  
Old October 10th 17, 07:32 PM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
Max Demian
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Posts: 3,860
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On 10/10/2017 18:48, Davey wrote:
On Tue, 10 Oct 2017 17:37:52 +0100
"Brian Gaff" wrote:

I have heard that Subtitles appear on Sony Movies or can be selected
as the program guide tells me they can.


How is that supposed to work, then? How are they selectable other than
by the TV/PVR's normal option button?


[s] in the programme description of the EPG.

--
Max Demian
  #13  
Old October 10th 17, 10:37 PM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
[email protected]
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Posts: 205
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On Tuesday, 10 October 2017 17:43:39 UTC+1, Brian Gaff wrote:
How can they say about market share, it depends on the market you are
talking about. On most main stations these channels exist only the smaller
ones it does not, and what about freesat?


I don't think it matters whether it's Freeview, Freesat or Sky, or whether the channel is 'available' - what counts is overall viewer share.

However according to
http://www.barb.co.uk/viewing-data/m...-summary/?_s=4

Sony Movies and Movies +1 had 0.51% viewer share (and that may be an over-estimate as other BARB figures cited elsewhere are about 0.04%).

Owain



  #14  
Old October 11th 17, 10:39 AM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
Brian Gaff
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Posts: 6,958
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Yes but then like other movie channels they repeat the same movies quite
often at different times, which means that its like comparing apples with
oranges.
I just wonder how on earth they really know. The obviously have little idea
what people really want since most of the programming of late seems to be
universally seen as crap.

I cringe at a lot of the rubbish, and there are now so many repeats and
stuff from the US that should never have been made that you begin to wonder
if the whole thing has not simply become a pointless attempt to sell
advertising that nobody watches in any case.
Brian

--
----- -
This newsgroup posting comes to you directly from...
The Sofa of Brian Gaff...

Blind user, so no pictures please!
wrote in message
...
On Tuesday, 10 October 2017 17:43:39 UTC+1, Brian Gaff wrote:
How can they say about market share, it depends on the market you are
talking about. On most main stations these channels exist only the
smaller
ones it does not, and what about freesat?


I don't think it matters whether it's Freeview, Freesat or Sky, or whether
the channel is 'available' - what counts is overall viewer share.

However according to
http://www.barb.co.uk/viewing-data/m...-summary/?_s=4

Sony Movies and Movies +1 had 0.51% viewer share (and that may be an
over-estimate as other BARB figures cited elsewhere are about 0.04%).

Owain





  #15  
Old October 11th 17, 01:41 PM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
Roderick Stewart[_3_]
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Posts: 2,180
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Every other BBC programme these days seems to have break points for
adverts, with the usual repetition of the programme title and the
story so far, i.e. since the last break point five minutes previously.
My experience with whittling the adverts out of recorded ITV
programmes suggests that without all the extra guff, the actual
running time of relevant material could be 25-30% shorter. Presumably
this is done with overseas sales in mind, but whatever happened to the
idea that BBC programmes were made with BBC licence payers' money for
BBC audiences? Shouldn't our interests come first?

Rod.

On Wed, 11 Oct 2017 15:00:53 +0200, Martin wrote:

Most of the stuff on BBC One and Two should never have been made, never mind
repeated over and over again. Which BBC twit had the idea to cut up Coast into 5
second segments, splice them together almost randomly in places and then present
the result as a new series. It doesn;t matter how many times they say in each
episode that it is a new series., it is just a series of badly edited repeats.

On Wed, 11 Oct 2017 10:39:38 +0100, "Brian Gaff"
wrote:

Yes but then like other movie channels they repeat the same movies quite
often at different times, which means that its like comparing apples with
oranges.
I just wonder how on earth they really know. The obviously have little idea
what people really want since most of the programming of late seems to be
universally seen as crap.

I cringe at a lot of the rubbish, and there are now so many repeats and
stuff from the US that should never have been made that you begin to wonder
if the whole thing has not simply become a pointless attempt to sell
advertising that nobody watches in any case.
Brian

  #16  
Old October 11th 17, 04:29 PM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
Brian Gaff
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Posts: 6,958
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Yes its for all those who fell asleep on the originals, specially crafted
for those with tiny attention spans.
Idealin fact for the goldfish.

Then I'm getting increasingly worried about audiences in program, OK I've
been to recordings of tv shows in my tiime and they do ramp things up out
of sight and get extra loud people in to whistle etc, but to me, listening
only it now seems so overcooked that its almost embarrassing to hear it
Mind you th Strictly come dnacin is really really over the top,but then I
suppose it at least can be funny if you can see it to some degree.
The bake offs and sundry other programs like it are just mind numbingly
boring.




Brian

--
----- -
This newsgroup posting comes to you directly from...
The Sofa of Brian Gaff...

Blind user, so no pictures please!
"Martin" wrote in message
...
Most of the stuff on BBC One and Two should never have been made, never
mind
repeated over and over again. Which BBC twit had the idea to cut up Coast
into 5
second segments, splice them together almost randomly in places and then
present
the result as a new series. It doesn;t matter how many times they say in
each
episode that it is a new series., it is just a series of badly edited
repeats.

On Wed, 11 Oct 2017 10:39:38 +0100, "Brian Gaff"

wrote:

Yes but then like other movie channels they repeat the same movies quite
often at different times, which means that its like comparing apples with
oranges.
I just wonder how on earth they really know. The obviously have little
idea
what people really want since most of the programming of late seems to be
universally seen as crap.

I cringe at a lot of the rubbish, and there are now so many repeats and
stuff from the US that should never have been made that you begin to
wonder
if the whole thing has not simply become a pointless attempt to sell
advertising that nobody watches in any case.
Brian

--

Martin in Zuid Holland





  #17  
Old October 11th 17, 04:33 PM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
Brian Gaff
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Posts: 6,958
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The last series made for us was New tricks if you look at the running time
on other channels of the repeats its normally a very odd number of minutes
as they do cut them but not every one allows enough cutting to be tidy in
the right time with adverts. Sinc then we nearly always get sequences of
landscapes of scenes not really iinportant that the commercial lot simply
ditch.
I've noticed this in Murdur in Paradise particularly.
Also programmes like wonders of the Universe have plenty of Bryan Cox
walking staring at things they can cut out to get their ads in.
Brian

--
----- -
This newsgroup posting comes to you directly from...
The Sofa of Brian Gaff...

Blind user, so no pictures please!
"Roderick Stewart" wrote in message
...
Every other BBC programme these days seems to have break points for
adverts, with the usual repetition of the programme title and the
story so far, i.e. since the last break point five minutes previously.
My experience with whittling the adverts out of recorded ITV
programmes suggests that without all the extra guff, the actual
running time of relevant material could be 25-30% shorter. Presumably
this is done with overseas sales in mind, but whatever happened to the
idea that BBC programmes were made with BBC licence payers' money for
BBC audiences? Shouldn't our interests come first?

Rod.

On Wed, 11 Oct 2017 15:00:53 +0200, Martin wrote:

Most of the stuff on BBC One and Two should never have been made, never
mind
repeated over and over again. Which BBC twit had the idea to cut up Coast
into 5
second segments, splice them together almost randomly in places and then
present
the result as a new series. It doesn;t matter how many times they say in
each
episode that it is a new series., it is just a series of badly edited
repeats.

On Wed, 11 Oct 2017 10:39:38 +0100, "Brian Gaff"

wrote:

Yes but then like other movie channels they repeat the same movies quite
often at different times, which means that its like comparing apples with
oranges.
I just wonder how on earth they really know. The obviously have little
idea
what people really want since most of the programming of late seems to be
universally seen as crap.

I cringe at a lot of the rubbish, and there are now so many repeats and
stuff from the US that should never have been made that you begin to
wonder
if the whole thing has not simply become a pointless attempt to sell
advertising that nobody watches in any case.
Brian



  #18  
Old October 11th 17, 04:39 PM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
Brian Gaff
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Posts: 6,958
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Hmm, well I notice that for a small amount of dosh the itv hub will now let
you see series with no adverts. Another issue I've come across is that when
CSI and its ilk are put out during the day or early evening a lot of the
gore is cut and this results in a screening with no AD as it seems to get
the chop when their do the editing. I was in fact told this by a drone at Ch
5 some years ago. the extra editing to get the ad to agree on the cuts was
not feasible to do.


I did notice a pilot idea on a Canadian radio station on the internet of
putting out AD soundtracks of the tv series as a radio programme. it worked
quite well for me even though it was a comedy and I did not get some of the
references to Canadian things exactly.

Brian

--
----- -
This newsgroup posting comes to you directly from...
The Sofa of Brian Gaff...

Blind user, so no pictures please!
"Martin" wrote in message
...
On Wed, 11 Oct 2017 13:41:29 +0100, Roderick Stewart
wrote:

Every other BBC programme these days seems to have break points for
adverts, with the usual repetition of the programme title and the
story so far, i.e. since the last break point five minutes previously.
My experience with whittling the adverts out of recorded ITV
programmes suggests that without all the extra guff, the actual
running time of relevant material could be 25-30% shorter. Presumably
this is done with overseas sales in mind, but whatever happened to the
idea that BBC programmes were made with BBC licence payers' money for
BBC audiences? Shouldn't our interests come first?


IMO yes. If you cut out the useless resume of what happened in the
previous
episode what will happen in the next episode you could reduce the time by
even
more. why is some of the better repeated material on channels like W and
Dave

Mark Kermode apparently said if you clap your hands every time a shot
changes
viewpoint making a noise like enthusiastic applause you are watching
something
modern as taught in media courses, otherwise you are watching a quality
old
film. The "NEW" Coast series has a clap rate of 1 per 5 seconds. Blade
runner
2049 has a very, very low clap rate like the original Blade Runner, but
what do
they know? :-)
--

Martin in Zuid Holland





  #19  
Old October 11th 17, 04:56 PM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
Peter Duncanson
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Posts: 4,230
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The question whether licence payers' interests should come first might
seem straightforward, but is not so simple. If a programme is earning
money from overseas sales it needs less licence money spending on it.
I think, for instance, that in the Jeremy Clarkson days Top Gear was
making a profit from overseas sales and therefore no licence money was
being spent on it.

On Wed, 11 Oct 2017 13:41:29 +0100, Roderick Stewart
wrote:

Every other BBC programme these days seems to have break points for
adverts, with the usual repetition of the programme title and the
story so far, i.e. since the last break point five minutes previously.
My experience with whittling the adverts out of recorded ITV
programmes suggests that without all the extra guff, the actual
running time of relevant material could be 25-30% shorter. Presumably
this is done with overseas sales in mind, but whatever happened to the
idea that BBC programmes were made with BBC licence payers' money for
BBC audiences? Shouldn't our interests come first?

Rod.

On Wed, 11 Oct 2017 15:00:53 +0200, Martin wrote:

Most of the stuff on BBC One and Two should never have been made, never mind
repeated over and over again. Which BBC twit had the idea to cut up Coast into 5
second segments, splice them together almost randomly in places and then present
the result as a new series. It doesn;t matter how many times they say in each
episode that it is a new series., it is just a series of badly edited repeats.

On Wed, 11 Oct 2017 10:39:38 +0100, "Brian Gaff"
wrote:

Yes but then like other movie channels they repeat the same movies quite
often at different times, which means that its like comparing apples with
oranges.
I just wonder how on earth they really know. The obviously have little idea
what people really want since most of the programming of late seems to be
universally seen as crap.

I cringe at a lot of the rubbish, and there are now so many repeats and
stuff from the US that should never have been made that you begin to wonder
if the whole thing has not simply become a pointless attempt to sell
advertising that nobody watches in any case.
Brian


--
Peter Duncanson
(in uk.tech.digital-tv)
  #20  
Old October 11th 17, 05:47 PM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
NY
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Posts: 1,232
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"Martin" wrote in message
...
Mark Kermode apparently said if you clap your hands every time a shot
changes
viewpoint making a noise like enthusiastic applause you are watching
something
modern as taught in media courses, otherwise you are watching a quality
old
film. The "NEW" Coast series has a clap rate of 1 per 5 seconds. Blade
runner
2049 has a very, very low clap rate like the original Blade Runner, but
what do
they know? :-)


I watched the Cornwall episode of Coast the other day and it was certainly
very disorganised. Tessa Dunlop linked together various items from the
archives by making a boat trip from Fowey to somewhere between the Lizard
and Lands End. That would have worked well if all the items had been places
that she visited or passed by in the boat, but no, she kept saying
(effectively) "we're going to place X, a bit further round the south coast,
but let's see what Neil Oliver had to say about place Y on the north coast".
There was something very wrong with the logic of those Tessa Dunlop links.
Tessa's not bad to look at, though, even if she isn't quite up to the appeal
of Alice Roberts :-)

 




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