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OT the telephone network



 
 
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  #31  
Old September 25th 17, 01:03 PM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
MR
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 26
Default OT the telephone network

On Saturday, 23 September 2017 19:41:40 UTC+1, wrote:
Does anyone know where I can find a map showing where all the phone
lines go; the routes from the exchanges to the premises and/or the
streetboxes?

Is there a UK newsgroup that discusses such things?

Bill


IIRC from a visit to reading telephone exchange in the late 70s when I was doing my electrical engineering degree the wires are all pink and unnumbered.


  #32  
Old September 25th 17, 01:55 PM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
R. Mark Clayton[_2_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 541
Default OT the telephone network

On Monday, 25 September 2017 13:03:03 UTC+1, MR wrote:
On Saturday, 23 September 2017 19:41:40 UTC+1, wrote:
Does anyone know where I can find a map showing where all the phone
lines go; the routes from the exchanges to the premises and/or the
streetboxes?

Is there a UK newsgroup that discusses such things?

Bill


IIRC from a visit to reading telephone exchange in the late 70s when I was doing my electrical engineering degree the wires are all pink and unnumbered.


In large cables they were all coloured (using resistor colour codes) and twisted together in pairs, so every pair could be uniquely identified. So using ten colours you would get 55 pairs [if my maths is still OK].
  #33  
Old September 25th 17, 03:40 PM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
Andy Burns[_12_]
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Posts: 439
Default OT the telephone network

R. Mark Clayton wrote:

In large cables they were all coloured (using resistor colour codes)
and twisted together in pairs, so every pair could be uniquely
identified.

Not quite (for telecoms cables at least) the usual domestic extension
colours of

white/blue
white/orange
white/green
white/brown

commonly seen in 4 pair cables, continues with

white/grey

which you don't normally see in domestic installs, then the common
colour changes

red/blue
red/orange
red/green
red/brown
red/grey

and again with

black, yellow, violet as the common colour

which takes you up to 25 pairs at which point you get a coloured "leader
tape" around the bundles of 25 pairs, the leaders follow the same
sequence white, red, black, yellow, violet

above that I think you get a two coloured leader around the bundles,
following the same sequence white/blue, white/orange etc.

  #34  
Old September 25th 17, 05:02 PM posted to uk.d-i-y,uk.tech.digital-tv
Rod Speed
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 392
Default OT the telephone network



"Dave W" wrote in message
news

"Rod Speed" wrote in message
...


"Dave W" wrote in message
news

"Rod Speed" wrote in message
...


"Dave W" wrote in message
news
"Rod Speed" wrote in message
...


"Dave W" wrote in message
news
"Rod Speed" wrote in message
...


"alan_m" wrote in message
...
On 23/09/2017 22:58, Dave Liquorice wrote:
Exchange locations
are a POP to find.

Samknows will give the exchange position and as the crow flies
distance from it as well as the telephone services/broadband
carried but no routing/cabinets details.

https://availability.samknows.com/br...xchange_search

We can get the full street cabling detail, and the other services
like
the water pipes, gas pipes, sewer lines etc for anywhere in the
country.

So?

So we do it better than you fools.

So?

Record's stuck, stupid.


It's time you started an Australian D-I-Y group instead of boasting on
this UK one.


We've got one, **** all traffic.

Here it is regarded as bad manners for foreigners to tell us their own
country is so much better than ours, however true that may be.


You donít get any say what so ever on what is
bad manners, and it wasnít boasting either, ****wit.


You have never started a thread here.


Wrong, as always.

None of your posts have been helpful


Wrong, as always.

all the rest of your **** any 2 year old could leave for dead flushed where
it belongs


  #35  
Old September 25th 17, 05:42 PM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
MR
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 26
Default OT the telephone network

On Monday, 25 September 2017 13:55:33 UTC+1, R. Mark Clayton wrote:
On Monday, 25 September 2017 13:03:03 UTC+1, MR wrote:
On Saturday, 23 September 2017 19:41:40 UTC+1, wrote:
Does anyone know where I can find a map showing where all the phone
lines go; the routes from the exchanges to the premises and/or the
streetboxes?

Is there a UK newsgroup that discusses such things?

Bill


IIRC from a visit to reading telephone exchange in the late 70s when I was doing my electrical engineering degree the wires are all pink and unnumbered.


In large cables they were all coloured (using resistor colour codes) and twisted together in pairs, so every pair could be uniquely identified. So using ten colours you would get 55 pairs [if my maths is still OK].


These weren't multicore cables but equipment wire, all pink. Presumably all electromechanical switching in those days.


..

  #36  
Old September 25th 17, 05:50 PM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
Woody[_5_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 1,797
Default OT the telephone network


"MR" wrote in message
...
On Monday, 25 September 2017 13:55:33 UTC+1, R. Mark Clayton wrote:
On Monday, 25 September 2017 13:03:03 UTC+1, MR wrote:
On Saturday, 23 September 2017 19:41:40 UTC+1,
wrote:
Does anyone know where I can find a map showing where all the
phone
lines go; the routes from the exchanges to the premises and/or
the
streetboxes?

Is there a UK newsgroup that discusses such things?

Bill

IIRC from a visit to reading telephone exchange in the late 70s
when I was doing my electrical engineering degree the wires are
all pink and unnumbered.


In large cables they were all coloured (using resistor colour
codes) and twisted together in pairs, so every pair could be
uniquely identified. So using ten colours you would get 55 pairs
[if my maths is still OK].


These weren't multicore cables but equipment wire, all pink.
Presumably all electromechanical switching in those days.


.


I think you are talking about jumper cables used to link one set of
connections to another set - e.g. the incoming and outgoing sides of a
street cab.

Nowadays they are usually blue and yellow twisted pair.


--
Woody

harrogate3 at ntlworld dot com


  #38  
Old September 26th 17, 09:50 AM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
Roderick Stewart[_3_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 2,171
Default OT the telephone network

On Mon, 25 Sep 2017 15:40:47 +0100, Andy Burns
wrote:

In large cables they were all coloured (using resistor colour codes)
and twisted together in pairs, so every pair could be uniquely
identified.

Not quite (for telecoms cables at least) the usual domestic extension
colours of

white/blue
white/orange
white/green
white/brown

commonly seen in 4 pair cables, continues with

white/grey


Officially-

GPO Primary colours: Blue, Orange, Green, Brown, Slate. (Acronym
"bogbrush")

Secondary colours: White, Red, and I can't remember the rest but there
are five of them.

At first, solid primaries are paired with each solid secondary in
turn, giving 25 combinations. Then each colour can be used with a
"tracer" or stripe of any of the other colours. I can't remember the
order in which they're used, but this gives effectively another 20
primary colours and another 20 secondary colours, so a total of up to
another 400 combinations in addition to the 25 using solid colours.

This is why the Ishihara test was included in BBC job interviews.

Rod.
  #39  
Old September 26th 17, 11:36 AM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
Alan White[_3_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 82
Default OT the telephone network

On Tue, 26 Sep 2017 09:50:00 +0100, Roderick Stewart
wrote:

White, Red, and I can't remember the rest but there
are five of them.


White, red, black, yellow, violet.

--
Alan White
Mozilla Firefox and Forte Agent.
In Helensburgh, Scotland.
Webcam and weather:- http://windycroft.co.uk/weather
 




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