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uk.tech.digital-tv (Digital TV - General) (uk.tech.digital-tv) Discussion of all matters technical in origin related to the reception of digital television transmissions, be they via satellite, terrestrial or cable. Advertising is forbidden, with no exceptions.

Samsung TV's "bricked"



 
 
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  #21  
Old August 25th 17, 10:39 PM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
Indy Jess John
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Posts: 1,218
Default Samsung TV's "bricked"

On 25/08/2017 20:15, Huge wrote:
On 2017-08-25, wrote:


De-Beechingise the railway.


Why? Much of what Beeching did was a good idea at the time. In 1961 the
railways were losing £300,000 a day.


That could have been improved by timetabling change, adjustment to
freight rates so that short trains cost more, and increases in fares on
oversubscribed routes.

Such answers were not likely to happen when Beeching's Terms of
Reference were masterminded by the Minister of Transport who was named
Marples and who ran a company which built roads.

Jim
  #22  
Old August 26th 17, 09:12 AM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
Paul Ratcliffe
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Posts: 2,465
Default Samsung TV's "bricked"

On Fri, 25 Aug 2017 17:46:31 +0100, Alan White
wrote:

We're moving into a new house next week


You said that a few months ago...
  #23  
Old August 26th 17, 11:02 AM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
Brian Gaff
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Posts: 6,879
Default Samsung TV's "bricked"

The drivers will be allowed to steer apparently, just not control the speed.
The saving only works if the space between the trucks is closer than a
humans reaction times can control them. Many years ago, VW demonstrated this
with cars on their test tracks and its been going on in America for years.
the problem with lots of trailers, land trains as the Ausies call them is
that going around a corner needs a lot more room than there is in most
junctions. land trains in the Aussie sense go for miles and miles down
almost straight roads in the outback.
Somebody suggested that this is a completely stupid thing to do here
though. Reason were.
You still need drivers for the last part of the journey in towns and in
junctions. So where is the saving?
Also they have already invented city to city mass bulk transport. its
called a railway.

Points made I feel. It seems to me that unless you have many hours of
straight or almost straight driving the fuel savings by slipstreaming in
this way will be minimal compared to the fuel used in towns.
Brian

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"Alan White" wrote in message
...
On Fri, 25 Aug 2017 15:06:21 +0100, "Brian Gaff"
wrote:

Lets hope, listening to today's news about testing driverless trucks
piloted by one driver that nobody hacks those.


According to today's 13:00 BBC One news, they will all have a driver but
the rear two just sit there. The lead truck generates a wifi hotspot
which allows the two rear trucks to drive very close to one another and
to respond faster than a human. Why not do away with the wifi control
link, do away with the two rear drivers, do away with the two rear cabs,
connect the rear two trailers to the driving truck with sturdy tow bars
and bingo!

We're moving into a new house next week with a central heating
controller which allows about a million combination of settings together
with an eBUS box which allows all the bits to communicate with one
another via a two-wire serial bus. For goodness sake, it's a kettle with
a pump!

I, not for the first time, despair.

--
Alan White
Mozilla Firefox and Forte Agent.
By Loch Long, twenty-eight miles NW of Glasgow, Scotland.
Webcam and weather:-
http://windycroft.co.uk/weather


  #24  
Old August 26th 17, 11:06 AM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
Brian Gaff
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Posts: 6,879
Default Samsung TV's "bricked"

There has to be a fail safe mode though as any electronics can be faulty at
any time regardless of any malicious intent.

I recall back in the 60s Thunderbirds had several radio controlled machines
for use on aircraft landing with dodgy landing gear. they say there is
nothing new.

its just the tech that enables it.
After all the Fire brigade now use drones.
Brian

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"Davey" wrote in message
news
On Fri, 25 Aug 2017 18:15:26 +0100
Andy Burns wrote:

Davey wrote:

I had thought that, the Australians have them and call them Road
Trains. Like you, I cannot see any advantage of the proposed system
over the one already tried and tested.


I wouldn't expect the fuel savings to be /that/ much for a convoy of
three.

The drivers will get used to just sitting there, doing nothing, and
have difficulty remaining alert enough to take over at a moment's
notice when a MegaBus overtakes and interferes with the convoy's WiFi
hotspot.




Just imagine the havoc that could be created if somebody hacked that
hotspot. Shudder.

--
Davey.



  #25  
Old August 26th 17, 11:07 AM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
Brian Gaff
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Posts: 6,879
Default Samsung TV's "bricked"

I was thinking of two of them near each other on the same road and the
system spotting a stronger signal and moving over to that one. I bet the
passwords will all be fred or 1234 anyway.
brian

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"Andy Burns" wrote in message
...
Davey wrote:

[lorry convoys]

Just imagine the havoc that could be created if somebody hacked that
hotspot. Shudder.


Look out for 'cantennas' over lane 1 on motorway bridges ...





  #26  
Old August 26th 17, 11:13 AM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
Brian Gaff
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Posts: 6,879
Default Samsung TV's "bricked"

That has been sorted out. the loading has to be done carefully and some
figures fed in before they start apparently, so the most difficult vehicle
is catered for. I'm more concerned with windage, shedding of loads and blow
outs myself.


Can you imagine the chaos if the front vehicle collided with something and
it disabled the link. all driving that close probably every other driver in
the other trucks would be killled outright before they have time to say
****.
Brian

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"Indy Jess John" wrote in message
...
On 25/08/2017 18:15, Andy Burns wrote:
Davey wrote:

I had thought that, the Australians have them and call them Road
Trains. Like you, I cannot see any advantage of the proposed system
over the one already tried and tested.


I wouldn't expect the fuel savings to be /that/ much for a convoy of
three.

The drivers will get used to just sitting there, doing nothing, and have
difficulty remaining alert enough to take over at a moment's notice when
a MegaBus overtakes and interferes with the convoy's WiFi hotspot.



The report on the TV tonight indicated that the wifi link was concerned
with controlling the speed and distance from the vehicle in front, and the
driver operated the steering wheel.

That suggests that the economies are all down to reduced wind resistance
due to the fast computer reaction time allowing the convoy to drive closer
than humans could. That concept would fall flat if the one at the back
was heavier than the one ahead and therefore could not match the braking
distance of the one in front in the event of an emergency stop.

Jim



  #27  
Old August 26th 17, 11:15 AM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
Brian Gaff
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Posts: 6,879
Default Samsung TV's "bricked"

That issue apparently is one of the problems with autonomous vehicles like
The google one. They have to talk to each other, but if you get a mixture of
people and machines controlling stuff it can get to be a bit dangerous.
Brian

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"Andy Burns" wrote in message
...
Indy Jess John wrote:

The report on the TV tonight indicated that the wifi link was concerned
with controlling the speed and distance from the vehicle in front, and
the driver operated the steering wheel.


When his windscreen is [even] tight[er] up the arse of the one in front?

I hope these things don't get let out of lane 1 (except to overtake
escorted loads etc) so we don't get convoys trying to overtake one
another.



  #28  
Old August 26th 17, 11:17 AM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
Brian Gaff
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Posts: 6,879
Default Samsung TV's "bricked"

Yup heard that as well. sounds like an ideal test Clarkson might test.

I suppose it would be too much to expect him to be in it at the time?
:-)
Brian

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"Jeff Layman" wrote in message
news
On 25/08/17 18:09, Davey wrote:
On Fri, 25 Aug 2017 17:46:31 +0100
Alan White wrote:

According to today's 13:00 BBC One news, they will all have a driver
but the rear two just sit there. The lead truck generates a wifi
hotspot which allows the two rear trucks to drive very close to one
another and to respond faster than a human. Why not do away with the
wifi control link, do away with the two rear drivers, do away with
the two rear cabs, connect the rear two trailers to the driving truck
with sturdy tow bars and bingo!



I had thought that, the Australians have them and call them Road
Trains. Like you, I cannot see any advantage of the proposed system
over the one already tried and tested.


Road trains in Australia are simply one tractor unit pulling two or three
trailers, not separate vehicles. As far as I remember, they are not
allowed inside cities or larger towns, and stop at areas outside, where
the trailers are split and additional tractor units connected to take them
into the urban areas.

I remember being parked at the side of the highway when one of these road
trains went past doing over 100kph. Even though I was in a big car (a 4.2
litre Holden), it was bounced around by the air being forced out of the
way. I don't know if it is apocryphal or not, but I heard that parked
caravans have been wrecked after being sucked into the slipstream.

--

Jeff



  #29  
Old August 26th 17, 11:18 AM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
Alan White[_3_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 76
Default Samsung TV's "bricked"

On Sat, 26 Aug 2017 08:12:29 GMT, Paul Ratcliffe
wrote:

On Fri, 25 Aug 2017 17:46:31 +0100, Alan White
wrote:

We're moving into a new house next week


You said that a few months ago...


A few months ago it was true. Don't ask.

--
Alan White
Mozilla Firefox and Forte Agent.
By Loch Long, twenty-eight miles NW of Glasgow, Scotland.
Webcam and weather:- http://windycroft.co.uk/weather
  #30  
Old August 26th 17, 11:23 AM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
Brian Gaff
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 6,879
Default Samsung TV's "bricked"

Yes but who actually tests stuff. It seems to me if Windows 10 is used as a
for instance, that they are using the general public as the testers, and so
by the time they had themselves done the testing, the hardware would be
obsolete.

I have a Humanware Daisy CD player here. it was unreliable for a long time
till I found a Canadian web site with updated firmware, which the British
distributors claimed did not exist on it. I downloaded it, burned it onto a
CD and followed the instructions and now its working better than it ever
did, albeit with a Canadian blokes voice and not a UK female who sounds like
some 1960s school teacher.
Brian

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"Wolfgang Schwanke" wrote in message
...
"Ian Field"
wrote in :

If it ain't broke, don't fix it - but sooner or later the encoding will
be changed and you'll have to risk a firmware update.


Given that nowadays televisions are connected to the net, security
updates are a good idea and the fact that they do them means they are
offering a good service.

It happened some years back with Setpal firmware Freeview boxes - dunno
about generally, but mine couldn't be flashed and was scrap.


If a device can brick itself, the logic of the update process is badly
designed. It should never be in a non-recoverable state even if things
go horribly wrong, and that can be avoided if the update process is
well thought out.

--
Klänge für Millionen überwinden die Distanzen

http://www.wschwanke.de/ http://www.fotos-aus-der-luft.de/
usenet_20031215 (AT) wschwanke (DOT) de



 




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