A Sky, cable and digital tv forum. Digital TV Banter

If this is your first visit, be sure to check out the FAQ by clicking the link above. You may have to register before you can post: click the register link above to proceed. To start viewing messages, select the forum that you want to visit from the selection below.

Go Back   Home » Digital TV Banter forum » Digital TV Newsgroups » uk.tech.digital-tv (Digital TV - General)
Site Map Home Register Authors List Search Today's Posts Mark Forums Read Web Partners

uk.tech.digital-tv (Digital TV - General) (uk.tech.digital-tv) Discussion of all matters technical in origin related to the reception of digital television transmissions, be they via satellite, terrestrial or cable. Advertising is forbidden, with no exceptions.

Samsung TV's "bricked"



 
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
  #11  
Old August 25th 17, 08:31 PM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
Max Demian
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 3,829
Default Samsung TV's "bricked"

On 25/08/2017 12:22, MR wrote:
https://www.engadget.com/2017/08/24/...icking-uk-tvs/

Oh well, they'd make a good fire guard or art installation.


"Slabbed" surely.

I was always nervous when my Sony TV used to update itself over the
Internet. It flashed different coloured lights for five minutes then
returned (with no discernable change to functionality). Especially
nervous when it was out of guarantee. Fortunately it's now the other
side of the room from the router and I don't have an Ethernet cable long
enough.

--
Max Demian
  #12  
Old August 25th 17, 09:07 PM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
Phi
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 276
Default Samsung TV's "bricked"


"Huge" wrote in message
...
On 2017-08-25, Alan White wrote:
On Fri, 25 Aug 2017 15:06:21 +0100, "Brian Gaff"
wrote:

Lets hope, listening to today's news about testing driverless trucks
piloted by one driver that nobody hacks those.


According to today's 13:00 BBC One news, they will all have a driver but
the rear two just sit there. The lead truck generates a wifi hotspot
which allows the two rear trucks to drive very close to one another and
to respond faster than a human. Why not do away with the wifi control
link, do away with the two rear drivers, do away with the two rear cabs,
connect the rear two trailers to the driving truck with sturdy tow bars
and bingo!


Why not use the "platoon" technology we've had for about 100 years where
one man controls dozens of wagons; a freight train.


De-Beechingise the railway.

  #13  
Old August 25th 17, 09:24 PM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
Ian Field
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 159
Default Samsung TV's "bricked"



"Davey" wrote in message
news
On Fri, 25 Aug 2017 17:46:31 +0100
Alan White wrote:

According to today's 13:00 BBC One news, they will all have a driver
but the rear two just sit there. The lead truck generates a wifi
hotspot which allows the two rear trucks to drive very close to one
another and to respond faster than a human. Why not do away with the
wifi control link, do away with the two rear drivers, do away with
the two rear cabs, connect the rear two trailers to the driving truck
with sturdy tow bars and bingo!



I had thought that, the Australians have them and call them Road
Trains. Like you, I cannot see any advantage of the proposed system
over the one already tried and tested.


Pretty sure Australian road trains have been around a lot longer than this
sort of technology.

AFAIK: they're just multiple trailers coupled up - on some Australian roads,
you can drive all day and not see another vehicle.

  #14  
Old August 25th 17, 09:30 PM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
Ian Field
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 159
Default Samsung TV's "bricked"



"Jeff Layman" wrote in message
news
On 25/08/17 18:09, Davey wrote:
On Fri, 25 Aug 2017 17:46:31 +0100
Alan White wrote:

According to today's 13:00 BBC One news, they will all have a driver
but the rear two just sit there. The lead truck generates a wifi
hotspot which allows the two rear trucks to drive very close to one
another and to respond faster than a human. Why not do away with the
wifi control link, do away with the two rear drivers, do away with
the two rear cabs, connect the rear two trailers to the driving truck
with sturdy tow bars and bingo!



I had thought that, the Australians have them and call them Road
Trains. Like you, I cannot see any advantage of the proposed system
over the one already tried and tested.


Road trains in Australia are simply one tractor unit pulling two or three
trailers, not separate vehicles. As far as I remember, they are not
allowed inside cities or larger towns, and stop at areas outside, where
the trailers are split and additional tractor units connected to take them
into the urban areas.


that's more or less how I understood it - probably no hi tech involved
whatsoever.

Just seriously big lorries pulling multiple trailers.

  #15  
Old August 25th 17, 09:32 PM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
Ian Field
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 159
Default Samsung TV's "bricked"



"Ian Jackson" wrote in message
...
In message , Davey
writes
On Fri, 25 Aug 2017 17:46:31 +0100
Alan White wrote:

According to today's 13:00 BBC One news, they will all have a driver
but the rear two just sit there. The lead truck generates a wifi
hotspot which allows the two rear trucks to drive very close to one
another and to respond faster than a human. Why not do away with the
wifi control link, do away with the two rear drivers, do away with
the two rear cabs, connect the rear two trailers to the driving truck
with sturdy tow bars and bingo!



I had thought that, the Australians have them and call them Road
Trains. Like you, I cannot see any advantage of the proposed system
over the one already tried and tested.


One problem could be how to deal with the trailers at the start end of the
journey. You would need special terminals (like railway stations) to
accommodate the length of the train. We don't have the wide open spaces of
Australia, so there might also be difficulties getting around the bends
and obstructions on our British roads.


My town had railway sidings behind all the factories - but no, we had to
shove all our freight onto the roads...................

  #16  
Old August 25th 17, 09:34 PM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
Ian Field
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 159
Default Samsung TV's "bricked"



"Phi" wrote in message
news

"Huge" wrote in message
...
On 2017-08-25, Alan White wrote:
On Fri, 25 Aug 2017 15:06:21 +0100, "Brian Gaff"
wrote:

Lets hope, listening to today's news about testing driverless trucks
piloted by one driver that nobody hacks those.

According to today's 13:00 BBC One news, they will all have a driver but
the rear two just sit there. The lead truck generates a wifi hotspot
which allows the two rear trucks to drive very close to one another and
to respond faster than a human. Why not do away with the wifi control
link, do away with the two rear drivers, do away with the two rear cabs,
connect the rear two trailers to the driving truck with sturdy tow bars
and bingo!


Why not use the "platoon" technology we've had for about 100 years where
one man controls dozens of wagons; a freight train.


De-Beechingise the railway.


That's the name I was trying to remember - my town used to have sidings
behind all the factories.

  #17  
Old August 25th 17, 09:40 PM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
Ian Field
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 159
Default Samsung TV's "bricked"



"Max Demian" wrote in message
o.uk...
On 25/08/2017 12:22, MR wrote:
https://www.engadget.com/2017/08/24/...icking-uk-tvs/

Oh well, they'd make a good fire guard or art installation.


"Slabbed" surely.

I was always nervous when my Sony TV used to update itself over the
Internet. It flashed different coloured lights for five minutes then
returned (with no discernable change to functionality). Especially nervous
when it was out of guarantee. Fortunately it's now the other side of the
room from the router and I don't have an Ethernet cable long enough.


If it ain't broke, don't fix it - but sooner or later the encoding will be
changed and you'll have to risk a firmware update.

It happened some years back with Setpal firmware Freeview boxes - dunno
about generally, but mine couldn't be flashed and was scrap.

  #18  
Old August 25th 17, 10:23 PM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
Max Demian
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 3,829
Default Samsung TV's "bricked"

On 25/08/2017 21:40, Ian Field wrote:
"Max Demian" wrote in message
o.uk...
On 25/08/2017 12:22, MR wrote:
https://www.engadget.com/2017/08/24/...icking-uk-tvs/

Oh well, they'd make a good fire guard or art installation.


"Slabbed" surely.

I was always nervous when my Sony TV used to update itself over the
Internet. It flashed different coloured lights for five minutes then
returned (with no discernable change to functionality). Especially
nervous when it was out of guarantee. Fortunately it's now the other
side of the room from the router and I don't have an Ethernet cable
long enough.


If it ain't broke, don't fix it - but sooner or later the encoding will
be changed and you'll have to risk a firmware update.


I think DVB-T2 will be around for a bit. And I don't use the tuner
anyway - just HDMI and SCART, and possibly USB.

--
Max Demian
  #19  
Old August 25th 17, 10:32 PM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
Indy Jess John
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 1,218
Default Samsung TV's "bricked"

On 25/08/2017 18:15, Andy Burns wrote:
Davey wrote:

I had thought that, the Australians have them and call them Road
Trains. Like you, I cannot see any advantage of the proposed system
over the one already tried and tested.


I wouldn't expect the fuel savings to be /that/ much for a convoy of three.

The drivers will get used to just sitting there, doing nothing, and have
difficulty remaining alert enough to take over at a moment's notice when
a MegaBus overtakes and interferes with the convoy's WiFi hotspot.



The report on the TV tonight indicated that the wifi link was concerned
with controlling the speed and distance from the vehicle in front, and
the driver operated the steering wheel.

That suggests that the economies are all down to reduced wind resistance
due to the fast computer reaction time allowing the convoy to drive
closer than humans could. That concept would fall flat if the one at
the back was heavier than the one ahead and therefore could not match
the braking distance of the one in front in the event of an emergency stop.

Jim

  #20  
Old August 25th 17, 10:39 PM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
Andy Burns[_12_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 409
Default Samsung TV's "bricked"

Indy Jess John wrote:

The report on the TV tonight indicated that the wifi link was concerned
with controlling the speed and distance from the vehicle in front, and
the driver operated the steering wheel.


When his windscreen is [even] tight[er] up the arse of the one in front?

I hope these things don't get let out of lane 1 (except to overtake
escorted loads etc) so we don't get convoys trying to overtake one another.

 




Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

vB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Forum Jump


All times are GMT. The time now is 04:46 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.6.4
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.SEO by vBSEO 2.4.0
Copyright 2004-2017 Digital TV Banter.
The comments are property of their posters.