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uk.tech.digital-tv (Digital TV - General) (uk.tech.digital-tv) Discussion of all matters technical in origin related to the reception of digital television transmissions, be they via satellite, terrestrial or cable. Advertising is forbidden, with no exceptions.

Watching an eclipse



 
 
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  #21  
Old August 22nd 17, 02:48 PM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
Bill Wright[_3_]
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Posts: 1,972
Default Watching an eclipse

On 22/08/2017 13:32, Max Demian wrote:
On 22/08/2017 08:32, Brian Gaff wrote:
No that is wrong. I think the point is, unless the material is
certified for
theĀ* direct viewing of the sun, its probably no good and should be
avoided.


What does 'certified' mean? Mine (useless for yesterday evening's cloudy
aspect needless to say) say "Safe Solar Viewers" and have a CE symbol in
the middle. But anyone can print that. In the end (as with most things)
you have no option but to rely on your own experience and common sense.


If you watch an eclipse on the telly you can turn the brightness right down.

Bill
  #22  
Old August 22nd 17, 08:09 PM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
Paul Ratcliffe
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Posts: 2,465
Default Watching an eclipse

On Tue, 22 Aug 2017 14:48:45 +0100, Bill Wright wrote:

If you watch an eclipse on the telly you can turn the brightness right down.


Didn't they already do that on the camera?
We do these things so you don't have to, as somebody once said.
  #23  
Old August 22nd 17, 10:11 PM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
Ian Field
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Posts: 159
Default Watching an eclipse



"Scott" wrote in message
...
I have just seen coverage on Channel 4 News of the eclipse, where
people were watching using special sunglasses. I though no sunglasses
were safe for looking directly at the sun?


Standard arc welding mask filter glass is too dark - gas goggles not dark
enough. MIG welder glass is nearer the mark.

The safe way is pinhole projection - pretty much what it says, the aperture
is literally a pinhole and the image is projected on a sheet of paper at the
back of the cardboard box.

  #24  
Old August 22nd 17, 10:17 PM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
Ian Field
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Posts: 159
Default Watching an eclipse



"Scott" wrote in message
...
On Mon, 21 Aug 2017 20:16:09 +0100, Andy Burns
wrote:

Scott wrote:

people were watching using special sunglasses. I though no sunglasses
were safe for looking directly at the sun?


special eclipse viewing filters aren't sunglasses.

Okay, but are they safe? I was taught as a child that NO device was
safe to look directly at the sun and the ONLY way to watch an eclipse
safely was via a pinhole projecting on to a sheet of paper.


You'd have to be a serious Darwin candidate to hurt yourself with pinhole
projection, but some welding mask filter glass is too dark - safe, but you
don't see much either.

gas goggles are no better than some stronger sun glasses.

  #25  
Old August 22nd 17, 10:22 PM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
Ian Field
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Posts: 159
Default Watching an eclipse



"Brian Gaff" wrote in message
news
You should not have done that.
Brian


Indeed - too dark to see anything, I had to go back in the shed and get the
MIG mask.

  #26  
Old August 22nd 17, 10:24 PM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
Ian Field
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Posts: 159
Default Watching an eclipse



"Max Demian" wrote in message
o.uk...
On 22/08/2017 08:32, Brian Gaff wrote:
No that is wrong. I think the point is, unless the material is certified
for
the direct viewing of the sun, its probably no good and should be
avoided.


What does 'certified' mean? Mine (useless for yesterday evening's cloudy
aspect needless to say) say "Safe Solar Viewers" and have a CE symbol in
the middle. But anyone can print that.


When I serviced PC monitors for a living - the chances of it bursting into
flames was directly proportional to the number of certification stickers on
the back.................

  #27  
Old August 22nd 17, 10:26 PM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
Ian Field
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Posts: 159
Default Watching an eclipse



"Paul Ratcliffe" wrote in message
...
On Tue, 22 Aug 2017 14:48:45 +0100, Bill Wright
wrote:

If you watch an eclipse on the telly you can turn the brightness right
down.


Didn't they already do that on the camera?
We do these things so you don't have to, as somebody once said.


Direct sunlight would certainly damage a pre solid state camera. Solid state
ones probably need some protection too.

  #28  
Old August 22nd 17, 11:52 PM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
Peter Duncanson
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Posts: 4,226
Default Watching an eclipse

On Tue, 22 Aug 2017 22:11:58 +0100, "Ian Field"
wrote:



"Scott" wrote in message
.. .
I have just seen coverage on Channel 4 News of the eclipse, where
people were watching using special sunglasses. I though no sunglasses
were safe for looking directly at the sun?


Standard arc welding mask filter glass is too dark - gas goggles not dark
enough. MIG welder glass is nearer the mark.

The safe way is pinhole projection - pretty much what it says, the aperture
is literally a pinhole and the image is projected on a sheet of paper at the
back of the cardboard box.


That is the origin of the word "camera" for those things we take
pictures with.
It started as "camera obscura" (dark chamber).
Oxford English Dictionary:

camera obscura, n.

An instrument comprising a darkened room or box with a convex lens
or a pinhole in one side, used for projecting an image of an
external object on to a surface inside the instrument so that it can
be viewed, drawn, or (in later use) reproduced on a light-sensitive
surface.


--
Peter Duncanson
(in uk.tech.digital-tv)
  #29  
Old August 23rd 17, 03:53 AM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
Bill Wright[_3_]
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Posts: 1,972
Default Watching an eclipse

On 22/08/2017 20:09, Paul Ratcliffe wrote:
On Tue, 22 Aug 2017 14:48:45 +0100, Bill Wright wrote:

If you watch an eclipse on the telly you can turn the brightness right down.


Didn't they already do that on the camera?
We do these things so you don't have to, as somebody once said.

Better safe than sorry. Belt and braces I always say. Best thing is to
project the image from the TV screen through a pinhole onto the opposite
wall and look at that.
Thing is, if you are blinded by an eclipse everyone will assume you've
lost your sight because of excessive masturbation. When I have to stop
at a pedestrian crossing for a bloke with a white stick I always wind
the window down and shout "You're a dirty ******!" Then I shout at the
dog, "And you suck yourself off!" That teaches them. They always scuttle
off.

Bill
  #30  
Old August 23rd 17, 03:55 AM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
Bill Wright[_3_]
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Posts: 1,972
Default Watching an eclipse

On 22/08/2017 22:17, Huge wrote:
On 2017-08-22, Ian Field wrote:


"Scott" wrote in message
...
I have just seen coverage on Channel 4 News of the eclipse, where
people were watching using special sunglasses. I though no sunglasses
were safe for looking directly at the sun?


Standard arc welding mask filter glass is too dark


Damn, I must have imagined those two eclipses, then.

You are aware it comes in different densities? Well, no, apparently not.


I don't know what density my welding glasses are but I can look through
them at the sun without blinding myself.

Bill
 




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