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BBC News Blunder



 
 
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  #71  
Old August 2nd 17, 11:23 AM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
Indy Jess John
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Posts: 1,180
Default BBC News Blunder

On 02/08/2017 08:11, Martin wrote:
On Tue, 1 Aug 2017 22:59:39 +0100, wrote:

On 01/08/2017 22:32, Indy Jess John wrote:
On 01/08/2017 11:17, Robin wrote:

Now if octet[1] had prevailed ...

[1] https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Octet_(computing)

It would have caused considerable confusion for users of the ICL 1900
range. It had a 24-bit word which divided into 4x6-bit bytes but would
have looked like 3 octets.


Sorry, you've lost me there since IIRC an octet meant 8 sequential bits,
nothing more and nothing less. I thought it was defined that way to
avoid the ambiguity of "byte" meaning anything from 1 to 48 (or more?)
bits.


Wiki defines it that way. It seems to be historical relating to pre-1960s
computer usage.
I started using/programming computers in 1962. I've never seen a byte used to
mean anything other than 8 bits.


If my memory serves me correctly, apart from the ICL 1900 series with
6-bit bytes (and escape sequences for the less likely to be used range),
the DEC10 had 7-bit bytes, five to a 36-bit word (the other one was
either a sign bit or parity, I can't remember which).

Jim

  #72  
Old August 2nd 17, 11:28 AM posted to uk.telecom.broadband,uk.tech.digital-tv
AnthonyL
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Posts: 183
Default BBC News Blunder

On Tue, 01 Aug 2017 18:49:18 GMT, Paul Ratcliffe
wrote:

On Tue, 01 Aug 2017 11:45:44 GMT, AnthonyL wrote:

To paraphrase a well known saying, there are 10 type of people, those
who understand bits and those that don't.


"...those who understand binary and those who don't".


That's why I qualified my statement with "paraphrase".

--
AnthonyL
  #73  
Old August 2nd 17, 11:28 AM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
AnthonyL
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Posts: 183
Default BBC News Blunder

On Wed, 2 Aug 2017 09:48:39 +0100, "NY" wrote:

"Andy Burns" wrote in message
...
Robin wrote:

"NY" wrote:

I can understand why non-computer people refer to megabytes when they
mean
megabits, because most other measures in computing are multiples of a
byte

Now if octet had prevailed ...


Outside of France ...


"Byte" has two big advantages over "octet", as a word:

1. It is a single syllable

2. It starts with a consonant, so you don't get the problem of having to
elide the vowel at the end of SI prefix (kilo, mega, giga, tera) with the
vowel at the beginning of octet - or have the intrusive R, as in "laura
norder" :-)

But apart from that, yes, it would have been better if we had used a word
that was not so similar to "bit".


I thought, and it may have been folklore, that the term "byte" is a
contraction of "by eight" when in earlier days the number of bits used
in computing varied significantly from system to system.


--
AnthonyL
  #74  
Old August 2nd 17, 11:34 AM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
NY
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Posts: 1,135
Default BBC News Blunder

"AnthonyL" wrote in message
...
I thought, and it may have been folklore, that the term "byte" is a
contraction of "by eight" when in earlier days the number of bits used
in computing varied significantly from system to system.


It's the derivation that I've heard, though I don't know whether there's any
truth in it, or whether they simply lengthened the vowel of bit to make
bite/byte.

  #75  
Old August 2nd 17, 02:53 PM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
tim...[_2_]
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Posts: 513
Default BBC News Blunder



"Robin" wrote in message
...
On 02/08/2017 09:48, NY wrote:
"Andy Burns" wrote in message
...
Robin wrote:

"NY" wrote:

I can understand why non-computer people refer to megabytes when they
mean
megabits, because most other measures in computing are multiples of a
byte

Now if octet had prevailed ...

Outside of France ...


"Byte" has two big advantages over "octet", as a word:

1. It is a single syllable


I'll second that

2. It starts with a consonant, so you don't get the problem of having to
elide the vowel at the end of SI prefix (kilo, mega, giga, tera) with the
vowel at the beginning of octet - or have the intrusive R, as in "laura
norder" :-)


though kiloctet and megoctet might have become common usage (much as with
ohms)


I don't recognise that usage for Ohms



  #76  
Old August 2nd 17, 02:54 PM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
tim...[_2_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 513
Default BBC News Blunder



"AnthonyL" wrote in message
...
On Wed, 2 Aug 2017 09:48:39 +0100, "NY" wrote:

"Andy Burns" wrote in message
...
Robin wrote:

"NY" wrote:

I can understand why non-computer people refer to megabytes when they
mean
megabits, because most other measures in computing are multiples of a
byte

Now if octet had prevailed ...

Outside of France ...


"Byte" has two big advantages over "octet", as a word:

1. It is a single syllable

2. It starts with a consonant, so you don't get the problem of having to
elide the vowel at the end of SI prefix (kilo, mega, giga, tera) with the
vowel at the beginning of octet - or have the intrusive R, as in "laura
norder" :-)

But apart from that, yes, it would have been better if we had used a word
that was not so similar to "bit".


I thought, and it may have been folklore, that the term "byte" is a
contraction of "by eight" when in earlier days the number of bits used
in computing varied significantly from system to system.


It's a long time ago, so I might have misremembered

but I once worked with 6 bit machine that called them bytes

tim




--
AnthonyL


  #77  
Old August 2nd 17, 03:33 PM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
Max Demian
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Posts: 3,782
Default BBC News Blunder

On 02/08/2017 15:53, tim... wrote:
"Robin" wrote in message
...
On 02/08/2017 09:48, NY wrote:


"Byte" has two big advantages over "octet", as a word:

1. It is a single syllable


I'll second that

2. It starts with a consonant, so you don't get the problem of having
to elide the vowel at the end of SI prefix (kilo, mega, giga, tera)
with the vowel at the beginning of octet - or have the intrusive R,
as in "laura norder" :-)


though kiloctet and megoctet might have become common usage (much as
with ohms)


I don't recognise that usage for Ohms


It's kilohm, not kiloohm.

--
Max Demian
  #78  
Old August 2nd 17, 03:38 PM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
Max Demian
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Posts: 3,782
Default BBC News Blunder

On 02/08/2017 12:34, NY wrote:
"AnthonyL" wrote in message
...
I thought, and it may have been folklore, that the term "byte" is a
contraction of "by eight" when in earlier days the number of bits used
in computing varied significantly from system to system.


It's the derivation that I've heard, though I don't know whether there's
any truth in it, or whether they simply lengthened the vowel of bit to
make bite/byte.


https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Byte#History
"It is a deliberate respelling of bite to avoid accidental mutation to
bit." (FWIW)

--
Max Demian
  #79  
Old August 2nd 17, 03:43 PM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
tim...[_2_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 513
Default BBC News Blunder



"Max Demian" wrote in message
o.uk...
On 02/08/2017 15:53, tim... wrote:
"Robin" wrote in message
...
On 02/08/2017 09:48, NY wrote:


"Byte" has two big advantages over "octet", as a word:

1. It is a single syllable

I'll second that

2. It starts with a consonant, so you don't get the problem of having
to elide the vowel at the end of SI prefix (kilo, mega, giga, tera)
with the vowel at the beginning of octet - or have the intrusive R, as
in "laura norder" :-)

though kiloctet and megoctet might have become common usage (much as
with ohms)


I don't recognise that usage for Ohms


It's kilohm, not kiloohm.


yeah

but it's mega-ohm

tim



--
Max Demian


  #80  
Old August 2nd 17, 03:43 PM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
Max Demian
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 3,782
Default BBC News Blunder

On 02/08/2017 12:23, Indy Jess John wrote:
On 02/08/2017 08:11, Martin wrote:
On Tue, 1 Aug 2017 22:59:39 +0100, wrote:

On 01/08/2017 22:32, Indy Jess John wrote:
On 01/08/2017 11:17, Robin wrote:

Now if octet[1] had prevailed ...

[1] https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Octet_(computing)

It would have caused considerable confusion for users of the ICL 1900
range. It had a 24-bit word which divided into 4x6-bit bytes but would
have looked like 3 octets.


Sorry, you've lost me there since IIRC an octet meant 8 sequential bits,
nothing more and nothing less. I thought it was defined that way to
avoid the ambiguity of "byte" meaning anything from 1 to 48 (or more?)
bits.


Wiki defines it that way. It seems to be historical relating to pre-1960s
computer usage.
I started using/programming computers in 1962. I've never seen a byte
used to
mean anything other than 8 bits.


If my memory serves me correctly, apart from the ICL 1900 series with
6-bit bytes (and escape sequences for the less likely to be used range),
the DEC10 had 7-bit bytes, five to a 36-bit word (the other one was
either a sign bit or parity, I can't remember which).


As I remember, the DEC-10 represented characters (with capital letters
only) in six bits, six to a word. Hence the packed and unpacked arrays
of char found in Pascal. I don't know whether the term 'byte' was used
in this context.

--
Max Demian
 




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