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BBC News Blunder



 
 
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  #101  
Old August 3rd 17, 05:42 PM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
R. Mark Clayton[_2_]
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Posts: 534
Default BBC News Blunder

On Thursday, 3 August 2017 16:20:01 UTC+1, Graham J wrote:
bert wrote:

[snip]


Or What's a parity error?




Pieces of 7, pieces of 7.


No, that's a parroty error ...


That was in the ICL staff Xmas panto in 1976 - Snow White (system designer) and the Seven Bits IIRC


--
Graham J


  #102  
Old August 3rd 17, 07:04 PM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
NY
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Posts: 1,214
Default BBC News Blunder

"R. Mark Clayton" wrote in message
...
On Thursday, 3 August 2017 16:20:01 UTC+1, Graham J wrote:
bert wrote:

[snip]


Or What's a parity error?




Pieces of 7, pieces of 7.


No, that's a parroty error ...


That was in the ICL staff Xmas panto in 1976 - Snow White (system
designer) and the Seven Bits IIRC


That was in the days when ICL still had a sense of humour before the
bean-counters took over.

The entries in the phone book were in a standard format:

Name (as iniitials and surname), Job title (usually an incomprehensible set
of initials), Site code (three letters followed by two digits)

Someone managed to submit the following which lasted for several years, into
the time where I worked at BRA01 (first site in BRAcknell):

O. MacDonald, ADA FM, EIE10

  #103  
Old August 3rd 17, 08:56 PM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
Vir Campestris
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Posts: 404
Default BBC News Blunder

On 02/08/2017 08:11, Martin wrote:
On Tue, 1 Aug 2017 22:59:39 +0100, Robin wrote:

On 01/08/2017 22:32, Indy Jess John wrote:
On 01/08/2017 11:17, Robin wrote:

Now if octet[1] had prevailed ...

[1] https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Octet_(computing)

It would have caused considerable confusion for users of the ICL 1900
range. It had a 24-bit word which divided into 4x6-bit bytes but would
have looked like 3 octets.


Sorry, you've lost me there since IIRC an octet meant 8 sequential bits,
nothing more and nothing less. I thought it was defined that way to
avoid the ambiguity of "byte" meaning anything from 1 to 48 (or more?)
bits.


Wiki defines it that way. It seems to be historical relating to pre-1960s
computer usage.
I started using/programming computers in 1962. I've never seen a byte used to
mean anything other than 8 bits.

me too

1900s had chars, from what I remember. But I didn't use them much, and
it was a long time ago.

Andy
  #104  
Old August 3rd 17, 08:58 PM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
Vir Campestris
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Posts: 404
Default BBC News Blunder

On 02/08/2017 12:23, Indy Jess John wrote:
If my memory serves me correctly, apart from the ICL 1900 series with
6-bit bytes (and escape sequences for the less likely to be used range),
the DEC10 had 7-bit bytes, five to a 36-bit word (the other one was
either a sign bit or parity, I can't remember which).


.... another DECSystem10 user here. I don't remember the term 'byte'
being used for the ascii strings, not anywhere else.

Apart from the strings ISTR everything was 36 bits, except addresses
which only occupied the bottom half. The addressing was word oriented,
so 36 bits separated address 0 and address 1. (which were registers)

Andy
  #105  
Old August 3rd 17, 08:59 PM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
Vir Campestris
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Posts: 404
Default BBC News Blunder

On 02/08/2017 16:43, Max Demian wrote:
As I remember, the DEC-10 represented characters (with capital letters
only) in six bits, six to a word. Hence the packed and unpacked arrays
of char found in Pascal. I don't know whether the term 'byte' was used
in this context.


5 7-bit ascii characters for text, 6 6-bit characters for filenames.

Andy
  #106  
Old August 3rd 17, 09:03 PM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
Vir Campestris
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Posts: 404
Default BBC News Blunder

On 03/08/2017 19:04, NY wrote:
Someone managed to submit the following which lasted for several years,
into the time where I worked at BRA01 (first site in BRAcknell):


We may have met. I was there or BRA03/04 '79 onwards for the best part
of 20 years.

Andy
  #107  
Old August 4th 17, 10:10 AM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
NY
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Posts: 1,214
Default BBC News Blunder

"Vir Campestris" wrote in message
news
On 03/08/2017 19:04, NY wrote:
Someone managed to submit the following which lasted for several years,
into the time where I worked at BRA01 (first site in BRAcknell):


We may have met. I was there or BRA03/04 '79 onwards for the best part of
20 years.


I'm trying to remember which 03 and 04 were. I know the Retail building
between Doncastle Road and the junction of Ellesfield Avenue and the
Crowthorne Road, and the building at the cul-de-sac end of Lovelace Road,
but I can't think where the other buildings were. Was there another in
Doncastle Road?

I was on the Fifth Floor (Networking) in BRA01 most of the time, apart from
the last couple of years in the gallery around the edge of the Goldfish Bowl
computer hall when I was moved to Marketing (as an alternative to being made
redundant).

  #108  
Old August 4th 17, 10:52 AM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
NY
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Posts: 1,214
Default BBC News Blunder

"Martin" wrote in message
...
The entries in the phone book were in a standard format:

Name (as iniitials and surname), Job title (usually an incomprehensible
set
of initials), Site code (three letters followed by two digits)

Someone managed to submit the following which lasted for several years,
into
the time where I worked at BRA01 (first site in BRAcknell):

O. MacDonald, ADA FM, EIE10


LOL


Those were the days. There used to be a tannoy that the switchboard used if
they had a call for someone who was not at his desk (in the days before
mobile phones). I remember some of the names:

- A blunt no-nonsense northern guy called Herrick Thwaite
("Herrick-with-an-aitch, mind, not Eric") and the switchboard took great
delight in pronouncing his name in a very exaggerated manner, with a wheezy,
asthmatic H and an explosion on the final T.

- A guy who was visiting from (I think) Sweden whose name was Hans Goran
Puke. "Puke" was pronounced "Pookah" but some new lass on the tannoy took
one look at the name that had been given to her and said "Will Hans Goran...
er, Pyook? [giggle] (Is that really his name?) Will Hans Goran Pyook please
contact the switchboard. [chortling] (Oh, the poor man!) [lots of belly
laughter]", followed by a distant shriek of "Mary, turn it off - you're
still live".

I missed the tannoy when they stopped using it.

  #109  
Old August 4th 17, 12:22 PM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
AnthonyL
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Posts: 183
Default BBC News Blunder

On Fri, 4 Aug 2017 10:52:31 +0100, "NY" wrote:

"Martin" wrote in message
.. .
The entries in the phone book were in a standard format:

Name (as iniitials and surname), Job title (usually an incomprehensible
set
of initials), Site code (three letters followed by two digits)

Someone managed to submit the following which lasted for several years,
into
the time where I worked at BRA01 (first site in BRAcknell):

O. MacDonald, ADA FM, EIE10


LOL


Those were the days. There used to be a tannoy that the switchboard used if
they had a call for someone who was not at his desk (in the days before
mobile phones). I remember some of the names:

- A blunt no-nonsense northern guy called Herrick Thwaite
("Herrick-with-an-aitch, mind, not Eric") and the switchboard took great
delight in pronouncing his name in a very exaggerated manner, with a wheezy,
asthmatic H and an explosion on the final T.

- A guy who was visiting from (I think) Sweden whose name was Hans Goran
Puke. "Puke" was pronounced "Pookah" but some new lass on the tannoy took
one look at the name that had been given to her and said "Will Hans Goran...
er, Pyook? [giggle] (Is that really his name?) Will Hans Goran Pyook please
contact the switchboard. [chortling] (Oh, the poor man!) [lots of belly
laughter]", followed by a distant shriek of "Mary, turn it off - you're
still live".

I missed the tannoy when they stopped using it.


Cue the calls for Mike Hunt jokes!


--
AnthonyL
  #110  
Old August 4th 17, 01:02 PM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
NY
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Posts: 1,214
Default BBC News Blunder

"AnthonyL" wrote in message
...
On Fri, 4 Aug 2017 10:52:31 +0100, "NY" wrote:

There used to be a tannoy that the switchboard used if
they had a call for someone who was not at his desk (in the days before
mobile phones). I remember some of the names:

- A blunt no-nonsense northern guy called Herrick Thwaite
("Herrick-with-an-aitch, mind, not Eric") and the switchboard took great
delight in pronouncing his name in a very exaggerated manner, with a
wheezy,
asthmatic H and an explosion on the final T.

- A guy who was visiting from (I think) Sweden whose name was Hans Goran
Puke. "Puke" was pronounced "Pookah" but some new lass on the tannoy took
one look at the name that had been given to her and said "Will Hans
Goran...
er, Pyook? [giggle] (Is that really his name?) Will Hans Goran Pyook
please
contact the switchboard. [chortling] (Oh, the poor man!) [lots of belly
laughter]", followed by a distant shriek of "Mary, turn it off - you're
still live".

I missed the tannoy when they stopped using it.


Cue the calls for Mike Hunt jokes!


If only! "Porky's" has got a lot to answer for :-)

 




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