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uk.tech.digital-tv (Digital TV - General) (uk.tech.digital-tv) Discussion of all matters technical in origin related to the reception of digital television transmissions, be they via satellite, terrestrial or cable. Advertising is forbidden, with no exceptions.

I can't get rid of the smell



 
 
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  #31  
Old July 24th 17, 06:24 PM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
Ian Field
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Posts: 139
Default I can't get rid of the smell



"Brian Gaff" wrote in message
news
Oh I remember those.
I had one in a so quaintly named battery eliminator of the 1960s going
down.
I think it would make a good crowd control weapon.

Mind you exploding capacitors can make one heck of a mess if they occur on
an uncased piece of electronics.


Once I built a strobe for a local band - a real heavy duty job with a
motorcycle headlamp unit mounted on an ancient sun ray lamp base.

So heavy duty that only an electrolytic would do - eventually it went bang
with clouds of caustic steam.

When the band told me about it, they said the audience thought it was all
part of the act.

  #32  
Old July 24th 17, 07:03 PM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
Peter Duncanson
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Posts: 4,219
Default I can't get rid of the smell

On Mon, 24 Jul 2017 19:17:15 +0100, "Ian Field"
wrote:



"Brian Gaff" wrote in message
news
Yes it does but its not instant, that is the problem.
Mind you if you want painful RF burns are not nice.
I got one across my palm when I was a young un. Nobody told me that
sleeved wire when used as a transmitting aerial was dangerous if the
transmitter is quite powerful and the wire is in the way...


The cooking potential of microwaves was discovered by someone walking past
an aircraft radar antenna with a chocolate bar in their shirt pocket.


And folks, that is not a joke:
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Percy_Spencer#Career

By 1939 (Percy) Spencer became one of the world’s leading experts in
radar tube design. Spencer worked at Raytheon, a contractor for the
U.S. Department of Defense, as the chief of the power tube division.
....
[1945]
One day while building magnetrons, Spencer was standing in front of
an active radar set when he noticed the candy bar he had in his
pocket had melted. Spencer was not the first to notice this
phenomenon, but he was the first to investigate it. He decided to
experiment using food, including popcorn kernels, which became the
world’s first microwaved popcorn. In another experiment, an egg was
placed in a tea kettle, and the magnetron was placed directly above
it. The result was the egg exploding in the face of one of his
co-workers, who was looking in the kettle to observe. Spencer then
created the first true microwave oven by attaching a high density
electromagnetic field generator to an enclosed metal box. The
magnetron emitted microwaves into the metal box blocking any escape,
allowing for controlled and safe experimentation. He then placed
various food items in the box, while observing effects and
monitoring temperatures.

Raytheon filed a patent on October 8, 1945 for a microwave cooking
oven, eventually named the Radarange.

--
Peter Duncanson
(in uk.tech.digital-tv)
  #33  
Old July 28th 17, 10:51 AM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
Davey
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Posts: 2,239
Default I can't get rid of the smell

On Sat, 22 Jul 2017 19:26:40 +0100
"Ian Field" wrote:

"Indy Jess John" wrote in message
...
On 21/07/2017 17:29, Brian Gaff wrote:

Has anyone heard of this before? I know sometimes when you are
ill you get
spurious smells but I don't think that is the case here, unless
some bugs living in my TV have taken up residency in my nose.


The most likely explanation is that the smell has got into your
clothing and you are carrying it around with you.

I had a doctor's appointment last year, with a doctor I was seeing
for the first time. She asked me how many I smoked, and I told her
I hadn't smoked for over 40 years. She thought that unusual because
she could smell the smoke. It seems that earlier in the day I had
been in the company of a friend who smoked, and the smell had got
into my clothes, and that is why she assumed I smoked.

Something similar may have happened to you with the smell from the
TV.


At long last! - Smellyvision.


As impoverished students in about 1970, we bought a TV set from an
Indian family. For a couple of weeks, we had the smell of curry
whenever the tubes got hot, until the smell eventually went away.
The set finally let all its smoke out in a spectacular display, and
other sets in the street all lost their signal for a few seconds. I
think we re-invented the Spark-Gap Transmitter.

--
Davey.
  #36  
Old July 30th 17, 09:46 PM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
Adrian Caspersz
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Posts: 265
Default I can't get rid of the smell

On 24/07/17 20:03, Peter Duncanson wrote:

The result was the egg exploding in the face of one of his
co-workers, who was looking in the kettle to observe.


They sound committed to the cause of science as these two ...

http://www.jrcharney.com/gallery/missile.jpg

--
Adrian C
  #37  
Old July 31st 17, 08:02 AM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
tony sayer
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Posts: 4,978
Default I can't get rid of the smell

In article , Ian Field gangprobing.al
scribeth thus


"tony sayer" wrote in message
...
In article , Ian Field gangprobing.ali
scribeth thus


"Brian Gaff" wrote in message
news Yes you don't need the selenium in a high voltage device.

Actually - Trr came as a nasty surprise when they switched from selenium
to
silicon in TV EHT rectifiers.


Never seen it used in EHT applications mains input yes and yes they
stunk


Plenty selenium sticks in early monochrome portables and practically
mandatory on scope EHT systems.


Well scopes were built that bit better than cut to the bone TV's;!


Never saw any portables apart from the Sinclair one!, and like all
produced under that brand I think it lasted a very short time but no
Selenium EHT stacks in the mains driven 14 inch and upward sets unless
anyone knows different?.

Earliest i know of was an EY51 a wired in EHT diode!.


A scope I rescued from the tip underwent many repairs only to find low
emission - I replaced all the selenium sticks with series pairs of silicon
efficiency diodes for the lower volt drop.

They were phased out fairly quickly on CTV triplers.

What Selenium used in Colour TV's never saw that!

Was bad enough with Silicon triplers!

But then again never saw all makes if TV which ones used them?
--
Tony Sayer



  #38  
Old July 31st 17, 05:51 PM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
Ian Field
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 139
Default I can't get rid of the smell



"tony sayer" wrote in message
news
In article , Ian Field gangprobing.al
scribeth thus


"tony sayer" wrote in message
...
In article , Ian Field gangprobing.ali
scribeth thus


"Brian Gaff" wrote in message
news Yes you don't need the selenium in a high voltage device.

Actually - Trr came as a nasty surprise when they switched from selenium
to
silicon in TV EHT rectifiers.


Never seen it used in EHT applications mains input yes and yes they
stunk


Plenty selenium sticks in early monochrome portables and practically
mandatory on scope EHT systems.


Well scopes were built that bit better than cut to the bone TV's;!


Never saw any portables apart from the Sinclair one!, and like all
produced under that brand I think it lasted a very short time but no
Selenium EHT stacks in the mains driven 14 inch and upward sets unless
anyone knows different?.


Selenium sticks persisted in monochrome portables almost until the
introduction of silicon EHT rectifiers potted in the same assembly as the
windings - there was a short period of wire ended silicon EHT rectifiers
that were pretty much designed to fit in the space provided for a selenium
stick. They were certainly sold as service replacements, and were probably
also used in new production.

 




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