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an easy way to share files and a strange thing in a BBC programme



 
 
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  #11  
Old July 11th 17, 09:59 AM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
Paul Ratcliffe
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Posts: 2,430
Default an easy way to share files and a strange thing in a BBC programme

On Tue, 11 Jul 2017 05:00:06 +0100, Bill Wright
wrote:

How do they achieve a shallow depth of field in bright sunshine? Neutral
density filters stacked in front of the lens?


Yes. Exactly that.
Some cameras have them in a filter wheel between the lens and the
image sensor, but they can be augmented by extra filters in front.

Rod.

Such ingenuity just to **** up the picture.


So you like everything in focus from the end of your nose to
infinity do you, and the flat pictures that result?

Control of excess light does not f* up the picture.
  #12  
Old July 11th 17, 11:47 AM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
Bill Wright[_3_]
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Posts: 1,719
Default an easy way to share files and a strange thing in a BBC programme

On 11/07/2017 10:59, Paul Ratcliffe wrote:

Such ingenuity just to **** up the picture.


So you like everything in focus from the end of your nose to
infinity do you, and the flat pictures that result?


No, I like the subject of the shot to be in sharp focus, with the
background possibly slightly out of focus. This simulates human vision.
Since the cameraman's job is provide images that don't force the viewer
to be unduly aware of the medium, this is how it should be done. The
medium should be transparent.

If for instance the reader is constantly aware of the font, then the
book has been produced using the wrong font.

If a sound recording has unnatural characteristics that distract the
listener then it's been recorded or produced incorrectly.

When I watch a TV programme I want to be able to concentrate on the
subject matter, not be distracted by gimmicky camera tricks. This is so
basic I'm amazed you question it.

If you find the Horizon programme and take a look you will see that we
had two blokes in discussion with their faces completely out of focus.
How can you pretend that that is pleasant, helpful, or even artistic?


Control of excess light does not f* up the picture.

Unless that was a weird joke about f stops I don't know what you mean.

Bill

  #13  
Old July 12th 17, 12:20 PM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
Jeff Layman[_2_]
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Posts: 644
Default an easy way to share files and a strange thing in a BBC programme

On 11/07/17 12:47, Bill Wright wrote:
On 11/07/2017 10:59, Paul Ratcliffe wrote:

Such ingenuity just to **** up the picture.


So you like everything in focus from the end of your nose to
infinity do you, and the flat pictures that result?


No, I like the subject of the shot to be in sharp focus, with the
background possibly slightly out of focus. This simulates human vision.
Since the cameraman's job is provide images that don't force the viewer
to be unduly aware of the medium, this is how it should be done. The
medium should be transparent.

If for instance the reader is constantly aware of the font, then the
book has been produced using the wrong font.

If a sound recording has unnatural characteristics that distract the
listener then it's been recorded or produced incorrectly.

When I watch a TV programme I want to be able to concentrate on the
subject matter, not be distracted by gimmicky camera tricks. This is so
basic I'm amazed you question it.

If you find the Horizon programme and take a look you will see that we
had two blokes in discussion with their faces completely out of focus.
How can you pretend that that is pleasant, helpful, or even artistic?


Absolutely right. It's something Marshall McLuhan recognised over 50
years ago. Although I believe that even he would have been surprised at
just how pervasive the "art" of distraction has become.

--

Jeff
 




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