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Horizon 2017: Strange Signals from Outer Space



 
 
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  #11  
Old July 7th 17, 12:57 PM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
tim...[_2_]
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Posts: 534
Default Horizon 2017: Strange Signals from Outer Space



"Martin" wrote in message
...
On Fri, 7 Jul 2017 09:40:42 +0100, "tim..."
wrote:



"Phi" wrote in message
news
Not much original science content in this programme and the narrator
keeps
repeating what the scientists say.


I think that looking for ET is nothing more than a child's game

If we do (somehow) find this information what the **** are we going to do
with it? How does it help mankind?

(given that we have exhausted the possibilities of intelligent life in our
own solar system) anything that we receive now wont be from a current
civilization, it will be from the civilization as it existed thousands of
years ago and could well be extinct by now.

and we can't communicate back. That conversation would take (the same)
thousands of years and we would all be dead before a reply came.


You can extend this to cover astronomy in general.


you could yes.

but there is a little bit more on the other side of the argument

e.g. a full understanding of gravity helps with a full understating of
general relativity (which I understand has some practical applications in
the real world - not my area, so I know no more).

and to get a full understanding of gravity it helps to make a study of
celestial bodies

I can't understand why our (the world's) government(s) puts billions of
pounds into providing science with the equipment that they use to
undertake
this IMHO worthless investigation.


Creates PhDs and provides those who have them employment.


but if that's all, that was kind of, my point

It's purely a circular need.

tim



  #12  
Old July 7th 17, 12:58 PM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
tim...[_2_]
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Posts: 534
Default Horizon 2017: Strange Signals from Outer Space



"Norman Wells" wrote in message
...
On 07/07/2017 09:40, tim... wrote:
"Phi" wrote in message
news


Not much original science content in this programme and the narrator
keeps repeating what the scientists say.


I think that looking for ET is nothing more than a child's game

If we do (somehow) find this information what the **** are we going to do
with it? How does it help mankind?


Sometimes knowledge is important or interesting just for what it is. It
shows we have vision beyond where the next meal is coming from. It's a
form of art.

We don't necessarily know what we're going to do with any information we
find. It depends to some extent on what it is we discover.


I get that

but billions of pounds/dollars worth!!!!!

tim


  #13  
Old July 7th 17, 12:59 PM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
tim...[_2_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 534
Default Horizon 2017: Strange Signals from Outer Space



"Huge" wrote in message
...
On 07/07/2017 09:40, tim... wrote:

I think that looking for ET is nothing more than a child's game

If we do (somehow) find this information what the **** are we going to
do with it? How does it help mankind?


Jhesus, what a tiresome little **** you are.


So your dad's bigger than mine is he?

well that must win you the argument then - well done!

tim



  #14  
Old July 7th 17, 02:07 PM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
Norman Wells[_6_]
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Posts: 948
Default Horizon 2017: Strange Signals from Outer Space

On 07/07/2017 12:58, tim... wrote:
"Norman Wells" wrote in message
...
On 07/07/2017 09:40, tim... wrote:
"Phi" wrote in message
news


Not much original science content in this programme and the narrator
keeps repeating what the scientists say.

I think that looking for ET is nothing more than a child's game

If we do (somehow) find this information what the **** are we going
to do with it? How does it help mankind?


Sometimes knowledge is important or interesting just for what it is.
It shows we have vision beyond where the next meal is coming from.
It's a form of art.

We don't necessarily know what we're going to do with any information
we find. It depends to some extent on what it is we discover.


I get that

but billions of pounds/dollars worth!!!!!


Have you got a cite for that?
  #15  
Old July 7th 17, 02:12 PM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
MR
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 24
Default Horizon 2017: Strange Signals from Outer Space

On Friday, 7 July 2017 11:02:17 UTC+1, Norman Wells wrote:
On 07/07/2017 09:40, tim... wrote:
"Phi" wrote in message
news


Not much original science content in this programme and the narrator
keeps repeating what the scientists say.


I think that looking for ET is nothing more than a child's game

If we do (somehow) find this information what the **** are we going to
do with it? How does it help mankind?


Sometimes knowledge is important or interesting just for what it is. It
shows we have vision beyond where the next meal is coming from. It's a
form of art.

We don't necessarily know what we're going to do with any information we
find. It depends to some extent on what it is we discover.

(given that we have exhausted the possibilities of intelligent life in
our own solar system) anything that we receive now wont be from a
current civilization, it will be from the civilization as it existed
thousands of years ago and could well be extinct by now.

and we can't communicate back. That conversation would take (the same)
thousands of years and we would all be dead before a reply came.

I can't understand why our (the world's) government(s) puts billions of
pounds into providing science with the equipment that they use to
undertake this IMHO worthless investigation.


I don't think they do actually. The amount spent on looking for
extraterrestrial life can only be a miniscule percentage of overall
spending on science and research.

There are far better uses of this money IMHO (and I'm talking "within
the world of science").


It depends whether you think any knowledge is worthless. Sometimes such
knowledge turns out to be surprising and surprisingly useful. If we
only did things that had a predictable outcome, we'd never do any
research and never find anything new.


Searching for the truth is human. We used religion until science pushed god(s) into the dustbin of delusion and superstition.
  #16  
Old July 7th 17, 03:39 PM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
Brian Gaff
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Posts: 6,879
Default Horizon 2017: Strange Signals from Outer Space

I don't think this happens on the bbc copy, it happens in programs like
helicopter heroes and its ilk though, as if the attention span is that of a
slug.
Brian

--
----- -
This newsgroup posting comes to you directly from...
The Sofa of Brian Gaff...

Blind user, so no pictures please!
"Roderick Stewart" wrote in message
...
Then they put up a caption for an advert break (even if the programme
has been made for the BBC) and then the narrator repeats what was said
immediately before the break.

Rod.

On Fri, 7 Jul 2017 08:44:40 +0100, "Brian Gaff"
wrote:

No he repeats what he heard somewhere before which was edited from a long
boring bit of audio of a scientist you never heard of, but had either a
nice face or interesting accent.
Brian

--
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This newsgroup posting comes to you directly from...
The Sofa of Brian Gaff...

Blind user, so no pictures please!
"Chris J Dixon" wrote in message
. ..
Phi wrote:

Not much original science content in this programme and the narrator
keeps
repeating what the scientists say.

What's that you say? The narrator just repeats what he has been
told?

Chris
--
Chris J Dixon Nottingham UK


Plant amazing Acers.




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This email has been checked for viruses by AVG.
http://www.avg.com



  #17  
Old July 7th 17, 03:47 PM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
Brian Gaff
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 6,879
Default Horizon 2017: Strange Signals from Outer Space

I'm not sure. I think its cultural and we waste enough money on so called
art.
If it helps us not to be so arrogant as to imagine we are the only ones out
here its worth it.

One thing I think is this though, If there ever were people out there, and
they survived long enough to find a way here, why don't we find old hardware
about the place?


When you consider the apparent age of the universe though there could have
been literally millions of civilisations which came and went in the time.
I think our main claim to fame is to be lucky enough to be able to still be
here and looking. Most of thesolare systems we have seen so far are not long
lived, with the right stars and without some big disaster to wipe them out.
If a nearby star blew up or a couple of neutron stars merged the resulting
balast and radiiation woud kill us all off.
Brian cataclysmic event to wip

--
----- -
This newsgroup posting comes to you directly from...
The Sofa of Brian Gaff...

Blind user, so no pictures please!
"tim..." wrote in message
news


"Phi" wrote in message
news
Not much original science content in this programme and the narrator
keeps repeating what the scientists say.


I think that looking for ET is nothing more than a child's game

If we do (somehow) find this information what the **** are we going to do
with it? How does it help mankind?

(given that we have exhausted the possibilities of intelligent life in our
own solar system) anything that we receive now wont be from a current
civilization, it will be from the civilization as it existed thousands of
years ago and could well be extinct by now.

and we can't communicate back. That conversation would take (the same)
thousands of years and we would all be dead before a reply came.

I can't understand why our (the world's) government(s) puts billions of
pounds into providing science with the equipment that they use to
undertake this IMHO worthless investigation.

There are far better uses of this money IMHO (and I'm talking "within the
world of science").

tim









  #19  
Old July 7th 17, 04:14 PM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
Jim Lesurf[_2_]
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Posts: 4,191
Default Horizon 2017: Strange Signals from Outer Space

In article , tim...

wrote:

but there is a little bit more on the other side of the argument


e.g. a full understanding of gravity helps with a full understating of
general relativity (which I understand has some practical applications
in the real world - not my area, so I know no more).


Yes. e.g. in precision clocking for various satellite-related purposes,
etc. GPS being the well known example.

and to get a full understanding of gravity it helps to make a study of
celestial bodies


I can't understand why our (the world's) government(s) puts billions
of pounds into providing science with the equipment that they use to
undertake this IMHO worthless investigation.


Creates PhDs and provides those who have them employment.


but if that's all, that was kind of, my point


It's purely a circular need.


Well, once we add all the things we *don't* understand like 'Dark' (sic)
Matter, 'Dark' Energy, universal accelleration, etc, it at least makes us
think that perhaps many things we currently assume 'impossible' (or haven't
thought of at all!) will turn out to be possible and highly useful at some
future time.

How many before the time of the earliest discoveries of 'electricity' would
have forseen all the significant applications we now have for
Electromagnetism?

BTW gravitational field detection systems do now have various uses. There
was a TV programme about this a while ago.

Jim

--
Please use the address on the audiomisc page if you wish to email me.
Electronics https://www.st-andrews.ac.uk/~www_pa...o/electron.htm
Armstrong Audio http://www.audiomisc.co.uk/Armstrong/armstrong.html
Audio Misc http://www.audiomisc.co.uk/index.html

  #20  
Old July 7th 17, 05:06 PM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
Norman Wells[_6_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 948
Default Horizon 2017: Strange Signals from Outer Space

On 07/07/2017 14:12, MR wrote:
On Friday, 7 July 2017 11:02:17 UTC+1, Norman Wells wrote:
On 07/07/2017 09:40, tim... wrote:
"Phi" wrote in message
news


Not much original science content in this programme and the narrator
keeps repeating what the scientists say.

I think that looking for ET is nothing more than a child's game

If we do (somehow) find this information what the **** are we going to
do with it? How does it help mankind?


Sometimes knowledge is important or interesting just for what it is. It
shows we have vision beyond where the next meal is coming from. It's a
form of art.

We don't necessarily know what we're going to do with any information we
find. It depends to some extent on what it is we discover.

(given that we have exhausted the possibilities of intelligent life in
our own solar system) anything that we receive now wont be from a
current civilization, it will be from the civilization as it existed
thousands of years ago and could well be extinct by now.

and we can't communicate back. That conversation would take (the same)
thousands of years and we would all be dead before a reply came.

I can't understand why our (the world's) government(s) puts billions of
pounds into providing science with the equipment that they use to
undertake this IMHO worthless investigation.


I don't think they do actually. The amount spent on looking for
extraterrestrial life can only be a miniscule percentage of overall
spending on science and research.

There are far better uses of this money IMHO (and I'm talking "within
the world of science").


It depends whether you think any knowledge is worthless. Sometimes such
knowledge turns out to be surprising and surprisingly useful. If we
only did things that had a predictable outcome, we'd never do any
research and never find anything new.


Searching for the truth is human. We used religion until science pushed god(s) into the dustbin of delusion and superstition.

I don't think it's possible to search for 'truth' in any objective
sense. All you can search for is information.

 




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